900 milligram daiy morphine dose

Posted , 5 users are following.

This discussion has been locked due to a period of inactivity. Start a new discussion

Iam a 50 year old female wh stage 4 COPD in a hospice fiacility...Iave been here two months and the doctor ust prescribed an additional 180milligram daily dosage of morpine....I now receive 260 milligam morphine dose every 8 hous and also have PRN order for liqudmorphine "as needed"....I am in arug induced stupor most of the time....I thought If morphine dosages rsulted in heavy drowsinss,they were not to be aministered....this seems crazy....are thesepeople committing euthanasia by morphine?

2 likes, 7 replies

Report

7 Replies

  • Posted

    Morphine/Oramorph can make you sleepy and feel drowsy, it is a very high dose for morphine. (I know this as it made my grandma sleepy after she had major surgery and i looked after her and gave her meds which was oramorph) 

     

    Report
  • Posted

    Hospice care is a different approach to care. The focus of care shifts from a rehabilitative approach to care to a palliative approach. This means there primary focus is to keep you comfortable with the least invasive means as possible. The scheduled doses of Morphine are long acting meaning they are intended to stay in the system for a longer period of time...the "as needed" morphine is for breakthrough pain. Most patients on hospice for COPD do not necessarily have pain but they struggle with breathing...Morphine works very well with the air hunger that COPD patients struggle with. If you are struggling to breathe obviously you are not comfortable....So....I am presuming this is what you are being medicated for....unfortunately taking morphine to control the air hunger has other side effects...like stupor as you mention and sleeping more...but this is not concerning to hospice because they want you comfortable even if that means the other...hospice is about comfort and quality vs quantity of days or months left...As long as the increased doses are needed to control the symptoms it is justified and legal....however, you should be in agreement with them changes to your medications as well. Feel free to ask anything else...I am a former hospice RN.

    Report
    • Posted

      yousound like a spokesman for the hospice industry...I knew youere probably a nurse after your first sentnce I was hoping to get an objcective reply from a patient...
      Report
    • Posted

      Sorry didnt mean to come across like a spokesman giving a hospice pitch..I just thought I was respectfully helping to alleviate your concern...Best wishes
      Report
    • Posted

      Crystal, I"got" where you're coming from. You stated the factual reasons the hospice have this person on such a high dose of morphine. Forest comes across as a very sound minded individual. His/her post was intelligently written and totally understandable. It sounds like he's uncomfortable with having that much morphine administered on a routine basis.

      Report
  • Posted

    Hi Forest! Why not simply tell the dr and nurses to lower your morphine dose to something more tolerable so you can feel alert and awake? Maybe you cld have a family member speak up for you....I'm willing to bet they'll not force more narcotics on you than you ask for. You certainly seem of sound mind! Please let us know how you're doing!

    Report
  • Posted

    I am saddened to hear of your situation. I imagine the morphine is prescribed to ease your difficulty breathing with stage 4 COPD and that it is resulting in over sedation or a morphine fog.

    As someone previously treated by the hospice myself and currently trying to get of fentanyl ( a very strong man made opiod ), there is always someone in the pain team you can speak to about your symptoms and medication. It does seem that you are being over opiatised and with discussion with your Drs you should see about reducing the dose and perhaps increasing your mental awareness. Studies have shown Morphine may significantly improve breathing in COPD in some but in does have serious side effects and it benefits only a selected number of patients. With this in mind you really need to speak to your prescribing Dr and say exactly what you have said here. Only then will you feel you have more control and perhaps more alert if the medication is reduced/ changed. No offence will be taken. Their concern is only to make you comfortable which you clearly are not. Research shows morphine does not benefit all COPD sufferers. If you feel you need support have a family member be there when you speak to the Dr.

    I really feel for you at this very difficult time. Please let us know how you are doing. Lots of hugs.

    Report

Join this discussion or start a new one?

New discussion

Report as inappropriate

Thanks for your help!

We want the forums to be a useful resource for our users but it is important to remember that the forums are not moderated or reviewed by doctors and so you should not rely on opinions or advice given by other users in respect of any healthcare matters. Always speak to your doctor before acting and in cases of emergency seek appropriate medical assistance immediately. Use of the forums is subject to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy and steps will be taken to remove posts identified as being in breach of those terms.

newnav-down newnav-up