Can anyone interpret these for me please

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Hi, just looked at my results on my GP website. Can anyone help me interpret these levels. I feel so poorly but cannot get treatment. I have most of the hypo symptoms, and family history of hypo. At my wits end sad

Pathology Investigations

Serum TSH level 1.3 mu/L [0.2 - 4.0]

Serum free T4 level 15.1 pmol/L [11.0 - 22.6]

Serum free triiodothyronine level 4.0 pmol/L [3.5 - 6.5]

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11 Replies

  • Posted

    Your levels actually look amazing...  I would suggest to get your Vitamin D tested, as it causes all the same symptoms as hypothyroidism and is very common these days.  So, I would start there.  If that's in normal range, I'm not sure where to go next, as there are many conditions that can cause the same symptoms as hypothyroidism.. 

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    • Posted

      Oh.. I would also like to mention, that you can always get your levels retested in another 4 to 6 months, just to keep an eye on them.  Just because they are normal at this time, does not mean they will be normal in several months from now, that is, if you would indeed have hypothyroidism.  
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    • Posted

      Thanks for your reply. I am wondering if my very long term use of the contraceptive pill and also MSM is affecting my results. I have many symptoms (always freezing cold, very slow heart rate, dry hair/skin/nails, terrible fatigue...the list goes on and on. I have been taking vitamin D also, so don't think it is that...

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    • Posted

      Maybe.. I know that the supplement Biotin, used for skin and hair, can cause a false normal TSH..  So, yes, I would say it's definitely possible..

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    • Posted

      Oh holy crap, Melissa. I was getting B12 shots  when I was getting diagnosed- the second go round. I wonder if that hid some of the stuff. 

      The first time around, my TSH never showed elevated (2.5) , and I wasn’t getting B12 shots back then. But then again, I only had it tested twice. 

      The second time I think the highest it spiked was around 2. 

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  • Posted

    Hi Frances, well, your TSH looks good. This tells you what your pituitary gland thinks is happening. Pituitary produces TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone) based on signals from the body. Depending on how advanced thyroid disease is, this pituitary response may or may not be in accordance to what’s going on in the body. Once disease advances, the pituitary can give up and go back to normal TSH production. 

    Both your T3 and T4 levels are well below the midpoint of the ranges, probably the bottom fourth. 

    Have you had a thyroid ultrasound to look for cysts? Also, you may want to have a blood test for rT3, as well as thyroid antibodies. If these show positive or high, it could help explain things and could result in a diagnosis. 

    So here are the struggles with thyroid disease, summarized.

    1. Get a diagnosis.

    2. Get medication... that works. This can literally take years.

    3. Thyroid medication only treats hypothyroid, and sometimes can take the stress off the body enough to reduce cyst growth and size. Other than that, the disease continues to progress. 

    4. Years of taking bloodwork every 3-6 months, regular doctor visits,  a lifetime of prescription medication. Plus likely autoimmune disease, bone loss, food allergies or other related conditions. 

    I outline this progression for you so that you understand how important it is to eliminate other possibilities.  For example, magnesium deficiency symptoms are very similar to hypothyroid symptoms, as are many other deficiencies. Diabetes symptoms overlap with thyroid symptoms.  

    Exposure to chemicals and radiation, particularly bromine and mercury can induce hypothyroidism, as can neck injuries. 

    While you go through the hoops and waiting trying to get a medical diagnosus, you’ll do yourself a favor by starting to eliminate deficiencies, clean up your diet and remove toxins. It can’t hurt anything, it gives you a way to take control of your health, and you may start feeling better on your own. 

    Do some research on thyroid disease and treatment and read as much as you can.

    Good luck. 

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  • Posted

    Hi

    Can you explain what you meant when you said this

    "Both your T3 and T4 levels are well below the midpoint of the ranges, probably the bottom

    fourth"

    Thanks 

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    • Posted

      Hi Frances, sure.

      Your numbers are;

      Pathology Investigation

      Serum TSH level 1.3 mu/L [0.2 - 4.0]

      Serum free T4 level 15.1 pmol/L [11.0 - 22.6]

      Your T4 is 15.1, the range is roughly 11-23. Midpoint of the range is found by (23-11)/2 = 12/2=6 ... 23-6=17. So 17 is your midpoint.  For quarter points divide the 6 again by 2, which is 3. So the lower quarter of in range is 11+3, which is 14. You’re at 15, which is just above the lower quarter of the range.

      Your numbers for T3:

      Serum free triiodothyronine level 4.0 pmol/L [3.5 - 6.5]

      Your T3 is 4.0, range is 3, half range is 1.5, quarter range is 0.75. Using the same calculation method as I showed for T4.  

      Your T3 is 4.0, and us only 0.5 above the bottom end of the range.  A quarter of the ran range is 0.75, so you’re in the lower quarter of the acceptable range.

      Honey, get yourself some essential amino acid supplements and see if that alleviates sone of your symptoms.   It’ll take she months getting a proper diagnosis paid and thyroid rearming, and since your TSH isn’t elevated and treatment dosing is based on elevated TSH, it is very likely that traditional thyroid replacement therapy may not be successful for you.

      I understand having thyroid disease in your family. But even then, for thyroid disease to be triggered, there IS a trigger, usually chemical (most often mercury, bromine or radioisotopes), that for you,  results in a much more severe hypothyroid response because of the predisposition. It is possible to reverse the trigger, calm the immune system, which can improve thyroid health since thyroid disease is autoimmune.

      Ok, I know this is a ton to absorb. Do the best you can. Keep looking for answers and asking questions.

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    • Posted

      Sorry, there’s a few weird autocorrects. For some reason this page sometimes has a funky delay that results in some raally strange typos.
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  • Posted

    Did you stave off your T4 for 24 hours before the test and fast over night? Also have the test done first thing in the morning? As TSH is affected by not doing these things. 
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