Do you do this too?

Posted , 6 users are following.

When I see a post from someone that just had the surgery I feel really sorry for them but I also think: "Oh Lord I so glad I am 12 weeks out!"

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27 Replies

  • Posted

    Yes Mila I feel that way too! I'm 7 weeks out and so glad I'm not just starting the process!! I don't and then maybe I do want to tell them what there in for but have to remember everyone is different!!

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    • Posted

      I know. I am almost too scared to say too much if I respond. I don't want to scare and as you say they could very well be on the other end of the bell curve of recovery. All I know is that I was not prepared at all what followed and this forum wad immensely helpful.

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  • Posted

    Yes, I do feel very sorry for those having a much tougher time than me!  I'm two weeks out and looking forward to the next knee which will hopefully be in about three and a half months time.  That knee is giving me more grief than the operated knee!

    The only thing I'm having difficulty with at the moment is when I walk up a step, unoperated leg leading, and as I lift the operated knee to bring that up there is a sharp pain at the back of the knee.  I' m thinking this is probably just inflamed ligaments?  But I did discover today that I could bring the operated knee up to rest comfortably with the leg bent on the recliner!  It felt like another milestone:-)

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  • Posted

    Yes ! I say I am so glad to be 9  months out. But my heart goes out to everyone who is or has been through this. It is a long process.
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  • Posted

    I'm in the least best place as not had mine done yet. From what I read I have wondered if it is really worth it although things are bad now, there is always a risk of worse

     

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    • Posted

      Cynthia, I must say everyone I spoke to before I had my bilateral knee replacement said best thing they ever did and do the PT. Then again they were all more than a year post op. No one went into any detail!! So I am assuming that in a year or more all this will be a distant memory!!
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    • Posted

      I can only speak for myself and I met 3 other people varying from 6 months to 2-3 years post op. All of them very relieved that they are free from osteoarthritis and doing very well. One of those people had his second knee done 6 months after the first one. Myself, free of osteoarthritis pain but draw the short end of the recovery stick. It is a long haul. Only now I am starting to get excited about the potential my new knee has. Everyone is completely different!
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    • Posted

      Perhaps it is like birthing a child - we certainly do "forget" that or I doubt there would be many more only children. Although that is shorter term recovery! I'm just going to hope for the best.....

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    • Posted

      Absolutely. Except that I was told that I would be walking independently by 2 weeks and be able to return to work in 6 weeks. I have encountered patients that had that kind of recovery. But more often than not that is a very very unrealistic recovery. You should write and look up posts from Chico Marx. If you can't find him just post a discussion saying looking for Chico Marx. He is very knowledgeable and have a way with explaining every single thing about a knee replacement you may want to know. He also had "ready" links to different topics you can read. Take care

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    • Posted

      Yes, but many of us still experience pain.  I do at 11 months p.o. tkr.  Also, my other knee is acting up and I will never, ever have that 2nd knee replaced knowing what I know now.
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    • Posted

      Janice, I had both knees done at the same time because I know myself and I prob never would go back for the other. I had never had any kind of surgery or anesthesia before and I was scared to death of the surgery!! Now I know the surgery was the very least of my worries! The aftermath is what is so challenging, painful and frustrating! So the one good thing is that both knees are done and I just have to get through this journey of recouperation!!
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    • Posted

      Janice, more than once I've said to myself "I'll never be the same. I shouldn't have done this." I was even thinking the way my knees were before surgery is better than I feel now. I can only hope that in the next months I feel differently! We'll get through this!!!

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    • Posted

      Cynthia, I must admit this is what put me off for so long.  I was offered knee replacements 8 -10 years before I decided the time had come.  Initially I had no idea that it could get so much worse and also that the pain would be so bad when I wasn't even walking, and felt very much that I could go from bad to worse, having read all the horror stories about complications (and even speaking to someone who's wife ended up with their leg amputated because she got an infection!!!!!)  BUT by the time I went to my GP and said 'the time has come' I'd got nothing to lose.  The pain was constant, our lives were so limited because I couldn't walk far at all and that walking was slower than a tortoise.  (A slow tortoise at that!).   Every step was a struggle, and I mean that.  It was exhausting.  I'd had enough.  So I went from feeling negative about knee replacements to totally opposite - I couldn't wait.  I STILL had a moment outside the theatre where I felt I wanted to get up and run (LOL!) but boy has it been the best thing I could have done.  It's the OTHER knee giving me grief and keeping me awake and I'm hoping that will be done in three and a half months.  So I do wonder if 'the starting point' has a lot to do with my attitude towards knee replacements now.  Every day I see an improvement, even though I'm only two weeks and one day post op!  Whereas with the other knee it's still the same old pain all the time!

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    • Posted

      I'm shocked that you were told you'd be walking independently by 2 weeks Milla!  I was told to go from crutches to two sticks at three weeks and that by six weeks they want you walking indpendently.  I think when they give you unrealistic expectations it's depressing because you feel you're not reaching 'goals'.   Everyone is so different too!  My recovery has been much faster than I expected and so much easier, but I know the next knee won't necessarily be the same, but the fact they've given me the time they have for changing from crutches to sticks etc. means I'll be feeling as though I'm doing well if I achieve it before that time, and that's encouraging rather than discouraging, if you know what I mean.

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    • Posted

      I know what you mean - my 89 year old Mum was walking much better than me a while ago when we went for a walk. That does put things in perspective. It is easy to convince myself I am fine when at home sitting - the pain kicks in upon rising, walking any distance and at night.

      ?We don't really have the option of running out of the OR - haha - I came close to that years back with a different op, but my husband was with me and talked me out of leaving.

      This time, they don't allow anyone to stay and wait with us, so I'm hoping I don't bottle out!

      Pleased you are making progress and have a realistic expectation which will get through the next one. Good luck for when that comes around.

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    • Posted

      Chris yes, not only did I freak out initially because I thought something was wrong because I could not meet any goals. Also left me with an unpleasant situation with work. Had to keep on getting new dates for return. "I am coming back. No, can't come back yet x3. The only thing that saves me is my protection under the Americans with disability Act. An employer cannot fire you, demote you, or put a cap on time off. I cannot help but wonder if they had told me what the pain and recovery realistically look like if I would have had the surgery. Both knees are bad but my left much worse. I had ACL surgery on that leg 34 years ago. Plus, during surgery they found that I was born with a "gross abnormality and deformity of the patella". I really wish I could avoid having the other knee done. At best I am hoping to stick it out at least 3-4 years. One day at a time right!

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    • Posted

      I'm 73 years old now and I too experience much anxiety while waiting outside operating room but I DO remember back in the day.....uh lets say 1960's and 1970's, all the various surgeries, (D&C, Lumpectomy, etc.}...we were always injected, with what I don't know, maybe valium, before being rolled through the hallways, elevator and on to that wait, feeling high as a kite and so confident and happy.  Why isn't this done any longer?  It would be soooo much easier on the patient to cope with that interminable wait outside the O.R.  Then of course being wheeled in and then hooked up to the bag of unconciousness. 

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    • Posted

      Yes! Where is the "happy juice"? I asked (looking forward to it) and nope they don't do it anymore. It was a little nerve wrecking being wheeled into the operating room cold sober and seeing all the equipment but he did the spinal block fast so the anxiety was short-lived.

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    • Posted

      I was lucky. I'm in the US and they gave me either Versed or Propafol (spelling??) before they wheeled me anywhere. It was wonderful! Woke up 3 1/2 hrs later and all done!!

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    • Posted

      The worst bit for me was being wheeled into the room outside the operating theatre where it was FREEZING!  I was shivering!  THEN, to make it worse, they sloshed my back down with an icy liquid!  I gasped with the shock of the cold LOL!  BUT then they put a warm tube over me that was pumped with warm air and it was at that point that a sedative kicked in and all was rosy:-) Only very vague noises that I remember after that including a bit of hammering and the noise of staples going in but it all felt well removed.  This was with a spinal.
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    • Posted

      Thanks Cynthia:-)  Only just seen this because it didn't come through as an email - some do and some don't!  Yes, I agree - that perspective is important and makes it all worthwhile. 

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    • Posted

      I've absolutely no doubt you'll know when is the right time for you.  My left leg that was recently done was bowing out significantly (as though I'd just got off my horse) because of the arthritis, to the point where I had to get all my left shoes raised 2cm!  Now it's longer than the other leg LOL!  But I'm not doing anything with most shoes until the other one is done:-))))

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