Bronchiectasis & acid reflux

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I've recently been diagnosed with an acid reflux problem, which helps explain the dry cough (that I'd assumed was just a feature of my bronchiectasis) and which might have relevance to others with the condition. My chest specialist advised that I should not eat or drink for 4 hours before I go to sleep, and that I should use a bed wedge to elevate my upper body during sleep (just raising your head using pillows isn't sufficient). This has had a dramatic impact as most of my day time 'dry' cough has since ceased. I still have bronchiectasis, which will make me vulnerable to chest infections and the coughing that accompanies this, but the dry cough that plagued my days has now been eradicated as a result of my addressing the acid reflux issue. Thought I'd share this in case it might be of benefit to others who, possibly, might also find that they have this condition which aggravates existing bronchiectasis symptoms.

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  • Posted

    Thanks Sally, that's useful information and glad you've found a solution for your dry cough.

    I'm sometimes have a dry cough too but seems to be ad hoc. My consultant thought I might have acid reflux too but meds didn't help. I've recently started taking a daily antihistamine again and that seems to have helped with my breathing too.

    Keep well,

    Janet

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  • Posted

    My pulmonologist & his nurse try to get all the BXers to go for an endoscopy. There is an additional problem that can happen if someone has a hiatal hernia. I don't have the name of the problem in front of me but it's a minor surgical repair and suddenly ALL BX symptoms disappear. Can't tell you how much i hoped that there would be that change in my hiatal hernia when i had the latest endoscopy, but no such luck.

    I do hope everyone has a proper endoscopy before embarking on daily meds such as nexium, prilosec, omeprazole, pantoprazole, etc. Many are now OTC in the States, but they are still serious stuff and can damage kidneys, and cause migraines and other problems.

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    • Posted

      My hiatal hernia (stomach pushing into chest cavity - in my case, only slightly) was diagnosed after I had a CAT scan. I've never had an endoscopy. The respiratory specialist said that I wouldn't need meds for the acid reflux if I made the changes he listed (the 4 hours of not eating/drinking before sleep, raising upper body for sleep, losing a bit of weight) and he seems to have been proved correct, at least in my case.

      The 'minor surgical repair' you mention sounds interesting and, whether it would be necessary in my case or not, that's something to look in to. Your comments on the anti acid reflux drugs are also interesting.

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    • Posted

      CT scan works for me! Yes, i'm all for making the changes. To get off the daily reflux meds 20 yrs ago, i gave up daily coffee, all real tea (iced tea here in the South), most wheat bread (&now even whole rye flour-rye bread ), and eating late. There were a few other changes also. Can't raise the head of my bed as it's an air mattress (no dust/mite buildup), but if things are bad either lung or stomach-wise, i sleep in the recliner. I also keep basil & parsley growing year-round as munching on either of them or drinking basil tea can cure heartburn.

      My hiatal hernia is still small, also, so no surgery. I'm glad about the no surgery as i don't want to find out what adhesions in that region feel like, lol.

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  • Posted

    Hi Sally , I have Bronchiectasis and just diagnosed with eosinophilic asthma. I am taking the new injections for the asthma which I never suspected I had and almost all symptoms of both conditions are under control. You need to check with your doctor and ask for a blood test for the asthma.

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    • Posted

      Hi Carol

      Thanks - that's interesting. I've now googled 'eosinophilic asthma' and will bring this up with my respiratory specialist. I'd no idea what an umbrella term 'asthma' actually is.

      Great that symptoms of both your conditions are now under control.

      Sally

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  • Posted

    Hi Sally & Carol,

    I too was interested to read about eosinophilic asthma, I had to google it too.

    I've been referred to the Royal Brompton to the Difficult Asthma clinic. My respiratory consultant spoke to me about IgE treatment for asthma that's not well controlled. I've had a bad reaction now with high doses of steroids so she's hopeful the Brompton can help me.

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