Can BV and Trichonomiasis be misdiagnosed for each other?

Posted , 5 users are following.

Here in Ontario, I went for my second visit to the doctor. She told me that Trich is hard to test for - the sample needs to have a temperature control AND be read by a lab in under an hour from taking it.

Given its SO common (according to the internet) AND can lead to pelvic imflammatory (and infertility) AND seems to have similar symptoms to BV.....I can't help but wonder. If no Ontario doctors are EFFECTIVELY able to test for it.....

Now if I finally go and take the Flagystatin - which may mess up my ecology even more - its the same thing used for Trich. Am I right?

Any info out there?

Thank you!

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10 Replies

  • Posted

    The rest of the story is she tested for it round one - but told me how ineffective the test results are. She did not retest. 
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  • Posted

    Hi jess 

    if you take an antibiotic, also take probiotics aswell, and keep doing so..

    like acidophulis orally..

     i had vaginal clindamycin ovules for BV ( by Gyno) he said to follow by using thrush treatment as this often occurs after antibiotic use as all the good bacteria killed too.

    i had success with clindamycin vaginal ovules  ( 3 nights ) then 3 nights of Laurimic Ovules .. For thrush .... 

    repeated again one month later .. And all was cleared .. I check the vaginal PH regulary with home testers and been clear now for months ..

    good luck jess 

    jay x

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  • Posted

    Uesful info about 

    What is Trichomoniasis?

    Trichomoniasis, (also called "trich") is a common sexually transmitted disease (STD) that affects both men and women. Trichomoniasis is caused by a protozoan parasite called Trichomonas vaginalis and is a cause of vaginal infections in women and urethral infections in men. Trichomoniasis is an STD that affects approximately 5 million people in the US every year. Trichomoniasis is one of the most common, curable causes of vaginal infections in women.

    How is Trichomoniasis contracted?

    Trichomoniasis is spread through sexual contact, as all other STD's. Transmission can occur even if a person does not have symptoms of infection. Women contract trichomoniasis from infected male or female partners while men usually contract it only from female partners. Using condoms and/or dental dams provide some protection. Their use is strongly encouraged, but is not 100% safe. Trichomoniasis can also survive on infected objects like sheets, towels, and underwear and could be transmitted by sharing them.

    Trichomoniasis Incubation Period

    If symptoms appear, it usually takes from 3 to 28 days for them to develop.

    Trichomoniasis Symptoms

    Many people with trichomoniasis experience no symptoms. If there are symptoms, the most common trichomoniasis symptoms include:

    Trichomoniasis Symptoms in Women

    Genital itching and/or burning

    Vaginal or vulval redness

    Frothy yellow-green vaginal discharge with a strong odor

    Blood spotting

    Frequent and/or painful urination

    Discomfort during intercourse

    Abdominal pain

    A woman might also find that the above symptoms worsen after menstruation and that the symptoms may be confused with an yeast infection. This fact emphasizes the importance of always having an yeast infection diagnosed properly, because it might not be an yeast infection.

    Trichomoniasis Symptoms in Men

    Men are usually asymptomatic, but if a man has symptoms, they can include:

    Unusual penile discharge

    Painful urination

    Burning sensation after ejaculation

    Tingling inside the penis.

    Testing

    A medical provider will take a swab of fluid from a male's urethra or from a female's vagina and will examine it under a microscope to see if trichomoniasis is present.

    Treatment

    Antibiotics - Metronidazole 500mg 2-3 times a day for 7-10 days. It is especially important that both partners are treated at the same time because an infected man, even a man who has never had symptoms or whose symptoms have stopped, can continue to infect a female partner until he has been treated. Anyone being treated for trichomoniasis should avoid sex until they and their sex partners have completed the treatment.

    If you are not treated

    As mentioned above, trichomoniasis is one of the most common and most curable STD's. The symptoms are more annoying than they are threatening to your health. The genital inflammation caused by trichomoniasis might however, increase a person's risk of acquiring HIV infection if s/he is exposed to HIV or might also increase the chances of transmitting HIV infection to a sex partner. In rare case, trichomoniasis in pregnant women may cause a premature rupture of the membranes and early delivery.

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    • Posted

      Thank you - I have already reviewed the profiles in depth. In some parts of the world (Asia) it reads that Trich is more popular than Chlamydia (I don't believe that's the case in N America). 

      I don't mean to alarm anyone - trich and bv have similar profiles - I have felt similar symptoms for both with exception of a frothy green discharge. I understand that one might not experience all symptoms anyways.

      My wonderment is surrounding if Trich can create an imbalance in the Ph (so also doubly resulting in 'BV'   )  and because of the shortfall in our testing here in Canada - are we calling it BV?

      Next to this - it seems the Flagy under its proper name Metronidazole IS the treatment for Trich anyways - so even if I had it - I am wiping it out with this treatment.

      Now here's the next considerations. GETTING MY PARTNER TREATED. If I have a point ^^^ with the short fall in testing. His doctor will surely say he can't treat him for BV, but he could treat him for Trich, though his doctor may consider that a 60% odds of accuracy is a test is sufficient - where my doctor disagrees and is honest. 

      My boyfriend is asymptomatic - but prior to myself (and god only knows now) has had a very very active sex life with many partners. 

      My approach is that he gets treated, end of story. If he doesn't - end of our story.  

      I feel like we're all playing a game of Clue. Such a madd investigation.

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  • Posted

    I HAVE NEVER HEARD OF THIS OTHER THING THAT YOU ARE TALKIN ABOUT THAT Trichonomiasis BUT DO YOU KNOW ANYTHING ABOUT IT THAT MAKES THEM DIF. BUT SO MUCH ALIKE?
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    • Posted

      I don't mean to alarm anyone - trich and bv have similar profiles - I have felt similar symptoms for both with exception of a frtohy green discharge. I understand that one might not experience all symptoms anyways.

      My wonderment is surrounding if Trich can create an imbalance in the Ph (so also doubly resulting in 'BV') and because of the shortfall in our testing here in Canada - are we calling it BV?

      Next to this - it seems the Flagy under its proper name Metronidazole IS the treatment for Trich anyways - so even if I had it - I am wiping it out with this treatment.

      Now here's the next considerations. GETTING MY PARTNER TREATED. If I have a point ^^^ with the short fall in testing. His doctor will surely say he can't treat him for BV, but he could treat him for Trich, though his doctor may consider that a 60% odds of accuracy is a test is sufficient - where my doctor disagrees and is honest. 

      My boyfriend is asymptomatic - but prior to myself (and god only knows) has had a very very active sex life. 

      My approach is that he gets treated, end of story. If he doesn't - end of our story.  

      I feel like we're all playing a game of Clue. Such a madd investigation. 

       

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    • Posted

      Hi jess 

      there are clinics, and they are confidential, sexual health or GUM clinics, they check you and do all the tests there and then..

      your Doc sounds like he / she cant be bothered with what you have said .

      if its playing on your mind, try the specialist clinics and then you can relax 😊

      jay x

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    • Posted

      Yes, I feel that my doctor and I met when she worked in a university clinic. Shes open enough - but we only ever see each other for concerns of this nature. She is a general practitioner who seems not to have much of a focus on any subject in particular. I need to meet with someone who specializes in sexual health. 

      Many thanks again, Jess

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