Patient and partner to give patients greater access to clinical trials

The UK's leading independent health information website, Patient and, the website that connects patients to clinical trials worldwide, have announced today the launch of a new easy-to-use tool that empowers anyone searching for information on to find and directly apply to participate in clinical trials.

Despite recent advances in medicine, millions of patients still lack effective treatments that could cure or help them manage their conditions. Evidence from clinical trials helps identify which treatments work best, and helps scientists develop new or better treatments.

Ben Foster, Operations Director at Patient, says: "We have over 8.7 million visitors to our site every month and our audience is on the rise. Our experience proves that patients are increasingly using the internet to find out about and manage their health care issues. Our partnership with TrialReach adds even greater value to the service we provide by putting more knowledge directly into patients' hands."

"With more than 80% of people searching for health-related information online, it's not good enough anymore to simply copy chunks of text from scientific protocols and list them in obscure registries," says TrialReach CEO, Pablo Graiver. "We firmly believe that clinical trial information should be made easily available to all patients, in a format that we can all understand and rely on. We couldn't find better partners for this mission than Patient, who provide some of the best health content in the world to millions of patients every month."

The trial finder has been developed with patients in mind; making it much easier for them to connect with, understand and apply for clinical trials. This approach has already been endorsed by patients. Kristen Lane is one of the thousands of patients who has already used TrialReach to apply for a clinical trial. Kristen has Lupus and since going on the clinical trial her symptoms have been in remission. "It was very easy, I just wish more doctors knew about it."