Left side Pain

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Hi All,

I'm hoping someone can help me here.

Since new year I have been experiencing alot of lower pelvic and stomach pain, I have been backwards and forwards to the doctors, they have finally said I have IBS. I have been given Mebervine and Laxido as I am often constipated.

However the past month I have developed a pain in my left hand side below my ribs when I swallow food it feels like a stabbing pain, I only get this when I swallow solid food not liquids. I have been to the doctors about this a couple of times and they have told me they really do not have any idea what it is but doesnt sound anything serious. I am now at my whit ends trying to put up with it, some days it can be worse than others, some days it doesnt happen at all.

Can anyone shed any light what could be causing this pain??

Thanks

Sarah

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6 Replies

  • Posted

    Hi Sarah,

    The first thing I would say to you is change doctors!! A doctor that says "they really do not have any idea what it is but doesnt sound anything serious."

    If I were you I would ask to see another doctor or failing that ask your current doctor to refer you for a Colonoscopy, or an Endoscopy at least! You should really see a Consultant at your hospital, because there are various scans that can be done to see what is causing the pain.

    Constipation doesn't necessarily mean you have constipation either, there is a known problem called "over-flow" this means you suffer from Constipation and also get diarrhea.

    This certainly needs checkiing ASAP.

    Regards,

    Les.

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    • Posted

      Hi Les,

      Thanks for your reply. It wasn't just one doctor that said that I've been to see a couple at my surgery who all say they do not know what could be causing it!

      I don't get diarrhea it's very rare I get this, always seem to be blocked up!

      I think I may have to get a referral and go private to get seen as it's really bugging me now!!

      Thanks

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    • Posted

      Hi Sarah,

      That would be a good idea, normally a CT Scan is first, then maybe a Colonoscopy or an Endoscopy. In some cases they will also go to MRI and an Ultrasound, but this depends on the results from previous scans.

      You may have blood tests done but this is standard, to see if you have any infections anywhere.

      Regards,

      Les.

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    • Posted

      Hi Les,

      I have had the blood tests done and they all came back normal.

      I've just made an appointment to go back to see my doctor next week, we will see what happens!!

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    • Posted

      Hi Sarah,

      Well, that's a start I guess - but blood tests can give false/positive results, most of the time they are okay though.

      Well, good luck and I hope it is not anything serious.

      Regards,

      Les.

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  • Posted

    Firs of all just because you have other diagnosis does not mean the doctor can lump them into one category and say" Hmmn we really don't know and we hope it gets better." They are supposed to refer you to a specialist. This sounds like an emergency situation. 

    You would need an Ear, nose and throat doctor, one of the oldest medical professions. You can look it up on WHAT DO OTOLARYNGOLOGISTS TREAT

    What is difficulty swallowing (dysphagia)?

    Difficulty swallowing is also called dysphagia. It is usually a sign of a problem with your throat or esophagus  —the muscular tube that moves food and liquids from the back of your mouth to your stomach. Although dysphagia can happen to anyone, it is most common in older adults, babies, and people who have problems of the brain or nervous system.

    There are many different problems that can prevent the throat oresophagus from working properly. Some of these are minor, and others are more serious. If you have a hard time swallowing once or twice, you probably do not have a medical problem. But if you have trouble swallowing on a regular basis, you may have a more serious problem that needs treatment.

    What causes dysphagia?

    Normally, the muscles in your throat and esophagus squeeze, or contract, to move food and liquids from your mouth to your stomach without problems. Sometimes, though, food and liquids have trouble getting to your stomach. There are two types of problems that can make it hard for food and liquids to travel down your esophagus:

    The muscles and nerves that help move food through the throat and esophagus are not working right. This can happen if you have:

    Had a stroke or a brain or spinal cord injury.

    Certain problems with your nervous system, such as post-polio syndrome, multiple sclerosis, muscular dystrophy, or Parkinson's disease.

    An immune system problem that causes swelling (orinflammation) and weakness, such as polymyositis ordermatomyositis.

    Esophageal spasm. This means that the muscles of the esophagus suddenly squeeze. Sometimes this can prevent food from reaching the stomach.

    Scleroderma. In this condition, tissues of the esophagus become hard and narrow. Scleroderma can also make the lower esophageal muscle weak, which may cause food and stomach acid to come back up into your throat and mouth.

    Something is blocking your throat or esophagus. This may happen if you have:

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). When stomach acid backs up regularly into your esophagus, it can cause ulcers in the esophagus, which can then cause scars to form. These scars can make your esophagus narrower.

    Esophagitis. This is inflammation of the esophagus. This can be caused by different problems, such as GERD or having an infection or getting a pill stuck in the esophagus. It can also be caused by an allergic reaction to food or things in the air.

    Diverticula. These are small sacs in the walls of the esophagus or the throat.

    Esophageal tumors. These growths in the esophagus may becancerous or not cancerous.

    Masses outside the esophagus, such as lymph nodes, tumors, orbone spurs on the vertebrae that press on your esophagus.

    dry mouth can make dysphagia worse. This is because you may not have enough saliva to help move food out of your mouth and through your esophagus. A dry mouth can be caused by medicines or another health problem.

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