Report finds high thresholds to access children's mental health services

What did the report find?


The report found that just £75 million of the £250 million set aside to make improvements in the first year has actually made its way to the clinical commissioning groups.

These regional groups are the local gate-keepers to healthcare funding within a region and control how it is distributed. Of this £75 million, it is hard to be sure how much has reached frontline services, but some mental health providers have suggested that, as yet, they have not seen the increased investment at all.

According to the report, specialist mental health services are turning away almost a quarter of children and young people referred to them before they are even seen. This is often because there are "high thresholds" for accessing services; this means they can only manage to see the extremely unwell due to resource issues.

The report also specified that two-thirds of young people aged 16-34 who have attempted suicide did not subsequently receive medical or psychological help in any way after the event. This is highly worrying as these young people and their families need specialist support to try and break this cycle. Early treatment and intervention is often the best way to help children and young people affected in this way.