Dialysis: Making the Right Choices for You

Kidney Research UK has published a comprehensive dialysis decision aid booklet, providing information and support to patients approaching kidney failure, to help make an informed decision about which type of dialysis treatment is right for them. The booklet was developed through a Kidney Research UK-supported study by the Yorkshire Dialysis Decision Aid (YoDDA) research team in collaboration with Baxter Healthcare Ltd, the British Renal Society and the Renal Association. See the Kidney Research UK website for more information.

 

Haemodialysis (HD)

Peritoneal Dialysis (PD)

 Haemodialysis at a hospital or centre (CHD)Haemodialysis at home (HHD) Peritoneal Dialysis Continuous Ambulatory (CAPD)Peritoneal Dialysis Automated (APD) 
Place of dialysis carePeople travel to a hospital or to specialist centres for a dialysis session.People have dialysis sessions at home.Most people choose dialysis sessions at home or work. It can be any clean place.Most people choose dialysis sessions at home. It can be any clean place.
How dialysis worksAttaching to a machine, for 4 hours per session, by the arm or leg.Attaching to a machine, for 4 hours per session, by the arm or leg.Attaching to a bag of fluid for about 40 minutes per session by the belly.Attaching to a machine for about 9 hours per session by the belly.
Usual number of sessions in a week3 days in a week.At least 3 times a week (night or day).Every day.Every night.
Usual number of sessions in a day1 session per day.1 session per day.4 sessions per day (exchanges).1 session per day.
People carrying out dialysisStaff at the hospital or centre carry out the session.The person is trained to carry out the session.The person is trained to carry out the exchange.The person is trained to carry out the exchange.
Usual time of dialysis Most sessions are during the day; a few offer night sessions. Most people sit or lie on a couch or bed. Most read, listen to music, watch TV or sleep in sessions.Most people usually choose daytime. Most people sit or lie on a couch or bed. They tend to read, listen to music, watch TV or sleep during sessions.Most people choose to have exchanges in the morning, and before lunch, evening meal, and bed. Most people sit or stand during exchanges.Most people usually choose night time. Most people are asleep.
Equipment neededA machine outside the body. The machines are set up next to patient beds or reclining chairs all the time.A machine outside the body, and dialysate fluid. The machine is usually the size of a large chest of drawers.Bags to take away the used dialysate and bags with the clean fluid. A hook to hang the bag of fluid during an exchange.A machine outside the body and, dialysate fluid. The machine is usually the size of a small suitcase.
Changes to the homeThe hospital or specialist centres have dialysis machines plumbed in, next to beds or reclining chairs.The machine is plumbed into a person’s home. Storage is needed to keep the machine, bed or reclining chair and supplies.Storage is needed at home to keep the bags of dialysate fluid, like a cupboard or clean space in a shed, basement or garage.Storage is needed at home to keep the machine and supplies, like a cupboard or clean space in a shed, basement or garage.
Kidney Service Support for dialysisThey organise transport for people to get to dialysis sessions and they help plan care when people have trips away from home.They organise the machine delivery and changes to the home, and plan care for when people have trips away from home.They organise bag deliveries and changes to the home, and plan care when people have trips away from home.They organise equipment deliveries and changes to the home, and plan care when people have trips away from home.

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Author:
Kidney Research UK
Peer Reviewer:
Kidney Research UK
Document ID:
28956 (v2)
Last Checked:
10 March 2017
Next Review:
09 March 2020

Disclaimer: This article is for information only and should not be used for the diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. Patient Platform Limited has used all reasonable care in compiling the information but make no warranty as to its accuracy. Consult a doctor or other health care professional for diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions. For details see our conditions.