Bungalow or not Bungalow?

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Whoever invented 13steps upto the bedroom was not a ME/CFS sufferer!  Almost every night (and several times during the day) I pull / crawl my way up those 13steps and say "I want to live in a bungalow".

Although I've had ME for along time it's only the last year that it's become almost every day that I feel like this.  Has anybody been to this level of coping with stairs and either stuck with a house or moved into a bungalow.  Was it a good thing to do in the long term? (lolI typed long run and had to change it to long term - using the word 'run' just didn't seem right - but made me smile).

Julie

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9 Replies

  • Posted

    Hi Julie

    I have had to live on single level accommodation since 2004.

    It was, and still is, the only way I can manage the severe symptoms.

    Climbing stairs is not an option for me...too dangerous on many levels!!

    The psychological aspect of not being able to reach all areas of my home

    was a big struggle for me and added to the stress of everyday living!cry

    So bungalows or single level accommodation with lifts is a definite

    advantage and saves you so much physical and mental energy!

    If you have the opportunity to move I would take it without question!smile

     

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    • Posted

      Thank  you for your advice.  My hubby hates bungalows so it's not an easy decision.  It would be easier to move around on one floor but do the stairs make me push myself more?  Getting no exercise at the moment is it better to keep the stairs as exercise? I'm not dangerous using stairs yet it's just hard work at times.
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    • Posted

      Hi Julie

      It's only my opinion, as you know everyone is different!

      For the level of disability I have(which is severe ME/CFS)

      stairs are my biggest problem!  The energy expended in using 

      them causes me a great deal of physical stress, so I do not

      use at all, but that's just me!

      As you have posted the question, I would imagine that this is

      more of a worry to you than you realise?!

      Pushing yourself with ME/CFS just worsens symptoms over time

      as I found to my cost because it took years to get a diagnosis!

      You could look at the option of a stairlift if your husband won't budge?!smile

       

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    • Posted

      Gosh a stair lifteek. I don't know why but somethings have been harder emotionally for me than others. I found starting to use my mobility scooter easier than emotionally using sticks (no figures). Now the thought of a stair lift makes me suddenly feel really old (I'm 36). 

      It's not that he would be totally against a bungalow as long as I can design it really well - no pressure (I'm an architect).  Part of his problem is emotionally letting go of properties he has lived on worked on (we doubled the size of our current home - most of the work has been done by the two of us) those were the days when ME didn't have such a grip on me.

      I'm moderate / severe ME (depends which day & what time you ask me).  I know I can convince him to move if I can find the best plot ever and design us the best ever property. He likes maybe the idea of the kids be upstairs and us down. I will also have to include part of the home for my mother-in-law and she needs ground floor only. 

      It does play on my mind alot.  I don't want to push for something which physically will make me worse (stairs or no stairs?).

      Thank you for your reply

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  • Posted

    Hi Julie,

    I don't know where you live (not even which country) but I would definitely suggest moving to a condo (if you want to buy) or an apartment (if you rent).  They are a lot safer,  assuming it woud be a building with elevators, because there are no stairs to climb and they are built according to more stringent codes. 

    If what you mean by "bungalow" is a small wooden building built up about 4 foot off the ground, then you have the problem of stairs to get in and out and you have the danger of fire.  In an apartment building or condominium it is easier to get help if you need it. You don't have to wrangle groceries up a flight of stairs, you can just put it all in a shopping cart or a little red wagon and pull it behind you.

    If there is a problem there is generally a manager on site, sometimes a maintenance man too.  If your pipes burst and water is flooding, call the manager. If someone breaks into your home scream and your neighbors will hear you.

    You lose a certain amount of privacy but you gain security.

    Good luck,

    Sunny

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    • Posted

      Hi Sunny, I'm in Norfolk in England (by your comments I'm guessing you are in the US?)

      Here in England our bungalows are mostly brick and on the ground. They are single storey so none of those lovely 13stepslol.x

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    • Posted

      I guess you mean something very different by "bungalow".  The name comes from India and means "Bengali House."  It was originally a single story wooden house with a wide veranda in front.  It was high off the ground for protection from floods and to let air circulate beneath.  That is how bungalows are still built in California and Hawaii.  

      I guess the English took the name and applied it to something else. What you are describing sounds to me like just a plain old brick house.  If it is all on one level we would call it a ranch-style.

      Wasn't it Winston Churchill who said that Britain and the US were two nations divided by a common language?

      Since you are an architect you could think of this as a challenge, a chance to create a house that will be AWESOME.

      Good luck,

      Sunny

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  • Posted

    Yes! We do call it a ranch here in America as I was reading the comments I got confused lol because I was sure a ranch was just one story and a bungalow had alot of stairs. Then i found out you live in England and we have two different meanings for bungalow. But yes! You should design a lovely ranch with a bunch of square footage to move around. It looks sort of majestic having a big beautiful house on the same level.
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    • Posted

      When sitting at home typing questions I forget I could be talking to someone on the other side of the world.  Didn't even think does bungalow mean something else to other countries. Think I'll try this discusion again worded differentlywinkx
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