Behavioural issues with my 6 year old

Posted , 5 users are following.

I'm at my wits end! My son is 7 in July and whilst he is book smart and having no academic issues what so ever, He had very little impulse control when it comes to his behaviour in class and at home. He is several years ahead academically but he cannot sit still, he fidgets, he continuously talks when asked not to and does not listen. If you change his routine or say he can't have something he behaves completely irrationally and like a toddler and you cannot reason with him, if you ask him to stop having a paddy or be quiet he will continually insist on having the last work or making the last sound. He is very excitable and cannot sit still whilst reading or playing a video game (the latter of which is restricted to infrequent use). If he used the I bad he flaps and or wiggles his fingers constantly. They school have said because he is not suffering academically there is nothing they can do. Any advice? I'm nervous about going to the doctor as I do not want to label him but now I'm not sure I have a choice.

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13 Replies

  • Posted

    I meant iPad, silly corrective spelling!
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  • Posted

    this sounds excatly like my son was esp the fingers thing 

    i think your find he has Aspergers syndrome which is high functioning autisum 

    you have to find ways to cope hun .

    i had terriable time  with my son didnt get a diognoses untill he was 6 yrs then you are bascicly told to get on with it . my son had to have one to one education he couldnt do class room to many distractions , 

    when he has a paddy leave him somewhere safe to cool down no amount of talking or reasoning will get thru ,dont try to hold him your just make matters worse .

    we tend to be over sensistive to many things that most people dont even notice

    i still at 55 will have a fit if i dont take a label out of my clothing and it touches my skin i  like everything just so dont like people touching or moving my things my son is the same.by the way i had to wait till i was 46 for my diognoses

    dont like certain food textutes ,or certain odurs, certain sounds can still bring me to tears , so some of your childs behavoiur is proberly there reaction to there enveroment ,this has to be dealt with .

    , i am Aspergeres so is my son whos now 24 he had to go to special needs school not because he was dum but becasue he could not cope with the noise and the destrations of a standered class . he had 8 in his class .but i had to move countys to get it .

    i got thru school simply because school was stricter and i went to an all girls school i wouldnt have made it thru today . .  theres two books that are helpful 

    if your interested i will pm you . 

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  • Posted

    Nobody likes 'labels' but a syndrome doesn't have to be referred to in the standard way when you're discussing a person.

    My nephew had similar symptoms, but turned out to have ADHD.  He takes the tablets during term time but not on weekends and holidays.  He says he's happy with them because it helps him think more clearly, and quietly.

    Go to the doctor.  Stuff the fear of a label.  The main thing here is your son's future.  Perhaps the doc will refer to a child psychologist or may recognise a syndrome.  

     

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  • Posted

    Hi,

    My son is 6 and was diagnosed with ADHD last year. Your son sounds exaclty like mine. He is now on medication which helps a lot especially for focusing at school but we are finding this very hard at home coping with his constent talking, interuptions, demands for attention and overall hyper activity and behavious when we say no to him for somthing, His brother is 3 and starts to copy him which adds to the stress.

    Having a name for his problem is potentially a label but I personally find that helps come along with it. It also helps other parents and teachers understand that there is something different about your child and not judge quite so much which helps me feel less inadequate

     

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    • Posted

      if he is on ritlin you need to check this out has long term health efects 

      in america its classed as cat b drug and is thougth to lead to all kinds of long term health problems.just a thought you need to no what your dealing with . and the possible side effects .esp if he is so young.

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    • Posted

      yes, there are a number of risks and we have taken to decision to deal with the here and now risk/already real issues of a child growing up with low self estime, anxiety and inability to interact with others.

       

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    • Posted

      well thats what you have to do 

      personaly i would not give my child a drug that could lead to them becoming additiced to main stream drugs in later life or risk the early on set of dementia. there are many other ways to deal with this with much less risk . 

      the french have had a product on the market for over 25yrs with good results

      . and yes i do have some idea of what its like i have a son with Aspergers i was bitten and head butted many times and he was out of school most of the time . now his as normal as you can be with Aspergers in this crazy world .i hope it continues to work with out bringing on new problems in the future one hope is that some people say that that they dont need to be on it for ever. so thats hopefull

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  • Posted

    Ask for help from the head n go to Drs for camhs assessment x
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  • Posted

    This is a belated reply, sorry: there's an excellent book by clinical psychologist Tanya Byron.  I'm a cognitive behavioural therapist and see huge relevance and value in her work.  Can't remember the name of the book but recommend looking on Amazon - I've read extracts and it's good.  

    Also, a book available on Amazon, 'Understanding ADHD by Drs Green and Chee looks good.

    My brother had Aspergers and my nephew as ADHD.  I see shades of it in other relatives.    

    Get the books:  get the assessment.  It might help to bring your child peace.

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  • Posted

    Update: my son has seen his GP and the initial and of course unofficial diagnosis of High Functioning Autism. He is now waiting for contact from the community peadiatricion for further assessing etc. Thanks all. 
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    • Posted

      If there had been a diagnosis and support for my brother, who had Aspergers but wasn't diagnosed until he was in his sixties, his life would have been a whole lot different; more meaningful, better understanding and infinitely happier.  It's a blessing that you have the diagnosis.  
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  • Posted

    Apologies for my absence, I have had my messages and notifications I have not read. Update, my boy has been officially diagnosed as autistic. A lot of people have asked my why bother seeking a diagnosis, what will it change? Including his father, my husband. Well his diagnosis has changed a lot of things for the better. His school have put some amazing resources in place for him that we will not have gotten if I had not sought a diagnosis. He has been given a weekly lesson plan which shows which teacher is working with him, what lessons he does things independently. He has also been put in group sessions to help with his social interactions, where he is being helped to manage his impulse control and social awareness of others. He is doing amazingly well and now we understand him better we can help with some of the behavioural issues he has and we are all the better for it. Yes it can be horrible to label children but in our case if was definitely the right thing to do!
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  • Posted

    Also thank you for all the advice and messages of understanding and support. It's always nice to know people get where you are coming from.
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