The exercise-hater's workout

The trees that are slow to grow bear the best fruit. - Moliere

Most of you know how passionate I am about training and nutrition. However, I am constantly reminded of the fact that I am in the minority.

Recently, I received an email from someone who enjoys reading my articles but still hates to work out and will do anything possible not to. However, in the same sentence, this person also asked for some sort of solution to their issue.

It's the great dilemma: You hate to workout, but you know you must.

For those who hate working out, I have a psychological and physical solution. It’s not hard and it will provide results.

From a psychological perspective, those who hate to workout must focus on consistency as opposed to volume. Forget about the number of days you’re supposed to lift weights or the number of days you’re supposed to perform cardiovascular exercise. It doesn’t matter what “must do” statistics any health related agency gives you or what any personal trainer tells you. It doesn’t matter, because you know and I know that you HATE TO WORKOUT.

Unfortunately, the health and fitness industry has not yet fully embraced that motivation and emotion is the starting place for one to begin to improve their fitness level. That being said, I am providing the “I Hate to Workout” program.

You’ll only be working out twice a week. It doesn’t matter what two days as long as they are not back-to-back days. I don’t want you to work out more than two days per week. If you want, add another day in a month. However, don’t work out more than two days per week for the first month.

Consistency should be one of your goals, and you’ll best achieve it with a realistic schedule. At the end of one month, I want you to be able to say, “I got all my workouts in.”

Time Spent in the Gym

Your workout will take 40-50 minutes to complete, including cool down. Discipline and consistency must be coaxed for best results. I know that if I detested performing a certain activity, I’d want to do it as little as possible. However, if I knew it was good for me and I didn’t like the activity, I know I could dedicate two days a week for a minimum amount of time. I wouldn’t like it, but I know I could do it.

The workout will be a balance between weight training and cardiovascular exercise. It will be comprised of exercises that will make the most physical improvement. For this routine, you’ll need equipment in your home or to have access to a gym.

Unfortunately, I’m making some assumptions that you know the actual exercises as well as the proper form and technique for each. The routine will be designated with sets and reps such as the following example:

2x15 (two sets of 15 repetitions).

DAY 1
Warm-up -- 5 minutes (any cardio equipment)

Squats
2x15
(use barbell, dumbbells or no weights)

Seated Over Head Dumbbell Shoulder Press
2x12

Leg Extension Machine
2x12

Flat Dumbbell Chest Press
2x10

Fit Ball Crunch
2x20

Walking Lunge
2 sets (15 steps forward and then return is one set)

Seated Alternate Dumbbell Curls
2x10

Lying Dumbbell Triceps Extensions
2x10

Cardio
20 minutes, treadmill (brisk walk)

DAY 2
Warm up for 5 minutes

Dumbbell Incline Fly
2x12

Inverted Leg Press
2x15

Seated Dumbbell Lateral Raise
2x12

Seated Leg Curl for Hamstrings
2x10

Reverse Ab Curl (Hip Lift off Floor) for lower abs
2x as many as possible

Seated Row
2x10

Lat Pulldown
2x12

Standing Calf Raise
2x15

Fit Ball Crunch
2x as many as possible

Cardio - 20 minutes (Stairmaster or stationary bike) If this seems like too much, then start with one set per exercise.

This is a realistic workout that will improve your fitness level as well as provide the benefits of physical change. The key will be in the consistency.

Start a diet plan at tescodiets.com

Thanks to tescodiets.com who have provided this article.