worried..help!

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I've been taking buspar for about two months and was doing great I take it three times a day with food. Monday I woke up with the stomach flu. I took my meds like I was supposed to only with no food today is Wednesday and I am eat up with anxiety. My question is has anyone else ever had this problem and how long before I get straight again. Some reassurance please I'm getting so discouraged and tired

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  • Posted

    I did take Buspar for a while.  I'm a layman but with the flu, my thoughts are the medicine may have passed through your system without diseminating to where it needed to go.  My other thought is when I'm sick my guts aren't right and it does affect my anxiety levels.  This may sound strange but sometimes a movement... will help to decrease the anxiety.  I had a nurse practicioner explain it that all your bodily functions are tied together and when something's out of whack (possibly your stomach and intestines where medicine is taken for use in the body because of the flu or an illness) everything doesn't function as well.  Call you doc's office and ask.  If anything, I'm sure you'll get a calming answer so you know it'll work out.  Many times this type of professional information can lessen the anxiety level and to know you'll be okay and you're having a normal response.
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    • Posted

      Thanks I take wellbutrin and celexa also that's why I'm concerned but in reality I try to keep telling myself that all the medicines couldn't have stopped at the same time (hopefully) not to mention I have been idle and we all know an idle mind is the devils playground
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    • Posted

      Amen, and that's the truth about an idle mind.  I can usually get past by thinking about hobbies.  I used to watch a show where this guy wanted a simpler life.  He moved out to the country, raised his own gardens and stock, and the show gave a great picture of his daily triumphs and not so much things.  For some reason I can start thinking about that show (can't even remember the guy's face anymore) and all the negative thoughts, worries, and anxiety triggers go away.  I'm sure you have something that just makes you feel good thinking about.  By the way, I was on those two meds at the same time as Buspar also.  Sadly, I was on a few others at the time too.  It seemed like every time I went to my doc he would add a new medicine based on my current symptoms and always told me to continue the meds I was already taking.  It finally got nuts but I understand how it gets that way because people like me would do anything to have their lives back to "normal."  If you can say you're better than you were a week ago, month ago, year ago, that's okay because you're getting better.  Anxiety is a long haul and though bad stuff is so profound sometimes, but looking back it feels great to know you past it and are not feeling it today.  Good luck as you battle through.
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    • Posted

      Thanks I feel like its all from bring down and sick and not being able to get up and go versus choosing to sit and watch movies on a Sunday with the family its all a mind thing hardest thing for me to do is get up and move around I'm a dweller always have been
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    • Posted

      You know in doing research to try and get better I ran upon a chart done by some research hospital. I thought it was the Mayo Clinic but I can't be sure.  Basically, they interviewed 7,000 people who had anxiety for over 4-5 years and asked what helped the most, least, etc.  The end product was a scatter diagram of the top 40 things that helped and the higher the cluster the more people chose that item as the best results.  The chart really stunned me at the time.  There wasn't a psych med until #7.  The reason I was shocked is because I just knew at the time it was some kind of chemical imbalance in my brain and also just knew the right med would be prescribed and I'd be cured.  Looking back now, I realize the chart was right and I was using bad logic.  At the time I was taking the meds you noted and also a few benzodiazapines (klonopin, and xanax).  A third was ativan for quick relief as needed.  As it turns out benzo's are the worst thing over the long haul for anxiety because there will be a day of reckoning.  My day was rough and I had changed for the worse and ended up in a mental ward against my will for a 3-day observation period.  Thankfully, that happened because it got me off everything and I was able to start over with more control on my part.  No more Mr. Compliant; I questioned the logic for everything and especially the side effects of meds.  My docs had to know and think out the course before we agreed on a route. What I found was we're all different and react in a wide range of outcomes, and Dr's in general do not have as good of grasp as they wish they could have for treating anxiety.  I took charge of my getting better. 

      Back to the chart. The number one item was activity.  The more exercise people did (within reason) they felt the most progress was made.  I believe meditation was number 2.  The chart made me realize meds are not the be all - end all.  They're a piece to help you overcome something big.  I'm still on meds; beta blocker to stop the racing heart; an onset for me for anxiety attacks.  mirtazapine to help me sleep and help brought down the constant high level of anxiety throughout the next day, and the third a benzo, Ativan.  Ativan is the one I consider the most dangerous.  I'm prescribed up to 4 - 1mg tablets a day as needed, but over the last two years I may have averaged 2 - 1mg tablets a week total.  It's good if you need to break a high anxiety cycle.  The most dangerous because it is addictive for the body and getting off is tough when you have anxiety.  Anyhow, good luck in your battle...

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