5 days on Mirtazapine 15 mg. Still depressed. How long before it takes effect?

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I have been in depression for quite a few years now with one adversity following other. Have been on Mirtazapine 15 mg for 5 days now. How long does it take to show benefits?

Resorted to meditation for healing self and keep myself going personally and financially. Now felt unable to carry on and felt like doing something drastic.

Went to the doctor last week to tryy out medication and was prescribed Mirtazapine 15 mg.

Slept well the 1st day but was restless the next. Hit the treadmill in the evenings from 3rd day for the fear of staying awake and the mind wandering. This helped me tire out and sleep, but feel totally down, frustrated, hopeless and angry during the day. 

 

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  • Posted

    I started on mirt 7.5mg and after a week increased to 15mgs so all in all been on it for 2 weeks. I am still struggling but when I look back I am better than I was two weeks ago. It makes me quite tired during the day which is a bit annoying but I try to ignore it as I have read the side effects can wear off after a while. I think it's a question of time and maybe like me we may have to increase the dose to 30 mgs shortly let me no how u are today 
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    • Posted

      Not feeling great though, but good to hear you are feeling better after 2 weeks. So all in all I need to wait and watch for a couple of more days I guess.The doctor had mentioned that the need to be on mirt for at least a month to see the effects. Just wondering if it has helped anyone sooner.
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  • Posted

    Hi, I'm feeling similar to you. Been on & off meds for 15years, now on my 5th. There are other threads about it on here, if you do a search you can find other Mirt users to talk to. I've started it 7 days ago & it does make me a bit angry. I feel like it's taken the edge a bit off my anxiety & obsessive thoughts already but these drugs take at least 14-28days to take full effect. My suicidal ideation is still present but in the backdround. I've been tearful most days when I'd manged to get over that for a while. Stick with it but keep talking on here, there are lots of us fellow sufferers to discuss your feeling with. 
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  • Posted

    Hey there I can totally empathise with u. I was were u are this time last year. Was put on 15 Mirt initially then up to 30 . I had awful Sid effects tiredness worsening depression etc but it took a good ten weeks to settle and a good three months to feel kinda normal again.  11 months down the line I'm back to wrk full time bak at gym and life is good . Quite often when we're in despair and trust me I've been there we look for a quick fix (and rightly so) because mental health is so debilitating but if u can hang in there it's a great med for me and I'm so well now I forget done days to take my med . I hope u gt some relief soon take care.
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  • Posted

    I would have thought that you want to give it longer.

    Maybe write down your experiences each day so that you can look back at how it effects you and then if necessary show it to your doctor.

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  • Posted

    It takes two weeks to get into the system properly. You Dr may increase it to 30mg.

    It works foe me and keeps me balanced. I am on 45mg.

    Keep with it,it takes time xx

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  • Posted

    Fro nwhat I have read after starting a 15mg dose you normally feel some relief after 7-14 days. That said, 15mg is usually only a starting dose and you may have it incraesed to 30mg if you need it after 2 weeks. Either way make sure you go back to the gp and give an update and discuss your options at around 2 weeks.

    Have you been offered any talking therapy (councilling, cbt etc). Meds help but a 2 pronged approach is normally better. If your triiger was personnal circomstances and problems your reacting to it may help to talk it through with someone 'outside' of the situatrion/s who is not envolved.

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    • Posted

      My experience is totally the opposite of what Tony says. I was started on 30 mg but I found the sedative effect far too great but with the advice of my GP.s partner used to cut the 30 mg pill in half to take 15 mg. I have to say that if I had gone to my GP he would said that is what my pdoc siad ie 30 mg. That is one reason that I changed him - he just echoed what my psychiatrist said. He didn't take note of any possible side-effects.
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    • Posted

      Hope the 15mg dose helps in some time. Havent been recommended talking therapy. Not sure will be comfortable discussing. Felt really wrecked after explaining my situation to the doc the 1st session itself.
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    • Posted

      Hi Avery

      If you have been a depressed for quite a while don't you think it might be a good idea discussing with someone why? If you see a counsellor they listen to you, they might just confirm what you say, but they are non-judgement - you talk they listen. You don't have to say anything you don't want. You don't "discuss". I can't tell you about therapy/psychotherapy as I haven't had it.

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    • Posted

      I understand that. Often the most difficult problems cause the most drain when discussing them. Thats because they are so emaotionally charged and string emotions take a lot of energy.

      Talking theropy is very different to talking to the GP and much better. counsellors are trained to be sensitive and understanding and will give you the support you need when working through difficult emotions. 

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    • Posted

      And certainly in the counselling I went on the counsellor hardly says anything, maybe just repeating something that you have said. She didn't try and force some theory or structure on what I said. I saw a MIND counsellor for 2 years and I paid a small amount (this varies according to one's ability to pay).
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    • Posted

      My gp referred me to a group counselling session. I went yesterday for the first time and there is 6 sessions. The course is geared to u healing yourself and breaking the depressional cycle. The trouble is when you are so low it's hard to think out of your box. I am not sure how I will get on in this group but will give it a go. I have noticed that a lot of people on this forum are working and I was wondering how hard it must be. I am starting a new job in January only two days a week so want to be better to have the strength to start it 
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    • Posted

      Teresa, I think with respect that what you are going to is group therapy - not counselling. I have not been to any group where you don't end up by challenging other people - it can be very painful.

      I hope you don't mind me saying but if you are doing this through your GP you are not seriously ill (I speak as someone who was in hospital for 8 months 6 years ago).

      One would hope that you will be on the road to recovery by the time you start your job.

      If one is seriously ill and very depressed (as I was) it is very difficult to benefit from any talking therapies and the purpose of meds is to reduce the depression etc until the user is capable of discussing their situation. Some self-awareness is required for counselling, therapy or group work.

      When I was quite ill I wouldn't have been able to participate coherently in a group like this.

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    • Posted

      By the way you might be right about people working but I don't see people in this thread talking about working.

      Peronally I haven't worked since I had my last breakdown. I will be 61 shortly and I was advised not to work because of the stress - though the boredom and feeling of loneliness is intense - although I do volunteer.

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    • Posted

      That sounds interesting. I tried an anxiety management course once through mind & have done things at my local womens aid. 
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    • Posted

      Hi Nick, I work, part time, but I've incfeased my hours to cover the cost of having time off over the xmas period but stil not full time hours, I don't forsee myself working fulltime for quite a few years. On my own with 2 sons under 11 so that doesn't help. 

      Voluntary work is great for the soul. That's good of you.

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    • Posted

      I work full time in IT. I find working is a douple sided coin. On the one hand the added pressure of having to get up and dealing with resposibilties can be difficult. On the other side of the coin, getting out and talking to people outside of my normal circle about things other than my problems helps and can be escape.

      What does make a hugh difference is if you have an understanding manager who is aware of your health and supports you. 

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    • Posted

      dinky_dee and Tony I "suffered" early retirement due to ill-health 20 years ago when I was 40. I was offered no counselling or support. I had returned to work part-time and after a year I didn't show that i was performing at the required level as a statistician - obviously very detailed work and I was responsible for my own work rather than responding to things which arose. I had no problem with that as I was massively unhappy there.

      But overnight I lost my main social network - I didn't have an outside social life. Even though my colleagues who had one time been my friends had (not the same people) had become my enemies (not just imaginary or socially but the ways they acted towards me regarding my work).

      The very next day I went to a secretarial agency, given a typing test and was given secretarial/typing work. I was driving a car at the time and so I could go anywhere. If I wanted to do that these days everybody does their own typing.

      At that time PCs were new but I had quite an experience in working on PCs/Apple Macs. Very quickly it became apparentthat my skills were superior to this and I went on to doing PC Support. At no time did I have to give references - Iater I had to drag it out of my former employer and I ended up having to write directly to the Director of HR who provided me with a testimonial - my publications were a matter of public record and I was merely asking for confirmation that I hadn't worked there. I was not very good at PC Support and so I went on a series of short jobs.

      Employment searching was my major occupation - on the putative Internet in It jobs - they were the first to use it for this purpose. The fact that I was able to use it showed that I had a certain knowledge though as I recall none of my employers were using it.

      I ended up about 5 years later having another breakdown.

      Seriously depressed I went to a Clubhouse where we had to work there and they offered work placements. I was given a 9 month placement in a HA (preceding a PCT).

      This enabled to get work through an agency at a MHT on the basis that I had worked in the NHS and had knowledge of MH.

      This led to me more senior jobs in the NHS and periods of employment interspersed with unemployment - I had a small pension from my former employer.

      I had my most recent breakdown at age 52 and I was in hospital for 8 months.. About 3 years ago I was advised not to work - on varying grounds - the stress of the workplace (you can't walk away from all disputes there) or that even if I was to do permitted work the work for me as a professional would be clerical and therefore boring).

       Before that I was pushed in to a 2-day a week job at a charity which I eventually walked out of after the unhappiness with my work - I was effectively an unpaid intern - I had gone in to it straight after 8 months in hospital). The organisation that I was attending was for moving people to employment rather than volunteering.

      I also attended a FE college for a course for people with MH issues - full-time for 3 years (in the 3rd year doing a Diploma in Volunteering).

      Since then I have done various voluntary work - on the whole there is no proper management of voluntary staff - consideration of whether the person has a clear idea of what they are supposed to be doing and overlap with others - all things that an employee would expect or be able to discuss with a manager so I left these or moved).

      I now visit a home for old people with severe dementia.

      Yesterday I was told that the 94-year-old man who I visit through AgeUK no longer wished me to visit him because I was unwell. My manager didn't qualify this to reassure me on this - last week I had rung up to say that I wouldn't be going in as I was very tired - I hadn't slept the last 2 nights. Apparently she had said I was "unwell".

      Sitting at home even using patient.info I have gone stircrazy. I play in an orchestra (now on vacation) and sing in a choir.

      I have stopped going to MH daycentres because of the way that they have treated me but I also feel that they drag me down.

      I emailed my pdoc and he said had I tried U3A. I had briefly and I am still considering it. In my area it is badly managed but I am 60 - not 80.

      Might I add that I don't think that I would have been advised not to work if I had been 40 - not 55.

      I manage financially only because I inherited from my father and so I have been able to pay off my mortgage.

      I am sorry for the lengthy post. Our situations are all different and therefore I thought I would show you from where I come.

      I am still looking for more volunteering roles. In principle in volunteering I can opt not to go in if I don't "feel" like it. I would not do that too much because obviously the charity will not be interested in me if that is the case.

      I will not do things that I think they could be paying me for - even on a forum. I often find myself doing things in an Internet forum where I realise that I am giving professional advice and therefore after an hour I should be paid for!

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