BPH AND FATIGUE

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After being diagnosed with BPH, I always feel tired even after a long night of sleep. I feel the tiredness in the morning between 8 am and 9 am, it last few minutes and after that I am okay and the same thing in the afternoon. Have you experienced anything like that ? Please share your experiences. Thanks

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  • Posted

    Perhaps you are not alone. I have endured BPH for many years. At age 74, for the disturbed sleep through the night for pee breaks, I am ready for a nap around 11 a.m. without fail each day. I am retired so I can freely indulge. But perhaps it's to be expected. No such thing as a truly restful sleep in the night if you are awakened every 2-3 hrs for bathroom visits. The alternative is one of the myriad of "procedures" discussed here frequently, with their pros and cons. Thus far, I am accepting the fatigue over the procedure route.

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  • Posted

    One of the reasons I had my prostate fixed is the belief that persistent interrupted sleep, and being tired during the day, couldn't be good for prolonging my lifespan, cardiovascular or cognitive health. This belief is often touted by sleep doctors more than urologists. Also, retaining urine (especially, without CIC) has its own risks.

    I picked the procedure I liked the most and took the leap. Finally, after decades. I should have done it years ago.

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  • Posted

    Marty -- "Retaining urine" may be a relative concept. For my 30+ years with this condition, annual ultrasound checks suggest no appreciable retention factor. i.e. When I void, I pretty much get it all. The problem for me is having to avoid again in another 2 hrs or less. My uro suggests my situation need not be treated beyond alfuzosin therapy UNLESS abnormal retention comes into play. And he has many times "volunteered" a TURP procedure as an ultimate solution (he does a lot of them). But I politely decline each time and he is OK with it. (I decline, btw, for the harsh TURP aftermath stories that have been shared in these forums. I've only been following the forum for maybe a couple of years. I have suffered BPH since the 1980's. I hope I can last another ten years with the status quo, while praying for a miracle pill to "cure" this curse once and for all. BTW, my bro-in-law had TURP and he tolerated the aftermath well. RE, etc. But it's just not for me. Yet.

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    • Posted

      Owen,

      TURP is a 4 letter word to me. I dont like its odds of RE. While holding off you may also wish to keep up with some newer BPH procedures such as PAE and Aquablation. IMHO the former is a no brainer for most men as it has no appreciable downsides and very little recovery; the latter is very new and TURP like, but with a fraction of the downsides (small chance of RE). When the right procedure comes along, you'll know it.

      Before my procedure I had such difficulty going to the city, theatre, etc. Now, there are actually places ive been to multiple times where I still dont know where the mens room is. That was something i dreamed about prior to my aquablation 6 weeks ago. If you're happy, no reason to change anything, except id still look at PAE!

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    • Posted

      Thanks Marty. I am on a Medicare Advantage health plan. Do you know if aquablation is covered? Also, the nearest practitioner of that procedure to me is in Chicago. I'd have to check them out further. And...this is not a permanent procedure, yes? Like TURP, needs doing again after "x" years?

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  • Posted

    Owen

    The general consensus is TURPs last ten years, but there are exceptions. Aquablations are expected to have a similar life span to TURP as they remove comparable levels of tissue. I am 63 so I dont follow Medicare.

    As it was just FDA approved in 2019, and has better outcomes than TURP, I would expect Medicare and your Advantage plan would soon cover this. Your Advantage plan may be more flexible. Call Procept (the aquabeam robot mfr) to see if theyve had success with your plan. They have a dedicated team that tries to get insurers to pay. They can also refer you to doctors. Google Procept for their number.

    Some doctors and hospitals are interested in building their aquablation patient base and may help you with the financial side as well.

    PAE has a shorter lifespan (a couple of years is typical) but, if it works, its a great option while you wait for improvements in available procedures. I had one done five years ago. It partially worked, but my median lobe was not cooperative. It's a relatively easy procedure for the patient. Unfortunately, many Urologists play down PAE because it is performed by an Interventional Radiologist. IMO.

    Marty

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  • Posted

    Hi all,

    Thanks for all messages about BPH. I wake up once or sometimes twice for a wee. I drink 2 1/2 L of water every day from morning to afternoon (mouthful of water). From 4 pm, no liquid (tea, coffee or water).

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  • Posted

    Hi Martyr,

    My BPH is not too bad I think . Urgent urination can be a problem when I am at work, sometimes I can hold the wee for few minutes before going to the toilet and sometimes I cannot hold it, my option is to find the toilet. Wake up once or sometimes twice. Last night, I slept from 9 pm to 5 am without waking up.

    I am on special diet for my BPH : No red meat, diary products, no processed food, no coffee or tea before bedtime or alcohol. I eat a lot vegetables, brown pasta, brown rice etc..

    Still on Active Surveillance for my PSA

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    • Posted

      Yes, very light symptoms, relatively speaking. The fact you have issues during the day and not at night almost sounds like an over active bladder (OAB) than BPH as the cause.

      In terms of your sleepiness, I am not sure. I wonder if you have sleep apnea. That would require a sleep study to diagnose. You would get that done by a sleep doctor, not a urologist. And, yes, sleep apnea can cause daytime OAB during the day and Nocturia.

      Im not a doctor. Just thinking out of the box. Good luck!

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