BPH or Prostatitis but still normal PSA levels Possible ?

Posted , 8 users are following.

Hi,

I have been offered a PSA test and physical Postrate examination due to some symptoms that I am experiencing since few months. I have read few articles whereby there is an argument that raised PSA levels does not always imply BPH and there are other reasons for PSA levels to go high. What I want to know is if the reverse is also true ? Meaning, could PSA levels be still normal inspite of having BPH or Prostatitis (for someone at age of 37)? Had anyone had similar experience or perhaps any medical practitioner here could clarify this ? Thanks.

0 likes, 12 replies

Report / Delete

12 Replies

  • Posted

    Don't know that there is a correlation between PSA and BPH.  PSA may be indicative of prostatic cancer and the resulting enlargement of the prostate.  BPH is Benign Prostate Hyperplasia where the prostate is grqwing larger as a function of age.  Key word here is BENIGN;  there is no cancer.  MY PSA levels have remained constant despite a growing prostate.  Hope you find this helpful.

    Report / Delete Reply
  • Posted

    My Gp would do the physical exam of the prostate first (DRE) as that in itself can cause PSA to rise.

    A range of things as well as illness can give a rise in PSA, cycling , running and ejaculation to name some common ones.

    The DRE will usualy determine if the prostate is enlarged or if the requirement for further investigation as in a biopsy is present. I had a PSA test done a week after the DRE and swellings and nodules were found. interestingly my PSA was and still is in the normal range. Biopsy discovered abnormal tissue not thought to be immediatley cancerous and i now have a 6 monthly PSA test to monitor. I have moderate BPH and am experimenting with alternative treatments at the moment, the meds prescribed by my doctor gave me una ceptable side effects. Please get yourself checked out then at least you know where you are and can plan your treatment. loads on info on this forum

    Good health and best wishes to you.

    Report / Delete Reply
    • Posted

      Thanks. Just to clarify 

      "My Gp would do the physical exam of the prostate first (DRE) as that in itself can cause PSA to rise" - So should the PSA not be done prior to DRE to get proper values as DRE can influence PSA results ?

      Report / Delete Reply
    • Posted

      Most doctors like to check to see if any physical cause can be found B4 PSA is done, it can be very worrying to find that you have a high PSA.

      My own GP practice, a great team of very experienced docs say this is best practice. If the DRE is all normal then in all liklihhod no PSa needed.

      Report / Delete Reply
  • Posted

    I've had BPH for 15 to 20 years and have never had a PSA result above 4, and the PSA has remained in a stable range.

    Report / Delete Reply
  • Posted

    At your age BPH is unlikely, but not out of the question. Prostatitis is very common and probably the culprit. I would get it checked out. The PSA being low is possible with Prostatitis, because the prostate usually has to be enlarged in order to increase PSA, so if it isn't then PSA can be at normal levels. Usually there is some increase in size as when I had Prostatitis I had trouble urinating. That was the first symptom, then I had a clear discharge after urinating and pain. Get it checked out.

    Report / Delete Reply
    • Posted

      Thanks for your reply. Can I ask how long did it took you to get rid of Prostatitis and did the symptoms ever came back ? What was the treatment ? Just want to know if it is completely curable and via oral medication only (i..e without any invasive methods like surgery etc)
      Report / Delete Reply
    • Posted

      There is no invasive treatment. I was on Cipro for a month and that seemed to get rid of it. The funny thing is my doctor couldn't find any evidence of me having it, but it did get better with Cipro. It takes a while for it to go away and mine could have been enlarged due to Crohn's disease flare, so not really sure it was from bacteria. None the less, it is a stuborne thing to get rid of and it is painful.

      Report / Delete Reply
    • Posted

      Craig and Geek,

      Doctors still don't know for sure why antibiotics are sometimes effective with nonbacterial prostatitis. Two theories are: (1) the anti-inflammatory effect of antibiotics (as opposed to the anti-bacterial effect; and that there may indeed be bacteria involved but not enough to be detected by the tests.

      Jim

      Report / Delete Reply
  • Posted

    My understanding is that PSA level doesn't rise unless there's a problem. If PSA is normal for your age there is unlikely to be any major problem. If it is raised, it could be cancer, prostatitis or BPH. That's when the investigations need to establish what the problem is.

    Report / Delete Reply
  • Posted

     I have had both BPH and Prostatitis and my PSA has always been normal. 
    Report / Delete Reply

Join this discussion or start a new one?

New discussion Reply

Report or request deletion

Thanks for your help!

We want the forums to be a useful resource for our users but it is important to remember that the forums are not moderated or reviewed by doctors and so you should not rely on opinions or advice given by other users in respect of any healthcare matters. Always speak to your doctor before acting and in cases of emergency seek appropriate medical assistance immediately. Use of the forums is subject to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy and steps will be taken to remove posts identified as being in breach of those terms.

newnav-down newnav-up