Black spot in field of vision

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Hi all a couple of days ago it seemed as though my pupil had projected itself into my field of vision, i say pupil as it was black and rather a large spot, it went wherever my eye went, but was well strange and felt almost like I could reach out to touch it only lasted seconds but was very strange indeed, just wondered if this was an eye smptom of some kind

Thanks in advance

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8 Replies

  • Posted

    It sounds like a floater and you should see your Optometrist or GP sooner rather than later.

    This is what Moorfield's say:

    Causes of flashes and floaters

    Flashes and floaters happen because of changes in the vitreous, the clear, jelly-like substance that fills the inside of your eyeball.  The vitreous jelly shrinks as you get older, and slowly pulls away from the inside surface of the eye.  This shrinking and separation or detachment of the vitreous from the retina is a common phenomenon, particularly in people over 50 years of age, and causes no retinal damage in nine out of 10 patients.  It is known as a posterior vitreous detachment.

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  • Posted

    Moorfield's also say the following:

    Treatment for flashes and floaters

    Flashes and floaters rarely lead to any serious complications, so you generally don’t need any treatment for them.  If they are troublesome, the effect of floaters might be minimised by wearing dark glasses.  This will help especially in bright sunlight or when looking at a brightly lit surface.  In many cases, the flashes disappear with time and the floaters get less noticeable as your brain adjusts to the jelly change. 

    If your flashes or floaters become much worse, you should consult your GP, your optometrist (optician) or visit our specialist A&E department to exclude any serious problems.  If you see a black shadow or curtain effect or you suddenly loose vision, you should go to your nearest A&E without delay.

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    • Posted

      Thank you for your quick reply, I have to see my optician next month so hopefully he will know what it is, i went in to see him and told him this and I said to him lol i bet youve not heard of that before, to which he grimmaced and said he had i should have asked him then what he thought it was dunno why i didnt lol 
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    • Posted

      Karen, perhaps you should go and see your GP and tell him you have a massive black floater in your eye.  He can do a basic examination and will refer you if he thinks it is necessary.

      I wouldn't leave it for a month.  As Moorfield's say, 9 times out of 10, it will be nothing but if it is something, you want to be dealt with immediately.

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    • Posted

      Thank you I am seeing my gp in the morning about other things but will mention it to him, as for the other reply below how the heck they know whats wrong with my eye if they havent examined it am now going to report them but thank you for your kind words and help
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  • Posted

    karen570

    An optician only knows about glasses--not eyes themselves. I started going to an ophthalmologist when I was in my 30s. An eye exam done by a real doctor is no more expensive than one done by an optrician. I think that's what they call themselves. They are not doctors and know very little about eye problems

     

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    • Posted

      Hi bagladyNYC, I don't know about the system in the US but in the UK you can't juct turn up at the Ophthalmologist's clinic, you need to be referred.  An Optometrist isn't medically qualified but is trained to examine eyes and spot some basic conditions.  The Optometrist can then refer the patient to an eye clinic and an Ophthalmologist.  A GP can also refer the patient.
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    • Posted

      I had no idea people had to have a referral. We don't in the US. I find optometrists often speak when the should keep their mouths shut. There is one in my ophthalmolostist's office who checks vision fo glasses. I have wet mac, and she's always wanting to know if my sugar is under control. I almost walked out on her. She thinks she knows a lot more than she does. I have a doctor with whom I discuss my blood sugar and it is not her. My blood sugar has never been so out of control that it would cause me to have symtoms of wet mac.

      Sorry you have to go through that. Of course, there are good ones and bad ones. :-)

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