AGE

Edited , 9 users are following.

  • It would be great if posters included their age, so we can compare our own AF on a similar basis.
  • How long you've have had AF.
  • Whether it's PAF or Chronic.
  • If PAF how many episodes and how long they go for.
  • What medications have been successful or otherwise.
  • Have you considered an ablation?
  • And if you have had one, at what age did you have it.

I'm in my late 70's and considering ablation as AF is become increasingly more difficult to deal with

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11 Replies

  • Edited

    I am turning 63. Was officially diagnosed with afib at 55. However, due to being in permanent (chronic) afib at the time of diagnosis my cardiologist said I had probably had it for several years before it was caught.

    I tend to agree as I had many episodes of my heart racing which I attributed to perimenopause. It was never caught on full cardiac work ups when I went in regarding these episodes...

    I am for the most part asymptomatic. I am on diltizem 180, digoxin, warfarin as well as lisinprol. My rate is pretty much under control. I get tired frequently and need a daily nap. Other than the fatigue which affects my quality of life I do okay.

    I was advised by my doctor that due to my afib being mostly asymptomatic, the meds keeping my rate under control, and being in chronic afib an ablation would not be worth the risk. She also pointed out the longer you are in afib the less chance of a successful outcome.

    I am okay with that as the idea of heart surgery terrifies me!

    Lastly I believe my afib is genetic and/or caused by sleep apnea.

    I look forward to other responses...

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  • Edited

    I am 71 and have had PAF for approx 10 years. At first not too much of a problem as could go weeks between attacks.

    I have had 3 ablations (roughly one a year)which sadly have not stopped the AF. Recently was having attacks every other day some of which could last 24 hours / Took Flecanide 100mg twice a day and a third one during an attack. Now on 50mg Flec and .2.5mg Bisoprolol, and can now go two weeks between attacks and they are less harsh but still can last hours.

    Options: Try more toxic meds, or blast the AV node and have pacemaker fitted. Not tempted with either so soldiering on as I am.

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  • Edited

    HI, I'm 58 had Afib/flutter for 5 years was admitted to A&E 3 times in one week, two weeks ago absolute nightmare!! I'm on Apixaban other meds seem to make things worse don't tolerate them well. I had an ablation in September 2019 and was told it was successful but a week later it started again... had a 14 hour episode, didn't go to hospital that time.

    I have tried various techniques to stop it myself, blowing hard into a syringe a paramedic gave me, baring down as if on the toilet, putting hands into freezing cold water, coughing etc. to no avail.

    After I came home from A&E for the third time, 2 weeks ago it started again I really didnt want to go back again it's getting ridiculous! so I started to try various techniques again and to my astonishment found something that stopped it, I was sitting on my Gym ball (i'm so not fit!) and started to do my breathing, slowly in then hold it a few seconds if you can then slowly out at the same time i leant forward so my head was between my knees I stayed like that for a few minutes and my heart just went back into normal rythm. I was terrified to move in case it started again eventually i moved and it stayed in normal rythm, later that day Afib started again so I repeated the above and it stopped again.....would love to know if this could work for others, worth a try I think.

    I'm currently waiting to see cardiologist about what next! I think for me the only option left is AV node ablation!!!

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    • Posted

      Remember once its done it cant be undone. It doesn't stop your heart from quivering. The faulty impulses are still generated. It will not restore sinus rhythm. Some people don't feel the palpitations but many others do.

      Have you considered another ablation. Choosing a very experienced EP in the golden rule. Asking how many ablation they've done and what their success rate is. You are still young with time to decide. Google AV Node ablation and read, not just the good ones, but the bad ones as well.

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  • Edited

    I'm 67 and had my first episode of PAF in 2012 when I was 59. Over the last 8 years, I've only had 10 episodes, of varying lengths from the first one that lasted an hour to the longest of 10 hours. I went to the hospital a few times but by the time I got there the symptoms had resolved and I think they were convinced I was having panic attacks. In 2017 I had an unrelated episode of myocarditis (inflammation of the heart caused by a virus, I was told). This led me to seeing a cardiologist who suggested I buy a Kardia (ECG recording device) so that I could send him a view of my palpitations. In the following March 2018 I sent him a recording and he immediately diagnosed PAF and put me on Apixaban. Last year I was given Flecainide 50 mg to use as a "pill in the pocket". The first time I used it, my PAF resolved in one hour. Two days ago I had another episode and the first pill didn't really do much so I took a second pill three hours later. This resolved the PAF but sent my blood pressure too low and I was very dizzy. Next time, if I need a second dose, I'll only take 1/2 a tablet. I hope this will be useful to someone.

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  • Edited

    Hi shirley, A friend of mine had an AV node ablation in September last year a last resort she was told, she was being admitted to hospital frequently with a fast heart rate. She was quite poorly for a while after caught pnemonia she recovered from that and she is now better than ever was out partying at new year...we are all different and I am still worried as my consultant told me they don't like to do this procedure in people my age if I had been in my 80s they wouldn't hesitate. A t the moment life isn't worth living so will see what he says when I see him in April.

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    • Edited

      Good luck! My af has altered over the years and now get a fast regular beat when having an attack. As it subsides get prebeats and misbeats and is very unsettled, but at mo since beta blocker I am coping but due to see specialist next month. Doctors are so keen that the choices are ours but sometimes would prefer their expert opinion!

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  • Edited

    Am 54

    had a tachycardia induced cardiomyopathy in Dec. 2014(ejection fraction 25%-considetedto be a severe cardiomyopathy).

    put on Blood thinners and d cardioverted a couple of weeks later.

    only stayed in for a day or so.

    put on amioderone and cardioverted again.

    Stayed in this time.

    one month later, left ventricle cardiomyopathy shrank back down(ejection fraction back up to 53%-happy days!)

    Taken off Amioderone after six months(very risky/dangerous meds, but very effective!) .

    A few months of after I had AF again, cardioveted back in immediately., but happened again twice in the to two months that followed.

    Decided ablation was the way to go.

    had ablation April 2016 and have been fine ever since.

    Have to live pretty cleanly though(which sucks a bit!)

    If I have more than one or two alcoholic drinks my ectopic beats increase.

    If I gain a few extra KGs, my ectopics increase.

    Staying fairly fit , and living a relatively healthy life seem to the key? (well they do for me at least).

    I think the important factor with ablations is to do you homework and make sure you get one of the hives eat in the business to do it. They tend to last longer if they're done well. (my opinion)

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  • Edited

    Am 54

    had a tachycardia induced cardiomyopathy in Dec. 2014(ejection fraction 25%-considetedto be a severe cardiomyopathy).

    put on Blood thinners and d cardioverted a couple of weeks later.

    only stayed in for a day or so.

    put on amioderone and cardioverted again.

    Stayed in this time.

    one month later, left ventricle cardiomyopathy shrank back down(ejection fraction back up to 53%-happy days!)

    Taken off Amioderone after six months(very risky/dangerous meds, but very effective!) .

    A few months of after I had AF again, cardioveted back in immediately., but happened again twice in the to two months that followed.

    Decided ablation was the way to go.

    had ablation April 2016 and have been fine ever since.

    Have to live pretty cleanly though(which sucks a bit!)

    If I have more than one or two alcoholic drinks my ectopic beats increase.

    If I gain a few extra KGs, my ectopics increase.

    Staying fairly fit , and living a relatively healthy life seem to the key? (well they do for me at least).

    I think the important factor with ablations is to do you homework and make sure you get one of the hives eat in the business to do it. They tend to last longer if they're done well. (my opinion)

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  • Edited

    in regard to the ablation. i am 72 and had it done in Boston. process lasted about 4 hours or so with a night in the hospital. Was free from afib for about a month. did'nt hold. Had an additional cardio version and have been free since. about 4 months.

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