The upside to menopause

Posted , 9 users are following.

Hey ladies, I know a lot of us are suffering, in varying degrees, with our menopausal symptoms, and can even feel neglected by the medical community, so thought we could do with a bit of positivity. I found this article in the "Healthy Women" magazine:

There are plenty of menopause stories around. Most, rather than celebrate the end of a woman's monthly cycles, demonize menopause with tales of hot flashes, night sweats, weight gain, vaginal dryness, thinning hair, sleep disturbances, mood swings and more.

But menopause is not something to fear. There are things to celebrate about it. Here are just a few.

  1. No more pregnancy worries. Sex without thinking about pregnancy can be extremely liberating. Not being preoccupied about the unanticipated outcome of sex frees us up to enjoy it more.
  2. No more hormonal headaches. Women have more migraines than men, and a large percentage of those coincide with ovulation and menstruation. Fluctuating levels of estrogen and progesterone can be powerful triggers for menstrual migraines. Since the levels of these hormones fall after menopause, the incidence of migraines usually falls, too.
  3. No more wondering if we'll bleed. Before menopause comes perimenopause, a span of time when periods become erratic and bleeding might be heavier and less predictable than normal. Menopause puts an end to all that and an end to deliberating about whether we can or should wear those white pants or lug around a supply of feminine products "just in case.

    4.A boost of self-assurance. Remember feeling self-conscious, unsure, less-than or inferior? Without monthly periods, pregnancy risks, mood swings and PMS woes to occupy our minds and moods, women often feel more empowered and capable both in their personal and professional endeavors. A greater sense of confidence accompanies childrearing, marriage, relationships, careers and just … life.

  4. An opportunity to reexamine your life. The anthropologist Margaret Mead used the term "menopausal zest" to refer to that time when women experience a rush of both physical and psychological energy and renewed vigor. Menopause allows us the opportunity to take stock of things, along with gaining influence in workplace, family and political worlds. We can better trust our intuition and instinct to guide us, no longer satisfied with the status quo of yesterday. We feel empowered to take more risks.
  5. Time for self-care. Our children might be grown and out of the house or maybe they're partially launched and on the road to independence. Either way, that means we have more time to focus on ourselves. Eating a healthy diet, exercising regularly and making other positive changes to improve our health can quickly put the control back in our hands and benefit our physical, emotional and spiritual selves.
  6. Uterine fibroids shrink. Fibroids, which are usually benign tumors or growths that develop in the muscles of the uterus, are very common and affect up to 50 percent of women at some time, most often in their 30s or 40s. Because they need estrogen to grow, our risk of developing them is greatly reduced when hormones subside. It's not uncommon for them to stop growing or even shrink after menopause.

While some may feel this article is overly positive, I have to admit, I certainly don't miss periods. I am reminded every month about all the bad things about periods because I have a teenage daughter ... I just think, thank God that's all over for me!

8 likes, 15 replies

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15 Replies

  • Posted

    Thank you for sharing. Someone else recently posted a positive post. I think many of us truly need this. It is helpful to focus on the positive, even when we are feeling truly yucky. Blessings

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  • Posted

    Hi, thank you for being postive but i have to say i feel like this article was written by a man or a woman that breezed thru. I have to say i have never felt worse physically and mentally than i have since this started over 2 years ago. I have had multiple tests for the many symptoms and i am very grateful to God thaf they have all come back ok. I try not to focus on the negative anymore as i have been very blessed and i know there are people that are going thru much worse but this truly has been the hardest time of my life. I had a hysterectomy but i still have my ovaries so yes i do enjoy the fact that i dont have a period anymore but i would take PMS over this any day of the week. Im sorry i dont mean to be a Debbie Downer but these type of articles upset me like we are just choosing to feel bad. Thanks for letting me vent! Hugs to all!!

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    • Posted

      I think that these posts are for us to connect. I too have suffered for the last 5 years more than I care to think about. Like you many tests, but luckily have come out okay. I have good days, okay days and horrible days. I am thankful to read all of these posts and feelings as it helps me to feel I am not crazy or a hypochondriac, peri is real. Thank you for sharing.

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    • Posted

      My peri started at age 47. I had some bad times too, but now at age 53 that seems to have passed. Now just coping with painful, tender boobs. But on the upside they are bigger!

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    • Posted

      Hi edel...id the same surgery as you 10.5 years ago and no one could have prepared me as it has and is hard. i think every persons experience is different and there is a large percentage of us that really struggle but it does get easier...

      im better and stronger but when you are in the thick of it...id dont know where i would. have been and would be without prayer....

      bless. CK

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  • Posted

    unfortunately my health, mental and physical has been worse since the menopause. No zest here! Breast cysts, anxiety, depression, mood swings, always tired, always aching body, more illnesses. Brain fog. Leg veins, loosing my waist. Besides all the usual hot flushes sometimes several in a row, drenched to the skin at work. I still get migraines! Sex without contraception. Yes, for those lucky to be in a long term relationship with a man who still appreciates them, when you

    are feeling up to it. If you are on your own and meeting a new man you still have to worry about condoms for std's. I don't have children , menopause confirmed i never would. I care for my elderly mother who has been going through cancer, so much for 'me time'. etc etc etc. sorry but life is so much worse for me now! At least when i had periods my pms was confined to certain days a month, now I struggle every day. You can tell today is a particularly bad one!!!!

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    • Posted

      Ah, yes, they forgot about the elderly parents in the article. I guess they are assuming they are either fit and healthy or already passed away! And, like you say, assume you are in a stable relationship. Because i had children late in life i have double dependency - elderly parents, with dementia, and school children. So, no 'me time'. On the upside, I think my kids are what motivated me to get up every day and keep going, and stopped me focusing on my problems - with them and my parents, I've had more important things to worry about (people who are dependent on me) than my hot flushes, extreme exhaustion, etc.

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  • Posted

    Hi suki

    Thanks for sharing. I had primary ovarian failure and so never started my periods, so had a lifetime without the monthlies, mood swings, headaches, unable to conceive so I adopted.... After reading the article it dawned on me that I should have been celebrating from age 16 - 42 before menopause kicked in 😂🤣 I am going to start immediately 😁 xx

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    • Posted

      Think your emojis may have been stolen, I'm sure the moderators are onto it 😂 sometimes humour is the only way to get through the tough times, if you don't laugh you'll cry and I've done plenty of both! Xx

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    • Posted

      I totally agree. But be careful, some women on these menopause discussion forums are a bit tetchy and don't appreciate a bit of humor to lighten all the doom and gloom. I have incurred the wrath of some ladies when I dared to make a joke about it. Of course it is not a laughing matter, but, like you say, a bit of humor goes a long way to helping us get through it.

      Hummmm, I was thinking of going out for a walk this evening but it is pouring with rain and blowing a gale outside and my cat is asleep on my lap ....... she looks soooo comfy, I can't possibly disturb her ..... 😉

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    • Posted

      Btw, not worried about my humour, we've had some opportunities to laugh on here should be okay. If you don't hear from me ive been arrested by a small section of the humour police x

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  • Posted

    Thanks for Positive post dear.

    There is light after big long dark tunnel of Menopause .

    Menopause is part of womanhood soo will all have to face .😭

    me happy atleast this site give little motivational and positive feeling .

    By reading other stories i feel little relaxed that i am not alone..we all r facing and exchanging tips and ideas to overcome it .

    i wish this phase will over soon for all

    tk

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