Bio Magnesium for RLS

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Recommended Bio Magnesium from Pharma Nova. A lady suffering from RLS heard about these on the internet, they combine 3 types of magnesium, she says within a couple of weeks her legs were calmer and she now feels "reborn" Has anyone tried these tablets? I am now taking 1 200mgm after food, too soon to tel if they are helping as I have only taken 2, her's hoping!

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  • Posted

    PLEASE be sure to report back on this, Joan. I've never heard there are three types of magnesium, but anything  that helps...helps, eh?

    Good luck--and restful evenings.

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  • Posted

    Hi Joan

    I had really bad RLS for many years but I am now almost sympton free but not perfect.  I have always taken a little bit of Mg in case it did some good.  I was trying out a large dose of  magnesium to get the last bit and took 1500mg of magnesium diglycinate.   My symptoms returned for two sleepless nights so I stopped and after about a week I was back to normal.     Was it the magnesium? or did I accidently eat something I shouldn't have?     A medical person interested in RLS wants me to try again to see if it is related to the magnesium but I am a bit scared that it might not go away again if things go wrong.    If I have a few more good nights sleep then I'll give it another go.   I still take 500mg in the morning in the hope that it helps with cramps but I think I'll cut it out copmpletely for a month and see what happens.  Maybe zero RLS is just at my fingertips!!

    Other people on this forum report that Magnesium has worked wonders for them which once again shows the fickelness of this frustrating disease.   Same applies to the response to proprietry drugs that seem to vary from ""nearly killed me"" to "cured me for the last 15 years""      I think its all luck or your genes or something mysterious.

    I hope it works for you and you never have to think about RLS again.

    Cheers

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    • Posted

      I think the reason the magnesium made your RLS worse is because it is a dopamine antagonist and at night we want a dopamine agonist.  The following discussion is more understandable then some of the scientific articles that explain this phenomena:

      "Feel free to correct everything I'm about to say which is wrong, but this is my guess. If I wasn't so lazy, I'd put some refs in.

      -- We know that magnesium, through it's NMDA antagonist actions, decreases the (phasic) release of dopamine.

      --We also know that magnesium decreases the release of acetylcholine.

      -- In other words, it's like magnesium hypersensitizes the autoreceptors that should govern release for dopamine and acetylcholine.

      --Acetylcholine and dopamine release are important in the treatment of ADHD.

      --So what exactly is the benefit of magnesium for people with ADHD (meaning doses outside of those for general health benefits?

      I've wondered this personally, because nothing turns me into a hyperfocused, yet brainfogged mess with affective anxiety as well as taking magnesium with a stimulant. Magnesium lowers noreadrenaline levels, too, right? But wouldn't a reduction in acetylcholine and dopamine release increase the noradrenergic effect of stimulants? Similarly, magnesium at night makes me fidgety restless, and have almost a sense of akathasia. I've been trying to figure out why I'm the only person who seems to feel this way, then it dawned on me that decreased release of dopamine, acetylcholine would certainly cause brainfog. This is the only theory I can think of as to why. Anyone else have a better explanation?"

       

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    • Posted

      This may be why some people do not get relief from magnesium.  They take too much too late at night.  While it seems magnesium is necessary for the production of dopamine (something we with RLS have plenty of in our brains) it INHIBITS the release of that dopamine into the central nervous system.  No release of dopamine, no quiet legs and no sleep.

      See second to last line of the following unbelievably confusing scientific article:

      The effects of adenosine and magnesium ion (Mg2+) on striatal dopamine release were studied in awake rats by in vivo microdialysis. The mean striatal basal levels of dopamine release at Mg2+ free perfusate were 56.95 +/- 5.30 fmol/sample (for 20 min). By varying the Mg2+ levels in perfusate from 0 mmol/L to 1, 10 or 40 mmol/L, the dopamine release was inhibited by Mg2+ in a level-dependent manner. Perfusion with modified Ringer's solution containing zero Mg2+ and from 5 to 50 mumol/L adenosine, non-selective adenosine agonist, as well as 0.1 mumol/L 2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CCPA), selective adenosine A1 agonist, showed no effect on dopamine release. However, from 5 to 50 mumol/L adenosine and from 0.1 to 1 mumol/L CCPA plus Mg2+ (1 and 40 mumol/L) perfusion decreased the dopamine release. This inhibitory effect of adenosine and CCPA on striatal dopamine release was enhanced by an increase in extracellular Mg2+ levels. Levels of 50 mumol/L of 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dimethylxanthine (CPT), a selective adenosine A1 receptor antagonist, in perfusate increased the dopamine release under conditions both with and without Mg2+. This stimulatory effect of CPT on striatal dopamine release was reduced by an increase in extracellular Mg2+ levels. As a result, CPT antagonized the inhibitory effects of adenosine and CCPA on dopamine release under conditions of the presence and absence of Mg2+. These results suggest that the inhibition of striatal dopamine release by adenosine was mediated by adenosine A1 receptor. This inhibition was intensified by Mg2+. This study also revealed that the concentrations of Mg2+, which ranged from physiological to supraphysiological, reduced the striatal dopamine release; furthermore it was found that the physiological concentration of Mg2+ potentiated the effects of adenosine agonists, but inhibited adenosine antagonist. Thus, the present study, using in vivo microdialysis preparations, suggests Mg2+ inhibits the calcium ion channels and enhances the adenosinergic function in the central nervous system.

       

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    • Posted

      Thanks Udon

      I'm glad you didn't give too many references or I'd have to admit to being too lazy to read them.

      I am but a humble engineer and I can't comment on your explanation.   I hope there is someone who might be able to help.   It sounds like you are saying that magnesium is unlikely to help with RLS.    But it helps some people.

      Cheers

      Graham

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    • Posted

      1500mg is an overdose. For most people 400mg is an appropriate dose. If you take more, your mineral balance gets disrupted, which can lead to RLS in itself. I would recommend to try 400mg next time, early in the evening, and see if you can find the exact dose which fits you right. It's all about the right dose, it's not about the more the better.
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    • Posted

      Hi Linda

      Your post is well timed.

      I just got around to trying Mg again.

      I bought some Mg tablets   150mg of Mg from Mg Citrate

      The manufacturer recomends three tabs a day for pregnant women so that sounded like a good starting point.   Bad move   I lost a night's sleep to RLS which I haven't done for many months..   Cut the dose back to the recomended 1 tab a day in the morning and I dont know if its beneficial because my FODMAP diet is still working.    I think I am getting fewer cramps at night but its hard to know.   I'm just trying to fine tune things at the moment.  I thought some Mg might help expand the diet a bit.   I've only been on it for a week so no benefit yet but no harm either!

      Its worth trying because it works for many

      Cheers

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    • Posted

      I tried Bio Magnesium tabs and combined with 3mgm Patches worked a treat, really thought I had cracked RLS for good. bad thinking! the patches ceased to work and so did the magnesium tabs. Changed medication to gabapentin 900mgm a day, these are not working either. Seriously thinking of trying the Diet as it seems to work for many. Thanks for your input, 

       

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    • Posted

      Hi Graham, indeed, fine tuning is the way to go. Apart from Mg it can also help to pay attention to other minerals. If the Mg doesn't work out for you sufficiently, try an electrolyte solution which contains different minerals. You can buy them sports shops. Using seasalt, rich in potassium, while you're cooking also doesn't hurt. Many people have a potassium deficiency, due to using too much kitchen salt in their diet.
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  • Posted

    After suffering for 16 years with RLS, I have found taking 2 x dihydrocodeine tablets in the evening has virtually stopped evening & overnight symptoms. Before then I had to keep standing up or walking for most of the evening & suffered sleepless nights, to the point where I couldn't go anywhere in the evenings. I occasionally get symptoms in the afternoon and now use  a "Transdermal Magnesium Chloride" spray (from neme genie) on my legs which has so far worked very well and saved me having to take more tablets.

     

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    • Posted

      Hi Hazel

      That's interesting.  Thank you for that.    I will get some and try it out next time I have a problem.  

      I went out to dinner last night and wasnt sure of some of the food but what the heck I was enjoying the company of two daughters.   The staff were actually very helpful with finding every gluten free thing they could and getting me to try it.  Unfortunately they were so good I couldn't bring myself to explain the FODMAP diet.  Now I am awake and getting jumpy,  just the time to try out this spray.   Well next time I will be ready.

      Thanks again.

      Graham

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    • Posted

      Hi Hazel

      So pleased you have found some relief in the form of dihydrocodeine tablets. Have you tried all medication i.e. roporinole, pram, patches, gabapentin. I am interested as I see a Neuorologist next week and having been on all this medication and none has worked, maybe I could ask him about dihydrocodeine tabs. I presume you have these prescribed for you by your Doctor.

      Thank you so much for that and sharing it.

      Joan

       

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