Ablation help pleaee

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Any advice will help, I had my ablation done November, 3rd of this year. Today I was crying and hyperventilating and when I stopped my chest was tight and I felt light headed I don't want to intensionally prolong my recovery. Doctors say I might experience chest tightness & shortness of breath its common. I also was told I gave IST and I been stressed and it's frustrating. Can anyone tell me there experience after their ablation please

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  • Posted

    Hi. Ive had 2 ablations, one Dec 2015, the second May 2016. After my first, my chest was quite sore, but inside if that makes sense. My right side ribcage was also sore, i assume after the pushing n poking, and possibly some minor bruising. First recovery was 3 weeks and i was 52 yrs old. Second time was 2 weeks. You MUST go easy this first 7 days, then slowly build up. Dont forget, although youre in and out in a day (day/night), your heart has had some major messing! If youre worried, use your post op helpline for advice, but rest to allow your body time to repair. You might still get AF during these recovery months too. Go steady, no heavy stuff and get well soon. 😊

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    • Posted

      Thank you for your comment, I'm just nervous because I cry a lot and I don't want it to intervene with my recovery or god for bid make it worse because I tend to hyperventilate also. Right now I have acid reflux too

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    • Posted

      Summed it up week Cardiac Congo. Had my ablation in April2016. Since then have only had a short episode of AF (two weeks post op) and since then nothing. Been told no more than three standard drinks per week(that is the hardest thing from my perspective). Am of blood thinner now, only take 4mg of perindopril a day. Lif is almost back to normal for the first time in almost two years! It really is a journey, good luck with yours.
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    • Posted

      Sorry, that should be 'summed it up well'. ( I really dislike the auto-correct feature that iPads have sometimes!!)😋

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    • Posted

      Im jealous!! As i write, having a bit of a dooo!! Just waiting for date for 3rd procedure! Apparently i repair too well!! Still on xeralto, but quit the verapamil back in spring. Did nothing, made me feel horrid all of the time where episodes make me feel yeuch some of the time!! Its all very hit n miss it seems, and recoveries vary.
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    • Posted

      Hi Niya, when you say 'handled it' are you talking about my ablation, or the whole Afib journey over the last two years?

      To write in detail about all that I've done with risk factors (weight loss, severe sleep apnoea, loads of Internet research, exercise), and other lifestyle changes, would be be a very long response indeed.

      But knowledge is power, and you can have a significant impact on coping/dealing with your AF if you are prepared to adopt a 'whatever it takes' type attitude toward it.

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    • Posted

      I should probably qualify my above response.

      Many people are able to have a significant influence on their Afib status if they are prepared to do whatever it takes.

      Afib is a very variable condition with many contributing factors and causes. There is no 'one size fits all approach to it, so we all need to 'feel our way' through this minefield that is AF.

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    • Posted

      I appreciate your response, and after your ablation experience. I lost 30 pounds because I was depressed and trouble sleeping, I fear being alone , I also did research but it made me feel worse. I have yet to find what works for me sadly. I just want my old life back. I had my ablation but my inner self is not all that happy I wish I was 100% happy
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    • Posted

      Do you have any idea what may have triggered your AF?

      For me, I believe it was a genetic predisposition, in combination with an over indulgent lifestyle.

      The final precipitating event was a big night on the booze,. I jumped out of rhythm and stayed out. Stupidly, I didn't notice as I was used to having puplitations that always went away, so I learned to ignore these warning signs.

      After what must have been three weeks of AF, I was carted off to hospital by ambulance. Diagnosis was a tachycardia induced cardiomyopathy. Left ventricle was severely enlarged(25% ejection fraction, is now back up to 60%)

      I have a BP machine with an AF function on it (it tells me if I'm in AF) as I don't always notice.

      I also wear Fitbit 24/7 and keep a close eye on my heart rate.

      Ive learnt that more than two or glasses of wine considerably increases my heart rate, so have to be very careful with alcohol consumption.

       

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    • Posted

      I honestly have no idea. 3 months ago doctors kept telling me its anxiety. They have me a holter monitor and 2months later caught the SVT and gave me verapamil 120ml which slowed my heart rate but didnt help made me feel worse. I had my ablation november, 3rd doctor said he couldn't find the SVT but fixed the extra pathway and told me I had IST, the ablation should fix the problem he told me. I can't stop my stress I try and try

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    • Posted

      Perhaps looking at ways to control/reduce stress is the direction your AF journey needs to go? (For now at least). Obviously don't want even try to suggest how to do that as that is very personal thing.

      If you are able to tick stress off your list of possible causes and still have issues, you can then start to look at other possible causes.

       

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    • Posted

      I've been stressed sooooo long,I'll try harder to control how often I get stressed or if I can prevent it. Sorry for being down and depressing sounding but it's been so hard I've been on this bumpy road. It all happened so fast

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  • Posted

    Niya, I have to agree with Simon this time. Keep looking ahead and try to find the positives. Getting your head around whats going on with your body does take a bit of an adjustment to your wider approach, and i found after my first treatment, i was wary of "doing" stuff. It passed after a short time, when i realised i would be ok. Its a pretty big deal. This forum has been invaluable - for advice, support, and to maintain a sense of humour when we feel rubbish. Keep posting, keep asking. We are ALL in this boat together and can give moral support.

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    • Posted

      Thank you I greatly appreciate it. That's my problem I'm so focus on getting back to my old self I feel as though I'm pushing to hard but I'm tired of feeling helpless and depending on people it's just frustrating.

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    • Posted

      Dont be an old self, be a new niya, a post ablation, afib coping niya. One who squares up to the changes your body is enforcing upon you, and knows that you may need to alter/avoid/adjust in the journey forward. On my journey, Ive become a teetotaller, cant eat toblerone, but other choccie in moderation is ok! Cant drink cola, but j2o is fine. Cant get too cold, cant get too tired, cant become dehydrated. Chill this first week, then slowly start to recognise your personal triggers, and youll slowly get a grip on your condition. Its a bumpy road, with some awkward twists, but youre not alone.
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    • Posted

      .......and having said all of that, im sitting here with my heart dancing a quick step, a no flippin' clue whats started it tonight!! Niya, you WILL get through. And, in time, you too can find it in yourself to shake your head n grin as you try to work out what sneaked up on you to flip you out of rhythm! On we go then.........😜

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    • Posted

      Thank you Cardiac Congo , I will be a new strong me it won't be easy but I'll try. Your advice is really kind and helpful. I appreciate it. I'm glad you know what triggers yours and you can deal with them

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    • Posted

      For what it's worth Niya, AF is not a death sentence; I see it as more of an obstacle to be overcome. My 84 yo mother has lived in permanent AF for the last 15 years. Admittedly it has slowed her down a bit but it hasn't too debilitating for her. Looks like I inherited her dodgy heart gene!😜

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    • Posted

      Wow God bless your grandma she's a strong women 👏👏..... I'll start looking at it that way "an obstacle to overcome" so I can have some kind peace. Has she ever had an ablation for it? Or have you

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    • Posted

      They never cardioverted mum because of a leaky mitral valve. I've been cardioverted 5 times prior to having my ablation back in April. Things have been really good for me since then, nearly off all my meds, just taking half a perindopril tablet a day.

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    • Posted

      That's great that things are good for you ,hopefully no more medication for you soon. How did you feel a couple of days after the ablation you had in April?

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    • Posted

      Very similar to Cardiac Congo's description. I took 3weeks of work, but probably could have pushed myself to go back after 2 weeks. Having the extra week was nice though, had time for gentle walks at first, and have now built up to regular 5km walk/run 3-5 times a weeks (I find these walks help me to think through things that are bugging me).

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    • Posted

      That sounds peaceful. That's good your consistent with your walking and running it releases endorphins which is great for stress . My doctor , cardiologist, and arrhythmia doctor recommend walks but I get out of breath quick , I don't walk far. I'm 135pounds Idk why maybe I haven't really been out the house since august except for appointments, I'll talk to my doctor tomorrow to see what she says.

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    • Posted

      Start small and build up as you feel appropriate. I find that wearing a Fitbit with a heart rate function helps me see what my heart is doing when I'm on my walk/jogs. This helps to know how far to push it. Remember, baby steps at first and then increase as you feel appropriate. 

      I also have a loop recorder implanted in chest as I'm part of an AF research study, this also monitors what my heart is doing and transmits data back to my cardiologist's computer via the mobile phone network.

       

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    • Posted

      I'll start off small good idea I often push too hard. That's amazing that your cardiologist can get the results immediately. Did you lose weight because of stress too? I was 164pounds then became stressed

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    • Posted

      Was told to get under90kg to have the best possible chance of beating AF.

      was told by my Electrophysiologist that there was an 87% chance of still being n rhythm at there 5yr post ablation  mark if I addressed all my risk factors. He also said that if I didn't address them, my chance of being in rhythm at the 5 yr mark was less than 20%!!😱

      So bit of a no brainer really.

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    • Posted

      That's great I hope you get under 198pounds that would be so awesome if you completely diminish it

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    • Posted

      Should also say that I did an awful lot of 'Doctor shopping' to find the best Electrophysiologist I could. I have several siblings that are either doctors or nurses, so was able to find out who's the best. The skill level of the person performing the ablation plays a pretty significant role in ablation success I think.

      Turns out we have a world renown Electrophysiologist living in sleepy old Adelaide, South Australia.

      I feel very fortunate.

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    • Posted

      You should feel that way 👏👏 you're closer to having no more symptoms which is great and having the best doctor is even more great

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    • Posted

      There is a short interview with my Electrophysiologist if you google search the following "legacy pi throws down the gauntlet to us physicians" admittedly its poor ably more interesting for me as he is my Electrophysiologist, but he says some important stuff that is most definitely food for thought.

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