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  • Posted

    Hi I have heard of this before but I would be careful about taking aspirin every day as it can cause stomach problems.   I would want to check with my doctor first.  x

     

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  • Posted

    That's really interesting - thanks!   Maybe the reason for the 63% drop in premature deaths from COPD since 1982 is linked to the fact that most of us with COPD are at or past the age where many gp's routinely prescribe aspirin for cardiac health?

    I'll keep taking my daily aspirin

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  • Posted

    I would think a daily low-dose soluble aspirin (80mg) would be fine. That is the usual cardiac dosage. I also suspect that the anti-inflamatory property of aspirin is the actual way it helps COPD, so the effect may not be specific to aspirin - however, aspirin is still the safest anti-anfamation medicine as far as I know.
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  • Posted

    I was prescribed the cardiac support dose of 75mg way back, after 6 months on this dose;

    -  I developed acid reflux which needed treating by another medicine*

    -  I was brusing severely just by gripping a broom handle

    -  skin thinning etc.

    if it were only acid reflux that was the problem you can get enteric coated, however the severe bruising was something else the asprin was acting as a blood thinner and therefore would prevent blood clotting, helpful in some cases but detrimental in others.  So while keeping the blood thin to avoid a blood clot which could be detrimental the very same drug could cause excessive blood loss which could also be detrimental.  Also considerations should be taken into account for those with other medical conditions which may mean a longer time for wounds to heal with risk of further complications   Its a kill or cure drug and not intended to be consumed as a daily supplement, but rather as a short term pain relief or a prescribe daily dose longer term.

    In my case it was agreed with my doctor that I should discontinue taking asprin for cardiac support because of the severe side affects.

    It would be advisable for any one taking asprin daily to communicate to your GP you are doing so and at the very least consult with a pharmacist concerning interactions with other medicines prescribed.

    In addition its always advisable to be aware of both the cautions and helpful side of this drug taken on a daily basis.  But ideally it would be advisable to consult with your own doctor in the first instance.

    I will post a link separately which will first need to be approved by the moderators.  In the mean time you may want to google asprin dosage and look for the link to drugs dot com for asprin dosage guide and precautions. 

     

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  • Posted

    Hi I'm new to this but was wondering how many people with copd have been prescribed aspirin by their GP
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    • Posted

      Because many with COPD have associated problems, especially with CardioVascular problems, many may indeed be prescribed 'maintenance' low dose daily ASA.  It would not be uncommon for people who are COPDers to be on ASA.

      I myself have been advised to take it.

      Also, in view of the increased and widely advocated use of statins, perhaps patients are now using less ASA? I do not know the statistics.

      However, we are all aware of the incidence of hypercoagulation in COPDers as well as the pulmonary arterial hypertension which would benefit from anticoagulation therapies.

      However, having COPD does not automatically indicate a need for ASA

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    • Posted

      I'm confused by your association of aspirin with statins:  I've never heard of either of them being prescribed to replace the other.

      And I'm certainly not aware of whatever you're referring to in your second last paragraph, so I guess I'd better get googling to work out what you're actually talking about

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    • Posted

      I did not state they were being used in place of the other. They are two different medications that work in different manners.

      But they both contribute to reducing heart disease. Very often people taking statins also take ASA..on the prescription of physicians...it does not mean everyone should automatically take ASA.

      Because ASA reduces thrombosis,it also reduces stroke and heart attack.

      Statins improve cardiovascular health by reducing lipoproteins which contribute to plaque buildup and therefore clots which cause stroke and heart attack.

      There are risks to both medications, just as every medication carries risks.

       

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    • Posted

      I think you have been very clear lill and I understand exactly what you are talking about.   Thank you for the information.  Bev x
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    • Posted

      OH GOOD!

      Sometimes explanations can be difficult to figure out, but glad to know I related it well enough to make sense. smile

      You are welcome Bev

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