Can pneumonia cause copd

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I heard that pneumonia causes copd if not treated? 

Ive been told that if not cured, within a few days or weeks, pneumonia will turn into copd. Is this true? (P.s I don't have pneumonia, but wanna know) 

of so, what's the actual limit? How long till that person develops copd from pneumonia if not treated?

thanks, Rhys. 

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  • Posted

    Rhys, where are you getting all your info?
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    • Posted

      trust me I don't have pneumonia , - no symptoms. Just wondered. Cause if pneumonia fills the alveoli with fluid, like bronchitis does, that should damage the alveoli? And it causes the air sacks to swell with fluid. So that should do some damage also, if not treated correct? 
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  • Posted

    Rhys, I think that you'll find that it is the other way round - people with COPD tend to be prone to more frequent chest infections than normal folks and, if left untreated, the infected material can cause pneumonia.
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  • Posted

    Lung infections and pneumonia can cause lung damage if left untreated which could be the tipping point that may result in COPD or other lung problems for people who previously had no diagnosed lung or breathing problems.

    The time limit would be unknown as it would depend on the amount of diagnosed or undiagnosed lung damage the person already has.

    For anyone, untreated lung infections and pneumonia can lead to further complications and in some cases even death.

    If you know someone who suspects pneumonia or lung infection do urge them to seek professional medical help to avoid any complications.  The sooner its treated the more chance of a good recovery in a shorter timeframe than if left untreated which can as mentioned above could become a serious problem to health.

    People who are not diagnosed with COPD can and do get lung infections and pneumonia. People with COPD can be more susceptible to lung infections, lung infections if left untreated can lead to pneumonia, it the reason why people with COPD must get treatment for lung infections asap.  Life can be removed very quickly when complications set in.  Its just not worth the risk in delaying getting treatment.

     

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    • Posted

      Thanks. My grandma has had pneumonia a few times. (Just wanted to check) She smokes a lot. She used to smoke a pack a day. Now 10 smokes a day! She's been tested for copd, cancer, and, amazingly, she's not got any disease.she strted smoking at 13! She's now 74! 
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    • Posted

      I would say in your grandma's case she will need treatment asap, she is bound to have lung damage and the longer she goes without treatment the greater the risks to her.
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  • Posted

    Hello Rhys,

    You have a very good question!

    I have read and also heard, that either Tuberculosis or Pneumonia, could cause Pulmonary fibrosis. Pulmonary Fibrosis is under another category, but is a damaging lung disease. Pulmonary Fibrosis scars and thickens the tissue around and between the air sacs (alveoli) in the lungs. This makes it more difficult for oxygen to pass into the bloodstream, in order to give oxygen to the organs. The damage can be caused by many different things, including Tuberculosis or Pneumonia.

    But, I am not certain if pneumonia causes COPD, but it can cause acute respiratory failure, in COPD patients. That is one of the leading causes of concerns when a COPD patient develops pneumonia. This damage can include inflammation that further limits your airflow, and causes more irreversible damage to your lung tissue. Regarding COPD patient's, the most serious complication of pneumonia is, as stated earlier, respiratory failure.

    I hope this has helped! 

     

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    • Posted

      Hello again, 

      Just to note, that it is most important to get help asap for those who have pneumonia, due to possible scarring on lung tissues purpose. Also, if have copd, due to more damage acquired on lungs, on top of copd. The sooner the treatment the better! 

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  • Posted

    Hi Rhys,  I had pneumonia when i was 17 and spent 2weeks in hospital, it left a shadow on my left lung, docs told me then to stop smoking, that went on deaf

    ears, carried on smoking 20 sometimes 30 a day depending on stress levels.

    Twelve years ago i had legionaires disease, this affected my liver, kidney and the legionella covered nearly all my lungs, i was given 12 hours to live, but somehow recovered to doctors amazement.  Three months later had a scan and was

    diagnosed with copd.  5years ago i went to see a proffessor who told me both the pneumonia and legionaires disease had severley damaged my lungs aswell

    as the smoking, yes i was still smoking even though the outlook didnt look good

    at all, he told me i would be in a wheelchair within 4 years.  I have all the inhalers

    spirvia seretide and constantly having infections taking steroids antibiotics all the

    time and sputum constant all day long.  I have tried to stop smoking cant count how many times without success, but i need an operation soon so i stopped 3 weeks ago and am utterley suprised that i have managed it, for so long,

    I dont know when i got copd but feel it was after the legionaires as i am an avid

    dancer could dance all nite upto then,  I still force myself to dance, cant manage much but i will not this stop me.

    Hope this as answered your question

    caz x

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  • Posted

    Those with COPD are known to be at a higher risk of pneumonia and other respiratory infections. Pneumonia and COPD work as a sort of a vicious circle in that one can greatly impact the other, making symptoms more severe and dangerous for the patient. COPD and pneumonia are known risk factors for respiratory failure so when you combine the two it is especially serious
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