Anti Thyroid Peroxidase...so confused

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Hello, So I am new to this forum...I am new to Hypo and also have questions...

My TSH was 11.49...

Doc put me on 112mcg of Levo, started yesterday

On Monday took closer look at thyroid through bloodwork. Doc's office just called with results.

Free T4 is .9 (normal). Free t3 is 2.8 (normal)

Anti thyroid Peroxidase was greater than 900, indicating something. But the MA over the phone could not tell me what. I asked her what all this means, and how my thyroid is underactive if my t3 and t4 are ok. She said she did not know. I would need to talk to Doc. but continue on medication...

I am so new to this. Can someone help and explain this to me? Is levo the best thing to be on for hight Anthi Thyroid Peroxidase? Im so scared sad

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19 Replies

  • Posted

    Hello Rhwittman:

    My name is Shelly and I am an RN -nurse in the USA.  I have Hashimoto's thyroid disease since 1987.

    Let's go over your blood work:  TSH is thyroid stimulating hormone and it is a built in sensor hormone and gets signals from the Pituitary gland.  Normal is 0.45 to 4.50 and the higher end of the scale means you are low!  It is opposite and confusing.

    SO if you are 11.49 you have Hypothyroidism, and it can be replaced by LEVOTHYROXINE.

    The T4 is Thyroxine and should be 4.5 to 11.2 and you are good there!

    The FT3 should be 2.5 to 3.90 and you are good there!   

    Antibodies test, means some of us, myslef and others have an autoimmune (means these antibodies do not recognise your gland as you and want to attack it),thyroid condition like Hashimoto's and this means that you have these antibodies and they can attack the gland.  By being on medication early, you can keep it in check.

    It is not a bad thing, it can happen from having a family trait, or a virus called Epstein-Barr.

    I have it and I am 54 and still living a good life and so can you.  In time by taking your Levo, the antibodies will settle down.

    So any questions just ask, we are here for you, and many of us have it. Your  body is in good shape in T4 and T3 levels and so cheer up, this is correctable and liveable.

    XO Shelly 

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    • Posted

      Thank you, Shelly, for being so warm and welcoming and informative! Is this something that I need to look into further? Should I see an endocrinologist? Doesn't matter what it is that is causing these antibodies to be high? Is the treatment the same for all different types of thyroid problems?

      One of my fears is gaining a lot of weight on this medication. I know that technically, people say you should lose weight when being treated for hypothyroidism. But I have read on these forms of people have gained 10 pounds a week in some circumstances. Shelly, what was your experience on this medication? Any side effects? Also, can you explain why my thyroid is considered slow, when my thyroid hormones or normal? It is very confusing and scary. Thank you in advance for all of your help!

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    • Posted

      Hi rhwittman, you thyroid levels may be fine but your TSH levels are high.  This means your thyroid gland is struggling therefore your pituaitry gland is producing raised thyroid stimulating hormone to stimulate your struggling thyroid gland.  Once your medication kicks in your TSH should come down.

      Got to say that seems a really high dose to start off with.  My TSH has been around 50 and I'm only on 75 mcg Levo now, with good levels.  Not sure if you're in the UK but normally they start off with 25 or 50 mcg with a blood test 4-6 weeks later to see how it's going.

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    • Posted

      Hello Rhwittman:

      Well, back when I was diagnosed in 1987, I was put on Levo and I took it but my TSH never would come down.  When I was 12, I noticed I was constipated a lot, I hated cold weather and felt cold inside my body.  When I was in my 20's and in college for Nursing, my professor said you have a Goiter.  I was not heavy and was normal sized.  I was diagnosed  a bit later and I could not understand why my TSH was not coming down into normal range.

      You feel like some kind of criminal as I explained to my doctor, I was taking my Levo.  So he switched me to Thyrolar a combo of T3 & T4 and still no big change.

      I went onto Armour Thyroid aslo called NDT, and things got better.  However not great and my TSH was still on the higher end.  So it was finally figured out, I can't convert T4 into T3.

      Now you are not as bad as I because your blood work is good except for the TSH.  The antibodies if not treated will damage the gland so if you are on replacement hormone you give the thyroid extra help and that is good and keeps your body from getting a goiter and from more damage.

      I did gain some weight but  I am now on T3 Liothyronine only and I lost over 32 pounds and you should watch carbs.  I do walking 1/2 hour a day -you can do a little at first and then progress up to 1/2 hr.  I also swim.

      As to your question about a slow thyroid,  it may be damaged by the Antibodies and it made it not work as well.  Your thyroid is making horomones but your sensor  TSH is not normal and it is an early sign like a call for help!

      I think you are at an early stage of the autoimmune disease and some people swing between Hyper too  much and then go later  into  a more Hypo state. It is a slow process and it is good news your T3 and T4 are okay.

      Side effects can happen,  I experienced loose bowels.  Not now but early on.  I feel more alive now, on just T3.  I used to sleep a lot in the early days in my 20's.  Too bad we can't get that time back.

      Yes, see an Endo as it may be helpful as that is all about the  thyroid and they can tell you more.  Both your GP and Endo need to see you.

      I hope this helps, ask any questions you have.

      Shelly

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    • Posted

      Hi there,  You are not the first to tell me this, actually. I work in healthcare and several nurses I work with told me the same thing...we looked it up online and what I read is that healthy adults under 50 can start on optimal does...I will definitely look out for symptoms of being too high.
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    • Posted

      Thank you Shelly. I have so many qeuestions. I have noticed that my appetite is not so great the last two days. Is that a side effect of the medication?

       

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    • Posted

      Hello Rhwittman:

      Your thyroid regulates your Metbolism along with other things like your body temp, your periods, your mood in some ways, and your energy levels.

      Some people feel more hungry and others less hungry.  I never felt overly hungry. Try drinking a lot of water, it helps fill you up and you can use flavors squeezes in it.  If you feel hungry a lot, it might mean you have too much hormone.  I eat 3 balanced meals. If you feel hungry at lunch more than move a bigger meal to then and a lighter meal for dinner.

      Feel free to ask any questions.

      Shelly

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    • Posted

      I'm actually in my 30's 55 is my door number lol.  But I'm sure you'll be okay as if your dose is too high you'll soon know about it.  Hope all goes well for you.
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    • Posted

      Shelly the antibodies cannot be treated.  My antibodies are over 3000, all you can do is try and protect your thyroid by keeping your levels as good as possible.  A lot of people believe a gluten free diet helps with the antibodies, something I'm about to embark on.
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    • Posted

      Hi Pippa:

      What I meant to say is, The condition Hypothyroidism can be treated and by doing that you will keep it from getting worse.  The antibodies are there for life. 

      I am doing this from my head and meant to say it this way. Yes, GF can help reduce inflammation in the body which could aggravate autoimmune.

      Thanks, for pointing it out.

      Regards, Shelly

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  • Posted

    One more qeuestion... So, why would levo work if my T3 an T4 are normal? From what I have been reading, Levo converts T3 into T4, My overall TSH is high, which means my thyroid isn't functioning properly, or is under attack....but why is it high if my thyroid hormones are normal, and what exactly will the levo do?  I know this sounds like a nutty question, but I just am not fully grasping all of this. 

    i was diagnosed by my primary and I need to see an endocrinologist to explain all this...but in the meantime, I thought you guys might have some answers....Thank you so much in advance.

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    • Posted

      I'll do my best to answer this one... your TSH being high and your T4 and T3 being normal means your body is working too hard to keep your levels correct - think of trying to cycle up hill in too high a gear. By the way, it's T4 that your body converts to T3. The levothyroxine will mean that you
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    • Posted

      The levothyroxine will mean that your thyroid won't have to work so hard to get the level of T4 your body needs - as some of it is being provided by the levothyroxine tablets.
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    • Posted

      OK. I understand that now.  Thank you.  So my thyroid is working, but having to work much harder than someone with a normal thyroid to keep the levels correct. So the levothyroxine will prevent my thyroid from working so hard, and will relieve my symptoms of hypothyroidism
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    • Posted

      Spot on! Though it may take a bit of trial and error to find out what level of levothyroxine (i.e. T4) you need. It takes 6-12 weeks for the T4 & T3 levels in your blood to be correctly reflected in the blood tests.
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    • Posted

      If you're new to this, you also need to know:

      Take the levothyroxine on an empty stomach an hour before breakfast

      Leave at least 2 hours (some say 4 hours) before iron or calcium medication as these affect the absorption of thyroxine. Don't take iron at the same time as calcium as one affects the absorption of the other.

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    • Posted

      Thank you so much Barbara, I have been reading a ton and I did know that. Shoudl I be on a calcium supplement with levo? I usually take it at 6am ish and I don't eat until 8:30 ish.  Is it ok to take a multivitamin at that time?
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    • Posted

      Hi Rhwittman:

      Levo is T4 which is converted into T3 in your thyroid gland.  It is confusing, I know.

      Levo helps to give your thyroid that extra hormone it is struggling to make. It keeps your thyroid in good shape.  It replaces what amt. you are low in.  Like a car you need to add oil, and gas, it helps your thyroid make up the lost amount.

      Many people get thyroid problems and it hits women more than men.  You can live a good life as long as you help your thyroid out..  There are a lot of different meds for this and that is good.  You will need blood work to check your T3 and T4  and TSH levels.

      So take it on an empty stomach and space vitamins about 4 hours later.

      Any questions just ask.

      Regards,

      Shelly

       

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    • Posted

      I'm sure others will be able to give you a more definitive answer however, I personally would wait until lunch to take the multivitamin and yes i would take a calcium tablet but at a separate time to the multivitamin e.g. tea time..
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