Anaesthetic, does it work for Colonoscopy?

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Hi, I'm having a first colonoscopy soon, and am concerned at the pain aspect, Doctors tell me it is virtually pain free, and I have a history of poor reactions to anaesthetics with previous hospital procedures and Dentists, where they just dont work, anybody else have this problem and how do you overcome it.

I have always told the Doctors who tend to just ignore what I say, I have to assume that any pain relief I get will not work until much later in the day, is this manageable?

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7 Replies

  • Posted

    I find that Doctors dont believe that it happens, although I know it does, I tried to explain this once but I was told that they hear stories of people feeling things during surgery but no one can say for certain if it was real, I had one colonoscopy last year and felt fearful but in the end it was not a serious pain, when I understood what the pain was, apparently air extending the bowel, I felt ok about it and able to cope, when I thought it was pressure from the instruments I was more fearful. Impossible I know but being relaxed is the way to approach this - good luck
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  • Posted

    You won't be having an anaesthetic only sedation and pain relief.
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  • Posted

    what is the difference? I thought anaesthetic was pain relief
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  • Posted

    Anaesthetic, General knocks you out, Regional is injected near a nerve bundle for large areas as in an epidural, Local affects a specific small area as used in the dental surgery.

    Sedation/Pain relief is usually an Opoid which affects the receptors in the brain, the pain is still there but the drugs effect allows you to tolerate the pain and in most cases you won't remember it afterwards.

    Pethadine and Midazolam are common ones.

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  • Posted

    Thank you, I didn't know that, can I ask about the sedatives, how do they work, are they for the comfort of the patient, or are they to allow the Doctor to just get on with it without interruption.
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  • Posted

    They act on the receptors in the brain which alter your perception of any pain,

    so the pain is still there but your brain is hopefully telling you it isn't.

    Of course it's for the comfort of the patient and obviously the medical team want to get the tests completed, waste of time if they have to stop because the patient is jumping around in pain.

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  • Posted

    Thank you, as a result I spoke to my Doctor and to the nurses at the endoscopy clinic, I have told them I am wary of this and have asked specifically where the possible pain comes from, to allow me to make a decision.

    I have been informed that it would be mainly due to \"looping of the scope\" putting pressure on the colon walls, or where the scope end has impacted, both mainly during insertion.

    Understanding this gives me more confidence, thank you for your help.

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