Best Inhalor or Bronciectisis

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Hi guys

I'm feeling a bit down this week, the 3 weeks of doxycyclin have really limited my going out to have fun this xmas. Don't think I will bother with new years either as when I tried to drink xmas eve on these they made me feel really drowsy. I was wondering if any of you guys found any certain inhalors better for your breathing that others, maybe one that paticularly brought your mucus up easy with not much fuss?

Hope you have all had a great xmas and that 2016 will be a better year for us all. I just want to be well without having to clear my lungs constantly and without it getting stuck. I read that they are developing new antibiotic inhalors for sufferers of bx and cf over the next 5 years so I hope we see them soon.

Simon

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8 Replies

  • Posted

    The older I get the less inclined I am to treat alcohol as an automatic relaxant, which is good when we all know that alcohol reduces the effectiveness of antibiotic and steroid/corciscosteroid medecines which are our rocks.

    I now go for quality rather than quantity when it comes to alcohol - one nice glass of wine or a craft beer as a reasonably regular tipple. I still have 'nights out' with friends and special parties where I might lapse a bit, but it's the automatic reach that I'm managing to cut out.

    On inhalers I find Symbicort to be the best for it's combined beta-agonist (airway opening and broncospasm reduction) and anti-inflammatory (mucus production) effect. It's really more of an asthma drug, but my pulmonologist prescribed it in the early days of analysis when they were not sure what disease I had; every time I drop it I can feel the difference and revert back to it; I have notice one or two other posters metioning it on here as well.

    Only problem is that it's expensive, unless you are on a national health service. I'm a non-resident Brit so I pay and on a two puffs twice a day dose it costs me about GBP 20 (US $40). I cut down to one dose twice a day when I'm on form.

    Yes it will be great to have antibiotics we can inhale - shouldhopefully it will increase the range of antibiotics that we can take without having to nebulise or IV - many of te more recent synthetic antibis do not come in tablet form. Nebulising antibiotics can give me taccycardia (very rapid heart beat at 160 bpm), so that useful route is not available to me.

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    • Posted

      Errata: should have said "...it costs me about GBP 27 (US$40) per month"
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  • Posted

    Simon I am sorry you had a rough Christmas. I've had a few! I have had bronchiectasis for 65 years and so all through childhood, teenage and adult life. It's never stopped me living a good life but I have had some missed parties, even holidays, along the way. Not all antibiotics are affected by alcohol but nowadays I don't bother so much as I did when I was young and crazy!

    The sooner you accept that the key to managing bronchiectasis is clearing your chest every day the better your life will be. Nowadays there are lots of meds to help but according to my specialist at the Brompton clearing the chest daily (twice daily if bad) is the basis of treatment. I can't do nebulisers (they make me breathless) but I use ventolin to open the tubes before I do my physio and four puffs of serotide daily. It varies between people - I have tried lots of meds which were no use at all.

    Good luck with your life. I've travelled, gone to festivals, been married for over 40 years and worked until I was 66. Keep your chest clear, cough that filthy rubbish up (I make a few discreet visits to the ladies to have a cough if I'm out) and rest when you need to. Life goes on!

    Good luck.

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  • Posted

    Hi Simon

    I use Seretide 500mg twice daily  2 puffs   but its not good for me to get  mucus clear  

    The best thing i found to clear the muscus was  mucoclear  3%  nebs    ( its only saline)   but when i put them into nebuliser   it helps to clear out the mucus 

    ing 

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  • Posted

    Cheers guys. I swear down i still don't understand how 3 to 4 years ago i was having chest infections maybe a couple of times a year and now im clearing mucus daily. I don't get how it's gone from that to daily mucus. Its a pain in the arse. Need a cure for this they do.
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  • Posted

    It's lung damage chum and no cure likely. They can help you control it but it's not going anywhere. My mucus production varies but at the moment it's awful - it's a nuisance to say the least. Just keep on getting rid of it - and check to see if there's a bug lurking that's making a difference to the amount. And lay off dairy products or at least cut them down. Ive had a bit of chocolate over Christmas and that certainly hasn't helped.

    Cheers and all the best for 2016.

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    • Posted

      Really? I eat loads of chocolate and dairy. Maybe i should cut down. It is a horrible condition. I hate coughing and choking every day.

      And maybe the damage was always there and had just got worse over the years. Wish they had diagnosed me earlier. Pain in the butt.

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    • Posted

      It certainly is a pain but I don't know any better having had it ever since I was a toddler. It isn't a formal medical diagnosis to cut back on dairy products but a GP I used to see many years ago recommended it as being worth a try. If I eat cheese I am instantly I'll and I moderate dairy products as much as is sensible. I told an eminent professor at the Brompton hospital about it and he said that it has been noted anecdotally that cutting out dairy products can help certain bronchiectasis patients reduce mucus levels but they can't prove it scientifically. He thought it was worth a go anyway..
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