Preparing myself for tkr

Posted , 16 users are following.

Just wondering how long before most people return to work after a tkr? I was thinking that after 2-3 weeks I would resume my life and go back to work and most of my normal activities. After reading some of the discussions this tkr sounds a lot more painful and difficult than I was thinking. I have been through breast cancer twice in the past six years, fractured my llowet back by falling off my mule and two fractures in my upper back due to osteoporosis. I have been thru a lot and this tkr is frightening to me. I can't stand being confined to the house. I take care of young adults and need to be able to chase after them and cannot be on pain meds and working.

I just turned 60 last week. Have any of you gone on disability because of the tkr?

I appreciate your feedback

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  • Posted

    Hi Cindy,

    I am 59 and just had a tkr, been off work for 5 weeks, returning on Monday:5 weeks & 3 days since the op....l am a manage so not really physically tiring...,l had it in ny head l would be back after a couple of weeks-but no chance- pain and lack of sleep. Don't rush take it easy ....you will know when it's time ........good luck

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  • Posted

    Hi I'm 5 months post op and 54 have always been fit, my TKR has made such a difference to life and I'm no longer in constant pain, but believe me it's a long old process to recover from this operation, I went back to work after 3 months I didn't like being stuck in the house but unfortunately there is no choice, pain meds and ice and elevating help so much as dose the daily exercise, have the op take it easy but don't plan on running around for a long time, but it's worth it in the end, good luck

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  • Posted

    Hi Cindy, TKR is major surgery. It's very painful. I'm a year post op and still a bit limited. Don't be frightened about it, it is what it is.  

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  • Posted

    I have been on disability through work. I'm 8 weeks out and have not returned to work yet. They say it takes a year to be back to "normal ". It is very painful especially the first month. Make sure you are mentally prepared because it can take its toll on you. Good Luck!

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  • Posted

    You've got at least 12 weeks before you will fell normal again in most cases but you're too early in your recovery to be fully healed, take your time you will improve.

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  • Posted

    Dear Cindi, I've been thru the two breast cancer surgeries but we don't walk on our breasts do we?  With your work, you will need to be able to walk.  I am 7 weeks post TKR and still need to have rest times during the day. There are so many expectations to do your excersises and hydrotherapy. That has really helped strengthen the muscles of the new knee.   I'm a hairdresser so need to stand most of my working day. I find I'm booking clients on the hour rather than on the half hour as my legs to to be elevated.  Every one is different and you may be stoic and able but my specialist said it could take twelve months.  That's like waving the red flag to the bull...I was walking without crutches at three weeks but used one crutch only when going shopping etc. you can't drive for six weeks post surgery....I am 64 and find that go slow if you can afford to.   Ask work for extra time if you can you won't regret it..your body has had major, invasive surgery.  Let it heal properly. Kind regards, 

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  • Posted

    if its anything like mine you must be joking. I had mine done on the 13th February this year and I am still having trouble walking. Make sure you have titanium - I think my problem is I am allergic to the cobalt chrome, which is what my 'new' knee is made of.

    I was awake all night with terrible pain, much like the osteoartiritis pain I had before the op. I am seeing somebody on November 8th for a second opinion. 

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  • Posted

    For your own benefit I think it will be important for you to set a more realistic expectation from yourself. I am 53 and just hit the 12 week mark today. I am thinking about returning to work part time in a couple weeks but am still not even close to having the strength and stamina that I had before the procedure. I am a nurse and will need to be on my feet most of my day. My surgery and recovery went pretty smoothly and I had no serious set backs. Please allow yourself (physically and mentally) the needed time to heal. This operation is a big investment into your future well being and the recovery cannot be rushed. Listen to others on this board who have gone through this - it is a marathon not a sprint. Best wishes for a good outcome!
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    • Posted

      Thank you for your advice. I need to hear from people that have gone through this and to hear the positive and the negative. I guess I just need to take it a day at a time
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  • Posted

    You are completely unrealistic, living in a fantasy world. The stitches won't be out for two weeks, the dr, if he's any kind of dr, won't allow you to drive for 6 weeks. Can you imagine what would happen to that raw, unhealed, delicate surgery if you were in an accident and shoved up under the steering wheel. I've gone through 11 surgeries on my knee/leg plus radiation and 5 complete rehabs. Everyone different but everyone slow and painful. This is a process, unlike the other surgeries/injuries you've had. So much is done during surgery that Dr's don't talk to you about. The two young adults need to mature very quickly as you are the one needing the help this time. Wearing yourself out trying to keep up with them is a sure recipe for disaster. You will hear it over and over......because its true........this is a marathon, not a sprint.

    Last year I had to have the prosthesis removed and left out for 4 months due to a staph infection. Then a new one inserted this starting rehab again. On top of that, I'm the caregiver or a semi invalid wife with advancing Parkinson's. I managed with some outside help but I can tell you, instead of a year, I'm looking at 2 to 3 years.

    As far as the imaginary "can't stand to be cooped up"....get over it. This surgery has a way of teaching people patience. However; this isn't to say yo should roll over and play invalid. You'll have plenty of work to do just don't overdo.

    I may come across as a complete a**hole but Better than let you set yourself up for a big disappointment or worse yet, a lengthy, painful st back.

    Best of luck. Stay with this group. We've all been through it.....the medical people have only studied and read about it.

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  • Posted

    I have a friend  who went back to work after 6weeks part-time, i on the other hand had to retire because i was in pain all the time, now facing another surgery. Good Luck to you
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  • Posted

    Hate . But as I understand it TKR is the worst. I'm one month out I'm doing pretty good but they still not straight. I am not going to let it beat me though I'm going to beat it. I am home alone mostly except for  when cousin not working and she can take me to the store. I am struggling with wanting to just go get my haircut go pick up a thing or two at the grocery but I have to wait and wait and wait. If you do have the TKR do not go to a PT facility they are terrible. I was in one for three  weeks and I felt like it was minimal add and by that I mean my recovery was minimal. Being home with a little puppy dog I have to get up when he wants me up and I just do it. I also have home health twice a week. If you are concerned  about your mobility I would think about it a little bit more unless you are in severe pain. I've heard people say they never took a pain pill after they got out of the hospital. It all depends on your surgeon and your aftercare good luck 

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  • Posted

    Some report 3 months and are OK (a definite minority).  Some report 3 months and can't handle it.  Some take a year (another minority).  Average?  Five to six months.  Push it before you're ready and you'll pay the price in pain and swelling.  You do NOT want to go back to work reliant on opioid painkillers...especially if you're driving.  Bad choice.  It's very Zen: You'll go back to work when you're ready to go back to work.  Expecting to put a specific number on it in advance is an exercise in futility.

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  • Posted

    It depends on what kind of work that you do. I'm a respiratory therapist and work 12 hr shifts. There is no way I could have gone back to that for at least 3 months. But even if you have a desk job, I would say at least 6 weeks. If you have a lot of swelling, elevation and ice are very important. If you sit a lot at your job, your swelling will be worse as well. Good luck to you. Try to manage your expectations. I expected way too much of myself. I too have had many very invasive surgeries, but this has been the worst. I am so much better now and have no regrets. Just don't get impatient with yourself. Best wishes and Godspeed!

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