Skip to content
alicia903 alicia903

The Impact of Innovation

The Internet of Medical Things (loMT) is the ability of medical devices to communicate with healthcare IT systems.  A wearable device is an example of this concept but over the years not only being able to see patients remotely but also monitoring them remotely has grown rapidly.  The ability to monitor patients remotely involves reviewing and interpreting the information collected from the device.  This innovation holds the patient accountable to the providers directions given, the physician no longer has to depend on the patient to give a progress report, and medications taken can be more precise in target area, and physicians and others involved in coordination of care have access to the information and can make the best-informed decisions on treatment plans.

This is a great tool that helps the patients and physicians in the long run. Patients are accountable for their care and physicians can use the tool to make the best decisions regarding care. This tool can be used as a proactive approach to make the most of patients and physicians time during appointments by allowing more time to talk about treatment and improving the patient’s health as well as improve the efficiency of care.

Wearable and monitoring devices will require a little more work when it comes to regulatory clearance but in the long run I think it will be worth it because this tool could tap into taking some weight off the health care expenditures for our country. As they have the potential to lower spending on hospital care and physician care because patients have the potential to getting better since they are monitored more closely. 

 

https://getreferralmd.com/2018/01/future-healthcare-technology-advancements-2018/

 

https://medtechengine.com/category/health-economics/

2 Replies

  • jx41870 alicia903

    Hi Alicia.  Yes, and there already are some nice electronic widgets for glucose monitoring and insulin injection, mostly for type1 diabetics today.  And they are working hard on that glucose monitoring widget so type2's can use them someday too - that means much cheaper since most type2's "don't need it as badly".  In a few years we hope to have magic patches we can put on, they'll measure BG continuously for about 24 hours, then you discard it and put on another.  And they will probably attach to a tiny widget that transmits to your phone.

Report as inappropriate

Thanks for your help!

We want the forums to be a useful resource for our users but it is important to remember that the forums are not moderated or reviewed by doctors and so you should not rely on opinions or advice given by other users in respect of any healthcare matters. Always speak to your doctor before acting and in cases of emergency seek appropriate medical assistance immediately. Use of the forums is subject to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy and steps will be taken to remove posts identified as being in breach of those terms.