Can Pernicious Anaemia be hereditary?

Posted , 7 users are following.

This discussion has been locked due to a period of inactivity. Start a new discussion

Hi, Can anyone tell me if Pernicious Anaemia is hereditary? My mum was diagnosed with it in her 70s. Thank You.

2 likes, 13 replies

Report

13 Replies

  • Posted

    Yes, it can be hereditary. Worth getting your blood tested if you think there's a possibility you could have a problem.

    Report
  • Posted

    Hi, I think it can be as my mother had it, I have it and my brother has it too.  I can't believe this is a coincidence.  Do you have any symptoms?  If so, get yourself checked out with your GP.

    Report
  • Posted

    HI Janie .. I'm Suzanne in the US, yes my endocrologist has confirmed it, but being the one of the only two left in my family ,when I was diagnosed all close relatives had passed. Early on in my treatment I was referred to UCLA a specialist there said that certain regions in the world have high PA. All my ancestors are from northern and Western European. My grandfather was born in Cornwall England and my grand mother born in France. My sister and I are the only one to carry on for my Dads side  of the family. My Mothers father was also born in France. So the Drs. at UCLA concluded my genealogy is what predicted this for me. Have you also been told the higher risk of colon cancer this brings with it ? Best if luck , good health. Suzanne

    Report
    • Posted

      Hi Suzanne, I don't want to sound like a proper hypochondriac, as I have numerous health problems including diverticular bowel disease and of course that is a worry that it may in fact be Crohn's disease as my mum also had this, along with the Pernicious Anaemia. I'm having more blood tests in 2 weeks and will be mentioning the PA to the doctor on my next visit. I also have Osteoarthritis, which I've been told is hereditary (both my parents had it ) thank you for sharing your own experience .

      Report
    • Posted

      Hi Suzanne:  thank your for your post.  could you signpost to any research that concludes the Bowel Cancer connection with PA. I wasn't aware of this connection.

      with thanks

      C

      Report
    • Posted

      Hi Caitlin, the cancer link came from the specialists at UCLA and my gastrointrolgist, I have a colonoscopy every 5yrs. PA is a disease of the intentions. Without intrisnic factor in the colon leaves the lining subject to cancer. Try the Internet and research for more info. Drs. aren't always correct, sometimes it's empowing to have answers to things instead of believing everything from Drs. (like they are Gods) . I have in the 20 yrs. of PA had Drs tell me outrageous thing , like I'm an idiot. I hope this or any other info I could supply helps you. Suzanne

      Report
    • Posted

      Hi Janie, I understand what your saying about having other health problems, I too have other autoimmune diseases, for some unusual reason once you get one autoimmune disease, you get more. I have had to have my thyroid removed due to cancer, and I have addisions disease. So I completely understand. We can't let bad health win , so try to stay active, I walk 2-3 times a week,  best health to you . Suzanne

      Report
    • Posted

      Thanks Suzanne, yes that's helpful. it's also really interesting & when you point out the connection it makes sense. PA runs in my family as does Ca of the Stomach, but no Bowel Ca that we know of. i concur with your thoughts on the Medics. they have great difficulty with working in a collaborative way. when one asks for that approach, one's immediately titled with the label ''a difficult patient'', yet all the rhetoric proposes taking responsibility and patient empowerement. alack and alas we can rarely win with this outmoded approach. hope your PA is now under control & your feeling well.

      with thanks C

       

      Report
  • Posted

    You will need to have specific tests carried out by your doctor to confirm a diagnosis of Pernicious Anaemia and yes, as others have said it can be inherited.

    However there is life after P.A. as I've had it for 45 years and I'm still "clivealive" at 75.

    Report
    • Posted

      Better than I really have a right to expect at my age having had two thirds of my stomach removed (due to a perforated peptic ulcer) at the age of 17, lost all my teeth (due to acid erosion) at 24, diagnosed with P.A. (eventually) at 30, asbestos related disease (pleural plaques due to helping a neighbour build a garage when I was 14) at 65 and Type 2 diabetes at the age of 74.

      My first wife Valerie died in 1992 during open heart surgery aged 46 after 27 years of marriage but I wss blessed in meeting my now wife Gill over the checkout at my local supermarket and we have now been married for just over 20 years.

      Yes! life can be really hazardous at times but as Suzanne says "We can't let bad health win",

      I have messaged you a couple of times.

      I hope you are O.K.

      Report
    • Posted

      wow, you've beeen yhrough the mangel at a young age, but you're still on top. keep it that way.  yes, thank you I'm OK.

      C

      Report

Join this discussion or start a new one?

New discussion

Report as inappropriate

Thanks for your help!

We want the forums to be a useful resource for our users but it is important to remember that the forums are not moderated or reviewed by doctors and so you should not rely on opinions or advice given by other users in respect of any healthcare matters. Always speak to your doctor before acting and in cases of emergency seek appropriate medical assistance immediately. Use of the forums is subject to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy and steps will be taken to remove posts identified as being in breach of those terms.

newnav-down newnav-up