11 Replies

  • Posted

    mine was 70 doc says bit high ,so 338 seems high 
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    • Posted

      I had over 1400 on one of my tests, yet I felt fine, to me that seems very strange!

      I'd heard that one of the medications I take that is supposed to ease my symptoms can actually cause stomach irritation, when I mentioned this to my doctor he said 'oh, yes, so it does'!!!!

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  • Posted

    It show inflammation somewhere, but it’s not massively high.

    Ask to have it repeated to see if it has risen or fallen

    Do you take any medications? Some rise the level

    As do other non Ibd conditions

    I hope you start to feel better or get further soon xxxxx

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  • Posted

    Not necessarily Chantal. Could be other parts that are inflamed. It needs a colonoscopy or similar and biopsies to be absolutely sure as I understand it.

    Of course as others have mentioned you can have a serious flare up (IBD) and the calco level is not raised and vice versa.

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  • Posted

    Raised Faecal Calprotectin levels are an indication of inflammation anywhere along the gastrointestinal tract. The gastrointestinal tract is defined as being the passage that foods takes to be digested, which is anywhere from the mouth to the anus.

    Raised levels do not necessarily mean you have an IBD such as Crohn's Disease or Ulcerative Colitis, it can be caused by stomach ulcers, gastritis, mouth ulcers / abcesses, certain medications, gastroenteritis (stomach bug) and sore throat to name a few.

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  • Posted

    I also have anemia now ,mouth sores, fecal impaction and proctitis. Unbearable stabbing pain near appendix that’s clear of appendix and ovaries sad 
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  • Posted

    Worth knowing that NSAID drugs (such as ibuprofen) can cause raised calpro' levels.

    Anything under 50 is considered normal. So 300+ indicates an infection, bad result from use of NSAIDs, or inflammation resulting from IBD - Crohn's or a form of Colitis.

    Unfortunately many people find themselves in a situation where they suspect there's something more going on than IBS but it can take persistence for diagnosis or if IBD symptoms may worsen to point that it's easier to diagnose. I suspect the introduction of Calpro testing in recent years means more people see raised inflammation from testing but without a smoking gun such as IBD - but that's not to say they don't have IBD. Sounds like your consultant is doing the right things. A follow-up calpro test wouldn't be a bad idea to rule out a bad result or perhaps an infection that's passed.

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