Benefits of HRT 14 years after menopause?

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Hi I'm 54 and had an early menopause 14 years ago due to chemotherapy for breast cancer. I have since found out I have BRCA2 and have had double mastectomy and oophorectomy. Now that I have reduced my cancer risk through surgery I can consider taking HRT. Do you know if it Is likely to be of any great benefit so long after the start of my menopause? My typical symptoms are hot flushes, very poor sleep, lack of concentration and brain fog, muscle and joint aches and osteopoenia.

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  • Posted

    Hi.  Its difficult to give advice on this issue.  I think your doctor would be better able to advise.  What I have found with all the symptoms folk are listing are that they are very similar to those of M.E. (or Chronic Fatigue Syndrome as it is also known), which I have had for some years.  Its possible you have it after all you've been through.  If your doctor thinks HRTis worth taking, then maybe its worth a try.  But maybe need to go easy on your body for a while, take some supplements and healthy diet too, as you may improve with time.  Sorry I can't be more helpful.   
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  • Posted

    Hi Claret..

    I cant say .... I am natural remedies only, HRT is not an option for me, do to family history of cancer, I have read that to start HRT after menopause is even more risky, but I am no Doctor, so take the Doctors advice... 

    dont think I would be wanting HRT with what you have been through sweetie..

    wish you all the very best.. Jay.. x

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  • Posted

    Hi I'm sorry I can't help with advice but couldn't read this without replying to say well done getting through so much , you must be a strong lady I'm sure you will get through another hurdle , there's so much wonderful support on this website , take care x x
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  • Posted

    Hi Claret59

    I think you are right and should talk to your consultant.  None of us are qualified to give you such advice even if any of us have medical knowledge.  Your consultant knows your full medical history.  Most of your symptoms do seem to respond to proper levels of B vitamins in your diet or by supplement.  As far as I can tell this wouldn't do you harm to try after discussing with your consultant if you feel you want to try this first.

    Again I must agree with other comments that your are very plucky to have taken the surgical route.  Good luck for the future. 

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  • Posted

    Thank you everyone for your replies and words of encouragement.  I'll make an appointment with my consultant and discuss the issues with him.

    Clare

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  • Posted

    Hi there it sounds like you have have a realy bad time with all that you have had and I realy feel for you. I have only been on my hrt a week, so it's early days but I can say that I'm feeling a lot better in myself already, I'm taking premique 0.3 mg so low dose. I personally think that after all you have been through you deserve a break, so I would suggest talking hrt through with your doctor. Hope this he

    lps

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  • Posted

    I have had lumpectomy and many mammograms for many years  as a result of a rogue breast surgeon who carried out unneccesary ops and cleavage sparing masectomies.  When i went to my review of this (by those investigating him and checking status i was told that there was a small increase in risk taking HRT (as i asked on way out) but as the breast tissue is sensitive to radiation and i have had approx 12-14 mammograms on his insistence, i decided the risk wasn't worth taking. Apparently natural progesterone is better and i am trying a cream now.

    Good luck whatever you choose.

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  • Posted

    Hi All.  Just to keep you updated.  Didn't get as far as the consultant as my husband spoke to a GP friend.  He pointed out that although my breast cancer was 14 years ago there is a chance that I have some left over cancer cells lying dormant and HRT could possibly activate them!  So not worth the risk as far as I'm concerned.

    Thanks again to everyone who responded.

     

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    • Posted

      hi Claret59, having read about the risks of HRT I was not keen to encourage you.  When I went through the menopause I decided no matter how I felt I wouldnt take any HRT.  I would just be careful about attributing all your symptoms to hormones as they are very similar to those of CFS/M.E.  Maybe you should check that out.  Jaynee sent me a couple of emails about herbal remedies to try. Maybe if you contact her she could help.  i will try to pass on her info, but not sure I can do it (my computer skills!). i hope you get some help. Some folk seem to think Menoforce which contains sage helps hot flushes.  regards, Anne 
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  • Posted

    Go to Perimenopause or anxiety and you will find info on vitamins etc.  I am going out today armed with a list, which I meant to do earlier in week but too many aches and pains - does it ever end??.You might want to consider doing the same. It cant hurt and may help. good luck!
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  • Posted

    Hi Claret

    here is some info about b vits benefits ... this may help...

    here is one of two snippets... other i will send in a mo...

    The vitamins that make up the B complex play a key role in maintaining health during the menopausal years. They are necessary for strong adrenal glands, a healthy nervous system and the conversion of carbohydrates into the glucose we need for energy.

    Vitamin B, keeps the mucous membranes healthy, including those of the vagina. It is also an antioxidant, especially in collaboration with vitamin C. It helps alleviate memory loss, decreases sensitivity to noise, improves concentration, relieves depression and corrects loss of appetite. Good sources of Bx are whole cereals, beans, potatoes and nuts.

    B2 is responsible for the release and activity of a variety of hormones, including estrogen. It also helps keep skin, nails and hair healthy. Good sources of B2 are milk and eggs.

    B12 lifts depression, reduces anxiety, helps decrease mood swings and eliminates fatigue. Vegetarian sources containing significant amounts of B12 include several seaweeds such as arame, wakame and nori, as well as pickles, sauerkraut, tempeh, tamari, miso and B12-enriched soy products. Animal-derived sources include eggs, milk and fish. Food supplements rich in B12 are blue green algae, chlorella, barley green and spirulina.

    B6 (pyridoxine) is a natural diuretic which is effective in reducing water retention. It is useful to reduce bloating that can appear before your period. It helps prevent depression and promotes calm moods and restful sleep. It also interacts with estrogen in the body. This vitamin is found in most foods and a deficiency is fairly rare, however hormone therapy can deplete the body's levels of B6 and decreased levels can lead to depression.

    Niacin (vitamin B3) helps with the body's production of estrogen and other sex hormones. It reduces blood cholesterol, dilates blood vessels and is sometimes prescribed to prevent premenstrual headaches. It may improve insomnia, nervousness, confusion, anxiety, memory loss, irritability, apathy and depression.

    If you're using B vitamins to help prevent hot flashes, be sure to use the form of niacin called niacinamide. Other forms of niacin dilate the blood vessels, which can cause flushing and worsen hot flashes, rather than relieve them.

    Folic acid helps the body manufacture and use estrogen. It helps reduce forgetfulness, soothe irritability, correct insomnia and promotes the formation of healthy red blood cells, which is why a deficiency of this vitamin can lead to anemia. It may help prevent precancerous changes in the cervix. A deficiency of folic acid has been associated with depression. Sources of folic acid include green leafy vegetables, nuts, beans and peas.

    Jay x

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  • Posted

    Hi Claret .. snippet 2 😃 maybe useful for you and others ... 

    Everyone needs B-vitamins for good health. Without them we can suffer from a variety of serious ailments. For a woman going through perimenopause, B-vitamins can be essential for effectively managing symptoms.   

    Adrenal fatigue, for example, is a common secondary condition for many women going through perimenopause. B-vitamins support healthy adrenal function, along with calming and maintaining a healthy nervous system. Many women also suffer with mood swings during perimenopause. Both B12 and B6 vitamins aid in the production of neurotransmitters such as serotonin, a key brain chemical needed to stabilize moods and promote feelings of wellness and contentment.

    For women who suffer with brain fog, and memory issues in perimenopause, low levels of B6 could be part of the problem. Depression, confusion, and an inability to concentrate are all associated with B6 deficiency. Vertigo, dizziness, and heart palpitations are also common complaints from women going through perimenopause. All of these symptoms have been associated with (among other things) a B12 deficiency. Vitamin B6 can also help with stubborn weight gain in perimenopause. It is key in the breakdown and utilization of carbohydrates, fats, and proteins in our diet, and is necessary for a healthy metabolism - both which can help manage weight.

    Supplementing with vitamin B6 is also a good option during menopause and can provide more rapid relief than diet alone. To avoid an imbalance that can result when one vitamin becomes deficient, use a supplement that contains a full complement of all members of the B-complex family. Doses of 50 to 100 milligrams per day help promote general health and wellness. However, during the stress of menopause, your requirements for B6 may increase to as much as 300 milligrams per day, says Lieberman.

    Jay xx

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    • Posted

      Hi Jay , very interesting for supplements do you need different one's or is there a combined one for the B vit that will help. 

                                                            Chris

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    • Posted

      hi Christina...

      in my peri experience ... of almost 9 years 😑 its actually B6 that needs boosting for peri and post meno... i doc gave me it years ago when i first had troubles but never said why ... so I used them and never replaced, never realised how good they were for this... also get a VIt B 12 blood test check that as it can diminish and you have no energy.... i also have shots of B12 .. ( the celebritys have them anyway ) new fad for them.. crazy.... 

      Vit B 6 i restarted a few weeks ago and wow I have lost weight ( the peri muffin which was appearing) I am not over weight and dont want to lose anymore ... but it certainly helps, I also take vit B 1 ( thiamine) 300mg as that stops mozzys biting you ( i live in spain) and is good for you... 

      I take 150mg of B6 at moment, i split them  that suits me for now... it breaks down certain things in body and assists in weight loss.... 😆

      Jayx 

       

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    • Posted

      Hi thank you very much  helpful information 

                                                   Chris x

                                       

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