Sam Murphy: Make a swift recovery

There are three essential ingredients in your post-workout beverage: carbohydrate, to help replace the body's depleted glycogen stores; fluid, to replace that lost in sweat; and protein, to help stimulate muscle synthesis. And, no, that doesn't mean Guinness qualifies. But Lucozade's new recovery drink gets a tick in all three boxes and, despite the ominous sounding 'orange and passionfruit flavour', it's surprisingly palatable - not too gunky and not too sickly either.

· Lucozade Sports Recovery drink, £6.90 for 10 sachets, £31.05 for 50, from theLSSA.com/shop (orders received by 2pm are delivered the next day).

Running women

It's time to get fit for Race For Life, the women-only series of 5km walks/runs in aid of Cancer Research UK. The first event takes place on May 3 in Battersea Park, London. But there are another 229 opportunities between then and the end of July to raise a sweat - and funds - for charity, with races happening everywhere from Inverness to Penzance. A record-breaking 800,000 women are expected to take part this year, but don't count on a PB unless you are adept at dodging congas, toddlers and pushchairs.

· To find your nearest event, go to raceforlife.org or call 0870 513 4314.

Footloose

It's pretty clear that women and men have different shaped feet but the only gender difference in most training shoes has been ghastly pink piping. Nike is putting things right with a range designed to fit the female foot. Air Zoom Equalon, Air Zoom Apace and Nike Free 5.0 II cater for different biomechanics. And Merrell (0117 963 6363, merrell.com) has launched Q-Form, a range that caters for a female gait.

Eat Right winners

Meet Emma Chaplin and Aine Gallagher, winners of Weekend's Eat Right Challenge, who each now have a year's free membership to Eat Right, the Guardian's new online healthy eating club (guardian.co.uk/eatright). 'The timing is perfect,' says Emma, from Lewes, who is juggling being a mum to three-year-old Felix with studying to be a psychotherapist. 'I have just turned 40, and I've reached the point where I want to make a change. I have a lovely, lively young son and I would like to be fitter, slimmer and healthier to get more involved in playing football, cricket, and the running-around-being-mad-in-the-park games we love. Taking on the challenge in such a public way is a bit daunting, but it also means it will be difficult to slide out of. And it will be nice to have the Eat Right membership as support.'

Aine, a 32-year-old trainee midwife from south London, is looking forward to embarking on a double whammy of exercise and healthy eating. 'I've never been a dieter, nor taken regular exercise, and the weight has snuck up on me,' she says. 'Hopefully the initial improvements will make me feel energised and motivated to carry on.'

Thanks to guardian.co.uk who have provided this article. View the original here.