Cardio problems because of CKD

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I came across a couple of articles on the internet.  they discussed that the leading cause of death for people with CKD and of those on dialysis is caused by Cardio problems, rather than actual total kidney failure.   Perhaps this is well known to everyone but it was news to me.  However neither article discussed why this was.  Why CKD causes cardio problems and the majority of deaths because of it,

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  • Posted

    Hello Rick,

    This is often caused through the potassium getting too high and it can cause a heart attack.

    Mine has gone too high before (6,8) and I had to spend a night in hospital.

    Hope that helps somewhat 

    Regards 

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    • Posted

      Thanks Runedog.  I just found this "interesting".  And to read that not just SOME deaths of CKD patients occur due to cardio, but that the MAJORITY do.

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    • Posted

      Sorry, my finger slipped!  I wanted to ask if you know how high the potassium can go before you are at risk?
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    • Posted

      MrsO, I struggle with elevated potassium. My nephrologist doesn't get too alarmed until it elevates to 6.0 or higher.

      Fortunately, my treatment plan has been keeping it well in check for me. I eat a low potassium diet (2000 mg potassium daily) and I take a potassium binder daily. Now my potassium typically comes in at 4.1-4.2, well within the normal range.

      Marj

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    • Posted

      Morning,

      Marg is correct, potassium that reaches over 6 is considered dangerous ; mine has reached 6.8 and I was rushed into hospital and placed on a drip but I felt fine. Stupid thing was, when I came out of hospital I was ill for several days due to the patients I shared the ward with who were constantly coughing and sputtering. What a life aye 😜😜😜

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    • Posted

      Thank you, Runedog.  My potassium has recently been slightly raised but a renal consultant told me last week that he isn’t worried about it.  I take Losartan Potassium,as ARB and this clsss of drugs is said to possibly raise potassium levels.  It has also increased my creatinine levels but, again, Dr is’t concerned although does monitor it.  I’m due to have another blood test in the next day or two to check my kidney function following 10 days on Hydralazine so will ask what the present potassium level is.
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    • Posted

      MrsO,

      This stuff definitely gets rather complicated doesn't it? I know there are several BP medications that can elevate potassium levels. So it's just a constant juggling situation.

      Marj

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    • Posted

      Marj, “complicated” and some! I just wish more doctors realised that we don’t all fit into one category - we don’t all follow the rule book - their rule book!
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    • Posted

      MrsO,

      That is certainly the truth. In fact, I suspicion that very few of us actually follow the rule book. Normal is defined statistically. I know that in my field of special education no child first the criterion entirely so there really is no such thing as a totally normal onset of a disability like autism. I'm sure it's the same for medical issues. Consequently the diagnostic skills of the doctors are critical and they really need to consider us as important parts of the medical team; they need our feedback and input!

      Marj

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    • Posted

      If like the ones, who listen and are prepared to work with us rather than against us.  Sadly, there are a few who feel quite  affronted if it seems we might know what we are talking about!  It’s only our body after all!🙄

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    • Posted

      Yes, I just got home from my regular 3 month A1C check up with my primary care physician. She definitely does listen and works with her patients. Another great set of labs with my A1C!! It came in at 5.0. This is without medication. Frankly, my type 2 diabetic condition has been quite easy to control for me. So that's been a silver lining to my medical challenges🐶

      The other good news was my blood pressure. It's running very close to the normal range now; it's not running so low any more. Clearly I'm feeling much better with my BP not running so low. 

      Just such a difference to work with a doctor and one who actually listens🐶

      Marj

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    • Posted

      Great news on all fronts for you, marj - well done! 🙏🏼 We have opposite problems with our blood pressure - your’s having been too low whilst mine is so very high.  No wonder we confuse the doctors!  Stay well, marj.

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  • Posted

    Due to high blood pressure. Google heart failure and CKD. My dad had SEVERAL during stage 4 and stage 5 CKD, the last one took him. That is why I already have made arrangements for my 13 year old should I depart without notice. I've made funeral arrangements as well as other loose ends I needed to tie up and deal with, no sense in leaving so much to deal with for my sons. Yes, heart failure with or without dialysis. I have spoken with my kids, they know I could exit ANY day. We know it and enjoy any time we have together and when we say our good byes or good nights, we know that could be the last time. Knowledge about our diseases is very important, not only how to best deal with them but how to prepare for what is inevitable. Every one will die someday, my mom, siblings, husband, and kids. How we LIVE is what matters, making awesome memories for those we leave behind and our quality of life while we are here.   Ever wonder how dialysis center chairs get empty and available for a new patient? There is a lot to CKD.  

    For anyone interested:

    Hundreds of Interlaced Fingers by Vanessa Grubbs, MD.  A Kidney doctors search for a perfect match. Author is aNephrologist who donated a kidney to her now husband and then went from being a Dr to a Nephrologists.

    Being Mortal by Atul Gawande. Medicine and what matters in the end. Author is a surgeon and professor at Harvard medical school, etc., etc., etc. Just don't have the time to give list all his awards, etc. (All of this typing is killing my hands as it is)

    AWESOME books!! I would also suggest medical papers as opposed to "articles". And medical "studies".

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    • Posted

      Fran,

      Thanks for making this post! I, too, have been very focused on "preparing for death" while trying to enjoy the things I can still do. Most of my friends are unable to understand why I'm so driven to do this. But it's exactly as you say; I could pass away at any moment in time OR I could experience a debilitating, but not fatal, cardiac event. The later would likely force me to stop working. I need to be as prepared as possible for either situation while doing my best to enjoy what I can still do right now.

      My father had chronic kidney disease for over 40 years. His was hypertension related. He was ultimately placed on in-home hemodialysis. But he didn't pass away from CKD. And although he had three relatively minor heart attacks, he didn't pass away from a major cardiac event. Instead, his heart just stopped beating one day. His nephrologist said that that is fairly common for persons receiving dialysis because dialysis is such a strain on the heart.

      Anyway, from attending most of my dad's nephrologist appointments, I have known that most people with CKD do not die from CKD. Most die from cardiac problems. And some die from serious illnesses like pneumonia.

      Growing up with a father with CKD, I was always aware of the fact that he could pass away suddenly. We, as a family, really enjoyed the time we had--lots of good memories. And what a precious gift; my father taught me how to live well with serious chronic conditions. It would be impossible for me to overstate how much I think about him and the way he lived his life. I'm sure your children will have similar wonderful memories from their childhood with you.

      Marj

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