Thyroid Issues

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I am struggling with a thyroid problem. I went to my doctor last week because I have had a high heart rate betweem 120-140 for months for and wanted to have it checked. My ecg was normal aside from tachycardia. The dr told me to take 81 mg aspirin daily until they find out what it is. The doctor's office also took some blood to run tests. The next day I got a call saying that a simple test they ran showed something with my thyroid being 0.005. I'm assuming that's my t4. (I've probably researched it way too much in the past week anf my mom has hyperthyroidism.) They told me that they were going to have the lab do more extensive tests. I received another phone call the following week confirming that I had abnormal test results. I have a followup next week to go over my labs. I don't even know what exactly is wrong. (Hypo or hyper?) Not having an appointment until next week is starting to stress me out. I guess my real question is how do you deal with something like this? I'm 28 and have never had any medical problems except for having my tonsils and adenoids removed when I was 20. I'm really struggling with this emotionally because everyone seems to think it is okay to to just go on medication but I don't. I know I have to suck it up but that's the struggle I'm having. I know about thyroid storm etc and it sounds horrible. I've also read that by taking anyithyroid medication that it can make you hypo. Is that true? Is that permanent? Will it eventually fix itself and go away or is it permanent? Any answers would be great. Thanks!

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  • Posted

    The doctor also said that my thyroid felt enlarged when she touched it.
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    • Posted

      0.005 possibly is ur TSH. You could be showing symptoms of graves disease. I have been on anti thyroid medications since 1.5 years.now my T3 and T4 are normal although TSH is still low.
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    • Posted

      Hi Daku That is very interesting. By that I am referring to your tsh being low and T3 and T4 being normal. Hav they always bee normal> Have u hadany thyroid antibody tests doneat all?

       

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    • Posted

      No. I was hyper thyroid with all the classic symptoms of graves disease. Yes, have got all the tests done, even got my thyroid scan. I have been on carbimazole for 1.5 years now. So, my TSH level had shot beyond 10, while the max should not be more than 4.5, so they reduced my dose due to which TSH has come down again to 0.06 but T3 and T4 are normal.
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  • Posted

    I was diagnosed with hyper at 2014. Now 2016 my TSH is in normal range.  First off you know yourself other than any doctor.  My TSH was < 0 severe hyper... and was ask by endo to do RAI which I strongly told the endo "NO".  I've had thryoid storm and I've swing to hypo symptoms even though Im still hyper meaning my TSH still < 0.  Changes need to happen in your diet.  No more fast food, iodine, coffee that could trigger more hypo symptoms.  When you see ENdo ask also to test Vit D, magnesium, and Carnitine Deffieciencies...
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    • Posted

      typo:  Changes need to happen in your diet.  No more fast food, iodine, coffee that could trigger more hyper symptoms.  When you see ENdo ask also to test Vit D, magnesium, and Carnitine test Deffieciencies...
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  • Posted

    The 0.005 will be TSH not T4. You are hyperthyroid. Please do not be afraid of the drugs. You will most likely be started on carbimazole and possibly a beta blocker such as propranolol (although I was unable to take these). Carbimazole will reduce the production of T4 in your thyroid and after a few weeks your T4 and T3 levels should come down, therefore reducing your symptoms. Normally you have to stay on carbimazole for around 18 months although the dosage will be reduced and then finally stopped. A good proportion of people go into remission and never have to have any furtheer treatment, just regular blood tests. Hyperthyroidism can be a dangerous condition if left untreated because it can lead to heart failure and strokes, so you must take the medication offered to you. Good luck.
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  • Posted

    Hi krobo, being hyperthyroid means that your metabolism runs faster, your heart beats faster and also events that would normally trigger a minor emotional response are more likely to trigger a feeling of emergency or stress. When I was first diagnosed with hyperthyroidism it helped me to actively postprocess these emotions and shift them down on the 'acuteness scale'. In other words try to take it easy. It will not help you much to get stressed.

    The positive thing is that your GP has quickly identified a problem with your thyroid and will be able to help you further. First your GP and endocrinologist will have to find out what causes your thyroid to be overactive. 

    Depending on your thyroid levels you may be given medication to lower the thyroxine output of your thyroid. You will not become permanently hyperthyroid from taking thyroid lowering medication. On top of that during the first weeks of our treatment you will have more frequent blood tests that will pick up changes and your medication will be adjusted accordingly.   

     

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  • Posted

    Thanks for everyone's input! I'm definitely goimg to try to fix my diet and I will ask about any vitamin and mineral deficiencies when I go in. I am definitely nervous about having to take medication but I'll give it a try. I wouldn't want to take radioactive iodine as I have read it kills it. Once again, Thanks!
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    • Posted

      I find it difficult to believe that the doctor who discovered you had hyperthyroidism has not prescribed a beta blocker like Propranolol for you while they complete their tests to determine the cause.  That’s what my endocrinologist did for me at the time I was diagnosed.  You do not need to be afraid of going hypo while on medication because even if you did, it would be reversible.  When you have treatments like Radiation of the thyroid or surgery of the thyroid to treat this condition, that is when you go permanently hypo and it is not reversible, and it will require thyroid hormone replacement drugs for the rest of your life.  Many doctors will try the meds first and then push for the other two treatments if they don’t feel the meds work.  In my case, the meds normalized my excessive thyroid hormones but did nothing for my TSH or antibodies that were causing the disease.  That’s when I did a lot of research and found that hyperthyroid patients develop a lot of vitamin, mineral and amino acid deficiencies when they are running hyperthyroid and need to replace these.  So I started taking 3,000 mg of Regular L-Carnitine, 1,000 to 5,000 IU of Vitamin D and 200 mg a day of Magnesium Citrate.  I also take Omega 3 for the inflammation.   My TSH had remained at 0 for two years after I started treatment with meds and only after adding the supplements did it begin to rise.  So to get a head start, you can add these supplements before your work-up is final and you are prescribed meds.
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    • Posted

      I have not been told that I am hyper or hypo. I will be told that at my appoimtment so far. At my intial appointment (i haven't had my followup yet.) I was told tontake 81 mg aspirin daily and that was it. The np called me to update me next day to explain that one of my levels is 0.005. Aside from that I have no other info other than something is high and abnormal. They added more tests to my bloodwork. I basically got enough info in a small amount to make me stress about itm I'll ask about a beta blocker when I go. I haven't been to an endocrinologist yet but I'm assuming that's next.
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    • Posted

      * also, i have recently started taking a Multivitamin daily so hopefully it will help a bit. The only change I've had recently that I have even noticed is tachycardia 120 and up for my heart rate and my knees ache with stairs etc but that may be related to my job because it is highly physical.
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    • Posted

      The measurement of 0.005 is most likely your TSH (Thyroid stimulating hormone) which indicates hyperthyroidism.  Even if they do not know the cause, this is enough to tell them that you are hyperthyroid and that your palpitations and heart rate is due to this.
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    • Posted

      I see what you mean. I'll ask them. Luckily I don't have any palpitations just a tachycardic regular rhythm.
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