6 months without Mirtazapine stomach issues?

Posted , 6 users are following.

This discussion has been locked due to a period of inactivity. Start a new discussion

Hi

I was on 15-30mg mirtazapine for about a year for depression. I quit the drug almost 6 months ago more or less cold-turkey. 15-0 mg in 2 weeks.

However, ever since I've had problems with my stomach, it's constantly rumbling, and I mean constantly. Making weird noises and creating gas.

I did check if I had lactose/gluten intolerence, but I didn't.

However I do have extreme anxiety from time to time and also overall generalized anxiety, I can feel my chest/stomach muscles are really tight. Could this be the cause? Usually I get a sense when i worry more, the stomach gets worse.

Please help me out, I'm even starting to think mirtazapine created a permanent damage on my stomach, which honestly seems very far fetched.

Thanks

/Patient.

0 likes, 5 replies

Report

5 Replies

  • Posted

    One think I have found generally with drugs that "treat" the nervous system is that the whole body seems to be affected, which is reasonable seeing as nerves go everywhere.   Again, generalising, although the half life of mirtazapine is 30 hours, that is blood plasma levels.   How long it stays in nerve cells is a different matter, and it's usually a lot (with some drugs a LOT) longer before it's "flushed out" of the entire body.   As you say, stomach problems are common in anxiety.   Add to this the known abdominal cramps side-effect of withdrawal and I would suggest you have your answer there.   Your body, in my opinion, is going to take quite some time to fully settle down back to how it was before you never took this horrible drug.   Speak with your GP (who no doubt knows nothing anyway from my experience) if you are concerned but unless it is causing you considerable distress, then I'd say - "cut yourself some slack" smile   Be kind to yourself, relax and realise time takes time (some CNS drugs can take 2-3 years to get out of your system!).   Drink plenty of water, take vit B complex daily, (the water flushes out the vit B helps "heal" the nervous system).

    Ian

     

    Report
  • Posted

    It sounds to me as though your stomach problems are caused by anxiety, especially since the effects include tightened chest muscles. I agree with Ian, you should try to relax more, and try not to worry about the drug. I've never heard of mirtazapine causing permanent damage to your digestive system, but I'm no expert. Worrying about what it just might have done is likely to be raising your anxiety levels, so counterproductive. I've been on mirtazapine for over 6 years, with no noticeable side effects except a dry mouth.
    Report
  • Posted

    Hi 

    I read your post "ever since I quit virtually cold turkey 15 mg in 2 weeks" I have suffered stomach problems.  I have read this many times, Mirt does help with IBS and I think at the same time once off the drug, this can also occur.  In my humble opinion I would say Mirt is the cause and ony time will heal it.  I think Mirt' leaves us vulnerable to "our weaknesses" once off the drug, and therefore necessitates treating any symptoms that arise with suitable natural remedies or therapy.  One remedy jumps to mind and you'll find it at the herbalist and thats Charcoal capsules, maybe have a google, see if it fits for you?

    You are not alone, many speak of those symptoms, either at a low dose of Mirt' or once off it; I think quitting quickly doesn't help but sometimes we have to do what we have to do don't we !  

    Best wishes

    Report
  • Posted

    I will add that it isn't about the drug being in or out of your system per se, but the fact that this drug and all psych meds alter neurochemistry such that the nervous system pushes back by making modifications in an effort to bring back homeostasis.  In essence, the nervous system builds the drug's actions into normal operation.  So, when the drug is removed, the changes remain and now you have imbalances again. Things don't just snap back to pre-drug operation; it takes time for the nervous system to adapt back, because it isn't just about raising and lowering serotoinin, but the fact that changing serotonin levels interplays with levels of other neurotransmitters, hormones, etc.  It simply takes time for all the reverberations of a cold turkey cessation to settle out.  This is not permanent nerve damage, but it will take time to heal.  And yes, 80% of your serotonin exists outside the brain, with a lot of it in the gut.
    Report
  • Posted

    Yes mate its the Mirt. Im around a year off now and my stomach is just starting the heal. Had the bloating, cramps, gas etc, even developed acid reflux and regurgitation of food but all getting better, still a few months to go I reckon.
    Report

Join this discussion or start a new one?

New discussion

Report as inappropriate

Thanks for your help!

We want the forums to be a useful resource for our users but it is important to remember that the forums are not moderated or reviewed by doctors and so you should not rely on opinions or advice given by other users in respect of any healthcare matters. Always speak to your doctor before acting and in cases of emergency seek appropriate medical assistance immediately. Use of the forums is subject to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy and steps will be taken to remove posts identified as being in breach of those terms.

newnav-down newnav-up