Anterior repair buttock pain

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Hi Ladies I am new to the site and have read a lot of posts and the useful info but a unable to find the answer to a question that I have.  I am 14 days post Anterior repair unfortunately due to a seized bowel I spent six days in hospital for what was meant to be day surgery mad  My question is I am experiencing buttock pain am not sure is this normal.  Am taking paracetamol terrified to take codeine took me till a few days ago to have a proper bowel movement.  My other question is urinary incontinence didn't suffer it that badly post op but now have to wear a pad as even after voiding bladder I am leaking.  Any words of advise of reassurance would be most gratefully received 

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12 Replies

  • Posted

    Hello. Are you sure it was an anterior repair (cystocele) you had and not a posterior repair (rectocele) because your bowel was involved? With a posterior repair buttock pain is inevitable and I know from experience how painful it is. Have you been given stool softeners? They will help constipation and then you can take codeine along with Lactulose for instance to help your pain. Pain hinders recovery so you need to take something that helps. Codeine and paracetamol together is very effective.
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    • Posted

      Yes it was definetly an anterior repair the reason I asked about the buttock pain is because I cannot understand the reason for it and was worried it was abnormal.  I wasn't given stool softener took Fybogel and eventually doctor prescribed me glycerin suppositories which thankfully did the trick.  Bowel is now functioning normally.
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    • Posted

      Another reason for buttock pain is due to the position you are placed in for the operation. Your legs are placed in lithotomy poles (stirrups) and that can pull on the muscles and tendons in your lower back and legs.
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    • Posted

      Thank you was just a bit worried that this pain wasn't normal.  Think I will give the paracetamol and codeine a try just make sure I am eating plenty of roughage so constipation doesn't return.  
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  • Posted

    I am nearly 4 months post op and started having urinary incontinence 3 weeks post op when I first started short walks.  I still have it a little but it has much improved in the last few weeks.  Some drinks irritate the bladder - I have decaff tea and coffee and avoid citrus fruit juices, green tea is also bad.  I've also been advised not to drink too much and keep up the pelvic floor exercises.  Taking Ovestan regularly has also helped.  I think the buttock pain is something we all have after rectocele repair and it does improve.
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    • Posted

      Thank you for your reply. Hospital stay was traumatising between dehydration and bowel blockage was on drip to rehydrate so am now a bit paranoid at keeping myself hydrated.  Will give your suggestions a try also had to self catheter so it's from one extreme to another maybe am just a bit impatient for recovery 
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    • Posted

      Women should drink a minimum 1.5 litres of liquid per day, maximum 2 litres.  We shouldn't cut down below that but I drink lots of tea and was drinking much more than that - I've now been told that in your 60s (as I am) our bladder just does not cope with too much, especially post surgery.  The fashion for always having a bottle of water and drinking a lot of it is apparently not as good for us as we think.
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  • Posted

    I had stress incontinence before my anterior repair and about a week post-op after other op discharge had stopped, I noticed I was constantly leaking tiny bit of urine so had to wear liners. Then along the way they were getting too wet. I was super stressed about it as thought the op had given me permanent dribble. But at week 4 I rang Urogynae Nurse who faxed a lab urine form to get MSU. It came back that I had ecoli bacteria in urine. I had none of the other usual UTI symptoms.
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    • Posted

      That's really useful I am still waiting to see the Continence nurse have mentioned it over the phone. Can I Ask did you suffer with the pain in your buttocks it's getting me down can't stay on my feet too long feel as though it is holding my recovery back 
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    • Posted

      I only had anterior prolapse repaired & last minute Urogynae decided to not also do my posterior repair at same time. Grrrr. So I didn't get buttock pain. Nature is kind & I can't now really remember what pain I had. I think the worst pain was deep in groin on my left side kind of in from where top of leg joins body. I thought from wnd of week one to five that I had gone from stress incontinence to general constant incontinence! But it was the ecoli infection making my waterworks try hard to flush out the infection. It came totally right after antibiotics. Now I can gleefully full force sneeze without stopping what I'm doing or bracing with legs crossed! SO embarrassing out in public!! And can laugh my head off, run a bit (never really ran much before due to MTP joint fusions in feet), & go for 1.5hr brisk walk with no leakage! YAY!

      Today I saw our cities best Gastroenterologist (for Lowe oesophagael problems - ? gastric reflux disease) & he said to see the Colorectal Specialist Surgeon at the practice to discuss rectocoele repair! He reckoned they are better than a Urogynae at doing rectocoeles!! Arrrrhhhhh! Conflicting advice! Everybody on here says to, & uses Urogynae!! But "uro" means stuff to do with bladder, & of course the Gynae part is cause these repairs are done through vag wall. I might get beaten up on here from this!! Eeeek.

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    • Posted

      Urogynaecologists have more success with all pelvic floor surgery according to research that was recently carried out. It's because of the intensive training a gynaecologist has to undertake so on top of all the training to be eligible to be a consultant gynaecologist they have an extra 3 years training to use the title Urogynaecologist. Colorectal surgeons don't do that amount of training and tend to perform bowel surgery. In some NHS Trusts if you were referred to a colorectal surgeon for a repair it wouldn't be accepted and your GP would have to refer to a Urogynaecologist. They tend not to "tread on their toes". Unless of course you're in the USA where urologists perform prolapse surgery. I wouldn't let a colorectal surgeon repair my prolapse, I know who the experts are.
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