Urine Infection in Older People - Treatment

Authored by Dr Mary Harding, 24 Mar 2016

Patient is a certified member of
The Information Standard

Reviewed by:
Dr Laurence Knott, 24 Mar 2016

  • A course of an antibiotic medicine will usually clear the infection quickly. You should see a doctor if your symptoms are not gone, or nearly gone, after a few days.
  • Paracetamol or ibuprofen will usually ease any pain, discomfort, or high temperature (fever).
  • An underlying cause such as an enlarged prostate or constipation may be found and need treatment.

Note: if you have an infection of your bladder (cystitis) then having plenty to drink is traditional advice to flush out the bladder. However, there is no proof that this is helpful when you have cystitis. Some doctors feel that it does not help and that drinking lots may just cause more toilet trips, giving you more unnecessary pain. Therefore, it is difficult to give confident advice on whether to drink lots or just to drink normally when you have mild symptoms of cystitis. However, if you have a high temperature (fever) and/or feel unwell, having plenty to drink helps to prevent having a lack of fluid in your body (dehydration).

Most people improve within a few days of starting treatment. See a doctor if you do not quickly improve. If your symptoms do not improve despite taking an antibiotic medicine then you may need an alternative antibiotic. This is because some germs (bacteria) are resistant to some types of antibiotics. This can be identified from tests done on your urine sample.

Unfortunately, there are few proven ways to prevent urine infections. No evidence has been found for traditional advice given, such as drinking cranberry juice or the way you wipe yourself.

There are some measures which may help in some cases:

  • It makes sense to avoid constipation, by eating plenty of fibre (such as fruit) and drinking enough fluid.
  • Older women with atrophic vaginitis may wish to consider hormone replacement creams or pessaries. These have been shown to help prevent urine infections.
  • If there is an underlying medical problem, treatment for this may stop urine infections occurring.
  • For some people with recurring urine infections, a low dose of antibiotic taken continuously may be prescribed.

Further reading and references

I'm 23 and have had trouble with Kidney infections all my life. When i was little i had trouble with wetting the bed until i was 8years old. All my life i've had infections, some urine but mostly...

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