Torn Mescius Cartilage

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Hi. Has anyone else been offered APOStherapy for a torn cartilage with no other underlying symptoms (osteoarthritis or similar). I would like some views on this as all the testimonies appear to be sponsored by the company and patients have arthritis that happen to have a torn cartilage but not suffering from any of the symptoms (like so many people according to my Consultant). Just the arthritis classic joint issues.

Thank you.

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  • Posted

    Is this the treatment through some sort of special footwear. I've recently seen some ads on it from a specialty treatment company. One of those, a new York based firm. As it seems to only pertain to an ailment unlike mine and being 1500 miles from time I didn't waste time looking. I guess you could google and see what it says.
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    • Posted

      Hi. Thank you. But that's the problem, all searches on Google were sponsored by APOS therapy. Rather biased I thought so was hoping to gain some unbiased comments from actual users of the shoes.
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  • Posted

    I have read their online blurb and it all sounds very confusing. If, for arguments sake you are having non-specific pain, then this company sounds ideal. Torn cartilage cannot repair itself. The damaged piece would normally be cut away otherwise it gets stuck in places that makes movement a chore.  The same goes when you have bone on bone.  It cannot heal itself.  What this company is saying (my opinion) is they can relieve your pain by changing your gait ie the way you walk, this is great if you have back pain or knees that do not have torn cartilage, or any form of arthritis.

    At the end of the day it is down to you, this treatment is non-invasive, but at some point in the future you are going to have to consider invasive surgery. If your cartilage is torn; it will get worse before it gets better, putting off the inevitable is a convenience thing.

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    • Posted

      Thank you for your comments. I suffered a severe tear a year ago which required the standard Arthroscopy surgery. Made a full recovery in a very short period of time. Then 8 months later whilst walking up the stairs knee gave way with a searing pain shooting down the outside of the knee. Starting at the top of the bone. Subsequent GP referral back to Consultant (usual waiting time) MRI (usual waiting time) slight tear diagnosed where the previous year had been cut back. Made great friends with my sofa for the past 3 months as unable to walk/drive any distance. Now offered this APOS but would have to wait 'up to 3 months to notice a reduction in pain, if at all!' I just can't get my head around how a pair of shoes can 'cure' a physical tear but totally understand the relief it may offer for back and other unexplained joint pain. As posture can have a detrimental affect on joints as well as excess weight. I'm not overweight and only 49. Now been left for another 2 weeks with no treatment until a decision is made of I'm a candidate. Feel I maybe be pushed into this lengthy (with no guarantee) treatment. And left if I don't accept it! Physio has nothing to lose as he will be paid no matter what the outcome will be. As I had an assessment 3 days ago. Just leaving me in more pain than ever.
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    • Posted

      My mind is always leaning toward the cynical side when I hear of stuff like this, especially with letters like this attached to it. The 1st thing that comes to mind with an acronym like APOS is, "A Piece of S**t". But then again I've never been accused of being very smart. In The bUS we have a company called "the good feet store". Their deal is to do a lot of very specific measuring and build a pair of inserts for your shoes that cure all of your pain etc. The ads sound like they have you walking in the clouds. I only know one person that has actually have bought them and other than the weight they lost .......in their wallet ........they haven't seen much effect. Apparently the pass US codes but of course insurance doesnt pay a penny so you really wonder. I guess when you have knee/leg pain like most on here have experienced you are ready to grasp at any straw in the wind.
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  • Posted

    I went to check it out at Kings Cross in London. All it is as Sue said is they give you shoes with studs at the bottom which changes your gait so you're putting less pressure on the bit that hurts. The shoes are big and clunky and  have to be worn indoors for half an hour everyday  so you have to walk around in them in your house! They're supposed to train your knees. I would have tried it as I have tried EVERYTHING but the cost was a joke. I think it was a few thousand pounds - perhaps 5K. It's an Israeli company. They advertise on the radio constantly so they do a lot of business. I beleive if you have private insurance it would  cover the cost.I ended up having to have TKR which I think in the end is the only solution for most chronic knee issues. x
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    • Posted

      Thank you. I'm a public patient but apparently my surgeon says the hospital will fund the treatment if I'm deemed a candidate!!. I keep thinking 'money is talking' rather than outcome. Local hospital have a very long waiting list, compounded with a Cobsultant leaving without notice a few weeks back. I have tried calling APOS direct and they come across as being evasive and just kept repeating 'no two patients are the same that's why it's tailor made' but no guarantee was given either. 3 more months of pain and 'life on hold' seems too much to bear. Not that I want surgery if I can help it. But do want results or at least pain relief.
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    • Posted

      Oh wow.  Sounds like they have a financial deal in place with the consultant.  Can you not go back to your GP and ask to see someone else?  If that is not possible, get them to write a letter saying that this particular treatment does not seem to have your best interests at heart.  It may be new age”. I’m all for new things but…..   Sweetie, you should not be putting your life on hold.  Go ahead with the surgery; it’s 2 tiny holes in your knee and then you are up and about.  It will be a little painful, but nowhere near what you are in at present. You will heal and be back play sport, walking or whatever.  No-one likes operations, all that being knocked out, not in control.  All sorts of things buzz through your head, but you know, you come through it.  Before you know it you are in recovery waiting to be taken back to the ward, I have taken the liberty of copying the following for key hole surgery

      QUOTE (Introduction 

      An arthroscopy is a type of keyhole surgery used both to diagnose and treat problems with joints.

      It'smost commonly used on the knees, ankles, shoulders, elbows, wrists and hips.

      An arthroscopy involves the use of a device called an arthroscope to examine the joints. This is a thin, metal tube about the length and width of a drinking straw that contains a light source and a camera. Images are sent from the arthroscope to a video screen or an eyepiece, so the surgeon is able to see inside the joint.

      It's also possible for tiny surgical instruments to be used alongside an arthroscope to allow the surgeon to treat certain joint conditions.

      As the equipment used during an arthroscopy is so small, only minor cuts need to be made in the skin. This means the procedure has some potential advantages over traditional, "open" surgery, including:

      less pain after the operation 

      faster healing time

      lower risk of infection

      you can often go home the same day

      you may be able to return to normal activities more quickly

      Why it's used

      An arthroscopy might be recommended if you have problems such as persistent joint pain, swelling or stiffness, and scans have not been able to identify the cause.

      An arthroscopy can also be used to treat a range of joint problems and conditions. For example, it can be used to:

      repair damaged cartilage

      remove fragments of loose bone or cartilage

      drain away any excess fluid

      treat conditions such as arthritis, frozen shoulder or carpal tunnel syndrome

      What happens during an arthroscopy?

      The arthroscope is inserted through a small cut in the skin made next to the joint. Further small incisions may also be made to allow an examining probe or surgical instruments to be inserted.

      Your surgeon will then examine the inside of the joint using the arthroscope and, if necessary, remove or repair any problem areas.

      This will usually be done under general anaesthetic, although sometimes a spinal or local anaesthetic is used.

      The procedure is usually performed as a day case, which means you'll normally be able to go home on the same day as the surgery.

      Recovering from an arthroscopy

      The time it takes to recover from an arthroscopy can vary, depending on the joint involved and the specific procedure you had.

      It's often possible to return to work and light, physical activities within a few weeks, but more demanding physical activities such as lifting and sport may not be possible for several months.

      Your surgeon or care team will advise you how long it's likely to take to fully recover and what activities you should avoid until you're feeling better. UNQUOTE

       

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    • Posted

      Thank you, I had the arthroscopy last year after a traumatic fall had resulted in a severe tear. I made a full recovery, or so I thought. Then Bam 8 months later out of the blue I suffered a further tear. No other surgeon available. I do not have the best relationship with the local hospital (long story) and feel I'm being "fobbed off". Not confident it meets my needs and feel that if this therapy was so brilliant why dont they offer it to all patients with joint and back pain without a direct cause. It could certainly take the pressure off the local pain clinic and reduce the pharmacutical bill  whilst offering those patients some relief where an exact diagnosis is unknown. Thank you. Its just another part of my ageing body that is giving up on me!! 

       

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    • Posted

      Noooooo you cannot blame your age……I refuse to admit that my wonky bits are down to age.  Keep up the good fight, don’t get too down.  If it gets too much, invest in a splint, (very very old school) it will support your whole leg by immobilising it, but it will enable you to get around relatively pain free + it is only for a short while
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  • Posted

    What amazed me about Apostherapy is they were not interested in any individual issues -as far as they are concerned the shoe fits everyone! That is why they say every individual is different because they know that with people with bone on bone etc the shoe can never work but they don't check this out BEFOREHand. If you do try it please keep us informed. I hope it works for you because surgery is no walk in the park  x
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    • Posted

      Thank you. My first Arthroscopy was 'a walk in the park' (excuse the pun) but felt like it, within 3 days walking unaided. 5 physio sessions later I had made a fabulous recovery. A friend had the same surgery a month ago. Used to run marathons (I never have) and still has to use crutches and having physio! So I am grateful for that. Hence why I was so shocked when it all went horribly wrong 8 months later.

      😕

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    • Posted

      Hi

      I foolishly tried Apos therapy as I was terrified of having a knee replacement. I had severe end stage arthritus and I was bone on bone. Common sense should have told me that it would not work but I felt that I should exhaust all possibilities before going down the surgery route. I don't think there is anything that can take the bone on bone pain away apart from surgery. Obviously, your case is different but I regret my decision to take part in Apos therapy and needless to say it cost me a fortune.

      I had a knee replacement 6 months ago and I am very pleased with the outcome.

      It is amazing that they have now changed their philosophy and promote Apos for patients after a knee replacement to build up muscle strength again. I did not bother with this though and totally regret my decision to get involved with them in the first place.

      Maybe the shoes would be beneficial for patients with mild arthritus but I did not fall into this category.

      Good luck with your treatment.

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    • Posted

      Sorry to hear that (good reason for me asking the question) but pleased that you appear to be making a good recovery. I have bought leather MBT shoes many years ago as I had a very active job, still going strong now. At just over £100 (depending on style) mine looked like office rather than trainer shoes I would really recommend those shoes which may well help a person post op knee replacement as they are so sturdy and supportive. So very important unlike regular footwear. They certainly strengthen and train muscles. 😉
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