Anyone get an Implanted Loop Monitor?

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I am scheduled to get a loop monitor next week. It is implanted under the skin about the size of a pack of gum? I had a 24 hour heart monitor and it showed nothing because I didn't have an episode. EKG's at the ER showed normal rhythm SVT's twice but all other tests are non-remarkable, not having episodes during them. I have been offered the ablation and maybe that is the best choices, not sure. Not super confident in my cardiologist IDK why. Because sometimes I think I feel a flutter or a beginning of an episode for a second, and then it is gone. I think maybe this monitor which can be left in for up to 3 years ( surely don't want it that long) is a good idea before agreeing to ablation. Anyone have an opinion for me? Thanks

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  • Posted

    I have a problem with why would he do this first. Why wouldn't he choose the ablation first. Why mask a problem instead of fixing the problem makes no sense. He needs to do a Electrophysiologic study of for short EPS that is where they put you under local anesthesia and temporary electrode catheters are threaded through peripheral veins or arteries into the heart using a fluoroscoperead up on it. you will agree once you read about it. its better than having something implanted if you really don't need it. I did mine and they found I had been born with extra nodes in my heart creating the SVT episodes. I had it all my life and was miss diagnosed for 27 years until finally it got tuck at 257 beats per minute and they had to stop my heart at the hospital this happened to me twice with in a couple of months where it got stuck that high and they had to stop the heart to get it to reset. The ablation worked. Make sure the Doctor your seeing specializes in electrocardiology. They deal with the actual electrical functions of the heart. the actual regular cardiologist sent me to him.

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  • Posted

     I've had a loop monitor for a year or so, Corinne, and it's basically a non issue in my life.  I'm only rarely fully aware of its existence, even as I add or remove the little accessory recorder to or from a pocket multiple times a day.  Implantation was only mildly uncomfortable, and if I were told I needed it for more than three years, I wouldn't be at all bothered.  I just now realized that if I were told it could be left in with a dead battery forever at no risk to me, I'd say, "Fine, if we can save Medicare and Tricare some money by doing so."  I also hope you soon gain more confidence in your cardiologist, and I wish the best for you.
    	      
    	 
    
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  • Posted

    I had one implanted about a year ago. However it's much smaller then what you're describing. Trying to capture an episode is hit or miss, but having an implanted monitor makes it much more likely. In order for your physician to make any determination on whats going on, you need to have episodes recorded. The info your doctor has, the better. My monitor will record when it 'detects' something abnormal. Then it will upload to a base station (that sits on my nightstand). The data only gets uploaded to my doctor's office when the base station uploads from the implant. Mine also has a device that can 'mark' an episode if I feel one happening. Ok, now how my monitor done any good? Well, it hasn't hurt. My condition has been the same for a few years now. I had an ablation about 10 years ago, but I came down with another condition. I suggest you get the implant so your doctor can come up with a solution. If you have any other questions feel free to msg me. Good luck .

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    • Posted

      thanks for your reply. that is exactly why I thought the device is a good idea, because besides the Emergency room episodes no other tests have showed what is happening. I've had echo cardiogram, stress test, ekg's, worn a 24 hour monitor.... all were 'unremarkable'. Yet when I saw my cardiologist last week he said to me ' so exactly how was your SVT diagnosed' . I think this has created a lack of confidence in him. He did send me to a electrophiologist and he was, just 'sign here and we sign you up for an ablation next week'. I'm thinking if I wear the loop for maybe 3 months? they get a good idea what's happening before doing the ablation which I will probably get down the road. Episodes seem to happen every 2 weeks, sometimes longer like 30 days.

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  • Posted

    Is the purpose of the Loop Monitor to locate the site of the errant electrical circuit?

    I apply firm pressure to left vagal/corotid in neck the moment I get the tachycardia onset

    flash/sensation and heart/ventricles stopped; get normal pulse in seconds, albeit a bit fast and slightly weak.

    The PSVT is usually preceded by back bending , instead of squatting, to pick things up and of course by dwelling too much on frustrating, vexing situations. Had a half dozen starts yesterday while dwelling on a friend's dilemma which I describe in a discussion with an American doctor at:

    Moderator comment: I have removed the link(s) directing to site(s) unsuitable for inclusion in the forums. If users want this information please use the Private Message service to request the details.

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  • Posted

    My understanding is that the loop monitor is a continuous EKG used to document dysrhythmias. Electrophysiologists, working in hospitals/clinics, then would work to find and fix problem areas by frying or freezing them (ablation). Apologies to one and all if I'm not accurate here. Regardless, I'll be most appreciative, for my forever, of the electrophysiologist who found and and fixed my complicated mess. My quality of life is now immensely better. I hope the same for all of you. Also, I hope this reply doesn't get fouled up as did my last. It wouldn't "send" at first, and when it did it's language barely qualified as English.

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    • Posted

      Assuming the Loop Monitor records each hour/day then you might note in notebook unusual feelings, anxiety states, frequent back bending, hydration levels , weather conditions, sleep adequacy, any overwhelming situations, multi-tasking, side of body you were laying on when SVT started. Always good to have a prescription for a blood test on hand, specifying troponin levels in addition to the usual LDL, etc., when SVT lasts 4 hours or more. Troponin over 1 indicates heart damage. Your data might give Doc a clue what's going on.

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  • Posted

    Well, today I had the loop monitor implanted, it was a bit painful. Dr. asked me how my pain tolerance was, I said it was pretty high. Note to self...... do not answer in that fashion. It was Painful!! I'm fine now, hours later although sore when I move much. How long can I expect to be sore....? Thank you

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