TKR soon

Posted , 11 users are following.

Looking for any tips and advice, I am on the waiting list for a TKR, my Consulant was not keen as I am only 60 and according to the X-ray don't quite have bone on bone, but following an MRI scan this option was then on the table.

Having had knee problems since I tore the cartilage almost 15 years ago, my knee has caused me a lot of pain from time to time, in the last few years that has become much more frequent, pain, stiffness and now no longer straightens correctly, I can no longer enjoy swimming or going to the gym as these activities cause a great deal of after pain, so I feel ready now to have something done about my knee, I have read lots of threads on here about what to expect, and I'm under no illusions that it's going to be tough, so any advice or tips from all you very friendly helpful people on this forum, would be very much appreciated, I'm quite an active person, I drive a manual car, it's my right knee.

Thank you in advance for reading my thread..

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  • Posted

    Hi Shirleyann

    I'm 58 and had tkr last September after lots of pain & cortisone injections , Go for it I'm not going 2 kid u it is a slow process but in my opinion it's worth it do your exercises and elevate and ice regularly and take your meds , I was on my exercise bike after 1 wk slowly turning the pedals , I'm back playing golf 4 times a wk and planning a 40 mile charity cycle ride u can do it be positive

    U will have good and bad days remember it's a very big operation but trust me you will benefit, work hard at your own pace good luck x

    Ps got 2 have other knee done soon nearly bionic

    Rob x

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  • Posted

    Hi Shirleyann hope you are well. I had a TKR last october i am only 54 years old ! I was bone on bone and a tore cartilage i had Injections in the bone of my knee that did not work and after lots of blood test and xray they give me a MRI Scan then  decided a new knee was best for me. I had  to give my job up as standing nearly killed me with the pain. I am so glad that i have had it done but it is very painfull after your operation i am 12 weeks  post op have been discharge from hospital and have one more pyhsio to go , in my self i feel great its still very painful its hard work  but it will be worth it, you will be able to go all the things you like doing ! The pyhsio is hard work but once you get the hang of it you will be away. Have you got a date yet ? Best wishes best of luck with your operation do every thing they say and you will be fine. I had fast track surgery went in on the monday at 11am and on tuesday at 5pm i was back home :0)
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    • Posted

      Hey Thank you Berylboos

      I only know it will be in the next 12 weeks, watch this space😜

      Im very good at doing what I'm told lol.

      thanks again, it's very reassuring to read such positive posts..

      shirley x

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  • Posted

    Hi Shirley Ann,  Good that you've been reading up on it all, but please don't forget that this is a group of people with knee problems.  You may have knee problems now, but I know people who've had TKR and life back to normal with no problems after 2 weeks.  So don't forget that.  You could well be one of those people especially if you've only got the one knee that needs TKR.  Don't give up on going to the pool.  Find a hydrotherapy pool and do hydrotherapy exercises, this will help now and after the op very much.  It's important to keep the strength up.  I've been doing hydrotherapy since my first TKR and also using it for rehab and prehab.  Doing the correct exercises will help you enormously.  See if you can see a physiotherapist who has hydrotherapy exercises for you.  If they haven't already, just laminate the sheets and have them at the pool with you. Don't think that because you need a TKR that you should just take it easy, this is where the hard work begins. You'll definitely have improvement.  The other thing is to go to hydrotherapy nearly every day.  After the TKR, once it's settled down a bit re-commence the hard work.  This isn't a passive op and it's go and work hard op lol.   All the best and let us know how you're going

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    • Posted

      Cheryl thank you, I have just called the physio and got an appointment, I will ask about the hydrotherapy exercises, in the meantime I will google to see if I can find something, I take my dogs to hydrotherapy but never thought about myself lol.  Yes I'm understanding very quickly about the hard work needed to the road to recovery, lol.

      I will be posting on my progress, thank you so much for your straight talking post 🤗Made me buck up xx

       

      Shirley x

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  • Posted

    I've read through the other comments so will try not to duplicate.  Before the operation, try to build up muscle not only in the leg which needs the operation, but also in upper boy, as using crutches to begin with is quite hard work.  Exercises with the leg. . lifting it when lying down etc. will help to strengthen the muscles in the leg too and aid recovery.  Make sure you have things in place for when you return. if possible, a comfortable chair which is not too low, an over the toilet seat to make getting up and down easier, a cross body l freezer bags or a freezer cuff, a large bag for carrying small articles around while using crutches, some very soft and comfortable jogging bottoms, perhaps some extra pillows, . . I found velvet the most comfortable . .  paper plates and glasses to avoid too much washing up, ready made meals in the freezer a pair of shoes larger than you usually wear as your foot may very well be swollen, and decent pain killers.  If you are in the UK, they may prescribe these for you anyway, and in the USA I'm sure they do, but I would check it out before as I was expected to survive on paracetamol, and it's no fun.  As it's a manual car, and your right knee, it may take a little longer to get back to driving than with an automatic. . .I'm trying to work out which is the braking leg on a right hand drive. . . Ah, the left leg, so that's good!  Of course, if you are on really strong tablets, that would also be an imediment to driving. . . Someone did mention, and I second that, that there are probably more people on this site with a difficult recovery from the knee operation, as it is precisely those who will look for a forum, so you may be one of the luckyt ones who sails through it will little problems. However, there will obviously be a period when you need to push yourself to do the exercises, and I believe that absolutely nobody escapes that!  If you are asked to use blood thinning drugs after the op you may feel the cold more, depending on the time of year.  You probably will curse having had the operation done for a week or two, but hang in there and you will be glad in the long term!  Best of luck, and hope they don't keep you on the waiting list for too long. . . 

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  • Posted

    Hi Shirley

    I finally had TKR on Nov. 21 after years of living with a bad knee. Healing is going well but one thing they won't tell you is that you basically don't sleep for a couple months after the operation. Two months out and I am finally getting several hours in a row. Before that I was lucky to sleep more than an hour without waking up.

    Before you have the surgery, you can buy time by getting cortisone injections. They don't work great for everyone but they worked great for me. I was bone on bone and could barely walk up stairs. The first cortisone injection made my knee feel the best it had in more than 10 years. It lasted for three months. Then I had another and that lasted another three months, up to the operation. Cortisone is my new favorite drug and it defintely bought me time.  

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    • Posted

      Hey Rocco

      Thanks for the reply, I will bare in mind what your saying about the sleep 😴Although when my knee is really bad (normally following to much activity) it gets really stiff through the night and causes disturbed sleep pattern, I would imagine that to be much worse following the op. I have had steroid injections in the past, your right they can help a little, will be worth asking about in the meantime.

      Hope your recovery continues to go well.

      Regards

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  • Posted

    Hi Shirleyann,

    You are obviously in the U.K. I was told at 56 I was too young!! So I waited until 63 to have it done. Where are you over here?

    I'm not sugar-coating it, but after the first 3 weeks I have improved weekly, apart from the bend! I can bend enough to go up & down stairs! So am getting along well. There are good days & bad days, but on the whole I am so glad I had TKR as I DO NOT have the pain of arthritis in that knee any more. I have dull aches if on my feet for a long time, that is nothing in comparison!

    Go in expecting the best outcome, there will be pitfalls but someone on here can give you advice, or let you vent!! Lol

    Prepare as per suggestions already posted.

    One suggestion I would have would be see a chiropractor the month before the operation. This will ensure your nervous system is in the best condition it can be & your spine is properly aligned. I did that, & have been back weekly since 3 months after TKR. My arms & spine really needed adjustments due to using crutches & 'learning' to walk again!

    Don't worry too much about what you read on here, as there are thousands of people worldwide who have TKR & some sail through! We are all individuals & some are genuinely unlucky to have problems.

    But make no bones (pun?!) about it, this is a brutal operation do not take it lightly! You are wise to do research!

    Good luck, I hope you don't have too long to wait for your op. Have they given you an approximation of timescale?

    Keep in touch.

    All the best

    Marilyn

    XX

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    • Posted

      Hi Marilyn

      Thank you for your reassuring post, yes I am in the UK, I never thought about seeing a chiropractor that's a good idea, like yourself it has taken a long time to get to this point, but of course now the anxiousness sets in, am I doing the right thing is the first question you find yourself asking, and I suppose because I don't have bone on bone and therefor not as debilitating as someone who can barely walk, I feel a little guilty that I am having this surgery, but then I'm sure the consultant would just have refused to allow me to have it.

      I have really read up on what to expect as well as stats on recovery and your right it's now such common place for this surgery worldwide, and of course everyone is different, I am a really positive person and always very determined, I did watch the whole operation on you tube, lol, that was an eye opener 😳 In a positive way! 😂.

      the time scale they have given is within the next 12 weeks, I go for a pre assessment this week so I'm kinda hoping it will be within the next 4 -6 weeks, can I ask what anaesthetic you went with?

      Anyway, thanks again Marilyn and I will keep in touch.

      kind regards

      Shirley

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    • Posted

      Hi Shirleyann

      Do not feel guilty! You know how it is here, if you weren't needing it, you wouldn't be having it!

      I watched the op on you tube too! It takes a lot of the uncertainty out as you know what to expect.

      I was on Enhanced Recovery Programme so had no choice as to anaesthetic! I had spinal block, with light sedation & anaesthetic into joint.

      If you are offered spinal go for it! You are awake throughout but nicely drowsy, I listened to my iPod, so as not to hear what was going on. I was wide awake at the end, ate & drank. If you are early on the list you will be got out of bed & even walking. Unfortunately I was one of the last on the list & also became shivery, so was kept in recovery longer. Didn't get onto ward until after 22.00! There were signs everywhere about letting staff know if you are cold, I assume in case of shock.

      I am in Hertfordshire where are you?

      I hope your op is soon

      Marilyn

      XX

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    • Posted

      Ok, so spinal is the way to go lol, that scared me more than the op itself! But it makes sense for the start of a quicker recovery right from the off.

      Im in Scotland just outside Edinburgh.

      i will have my iPod charged and at the ready, I don't want to hear a thing 🙉🙈..Thank you x

      shirley xx

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    • Posted

      May be nicely drowsy in the UK . . in my hospital, here in Tenerife, I was totally awake, and it is a little disurbing to hear everything wihich is going on, together with their chitchat about the weekend, etc. etc.  I would prefer to be drowsy.  perhaps it is standard practise in the UK . . . The spinal injection itself is really nothing to worry about though . . . Not sure if my tingling and burning feet have been caused by it though . .but of course, it could be unconnected.
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