Convalescence following TAR surgery

Posted , 6 users are following.

I' m due for ankle replacement surgery in a month or so, and trying to set up some affordable care for myself in the weeks that follow, as I live alone and am elderly. Researching this, prices quoted are enormous! What do I actually need in those few weeks? What did you find essential? I'd love to hear from people who've gone through this and emerged sane and not skint! 70+ slim and healthy otherwise. Have family, but busy people!

0 likes, 9 replies

Report

9 Replies

  • Posted

    It’s 6 weeks since I had my replacement. The first two weeks I was in a cast and was non weight barring. Therefore I feel you need quite a lot of help as even if I managed to make a cup of tea I couldn’t carry it anywhere. I was fine showering I had bought a stool for the shower before hand. You just need to make sure everything you need is to hand.

    After the two weeks I was in an aircast boot and could then weight bare so it was easier to manage. I’ve just had my boot removed and honestly need help again. I’m lucky I have my husband but I’m just trying to give you an idea of how it’s been for me. 

    Report Reply
    • Posted

      Dear Louise

      Having had two ankle surgeries one a primary and because it was badly done had it replaced several years later and my experience was that non weight bearing for a minimum of six weeks.

      Cheers Richard

      Report Reply
    • Posted

      Thanks, Louise. Sadly I no longer have a husband as he died five years ago, so I'm coping with this alone. How did you cope psychologically, with all the immobility? Trying to get an idea of what might be absolutely essential. Professional care is expensive. Considered two weeks in a care home - again, expensive. Prefer to sleep upstairs - could you do stairs on your bum or on crutches? It would be interesting to know how bad your condition was when you opted for surgery. Mine's pretty awful at present.

      Report Reply
    • Posted

      I know I’m lucky to have my husband.

      You really will need to ask for help because if you don’t get the odd trip out even if it’s just for coffee or lunch personally I think you will get really down. My husband has taken me out for short jaunts I’ve had friends & neighbours visit but I’ve still had times when I’ve felt s bit down.

      Yesterday was all good at the hospital and I was on a high last night but today the reality has sunk in and I know I’m in for a bit of a hard slog learning to walk again. Hopefully for you and I and the rest of the people on here it will be worth it in the end.

      I wish you well.

      Report Reply
  • Posted

    Dear Literate

    Without more knowledge of you I cannot advice but when I had my first total ankle replacement at age 72 I was very fit, not over weight and very positive with a good sense of balance.

    I looked after myself and my dogs at home on my crutches and my bum ! If the hospital had known they would not have let me out! It was very hard as I lived in a house with many levels but I managed,without any help.

    I would invest in a female urinal to reduce the need for toilet trips, have a method for transporting food and drinks and consider having water and kettles in several places. Have a cordless phone available and a mobile. Remove all rugs, have a good supply of books, computer and TV and plan on taking things easy for several weeks.

    I had sheep to look after in the snow so I had made it really tough for myself.

    Well that's it but ask me any questions you want. Cheers Richard

    Report Reply
  • Posted

    I also live alone and have no family nearby. My surgeon insisted that someone be with me for the first 24 hours. That was definitely a necessity. After that I continued to have a home health care aide about 3 times a week for 4 hours at a time. That was enough time for her to clean up and be on standby when I'm in the shower and take me to appointments. I couldn't have done it without her. I tried it on my own for a week. I couldn't get the trash out or do much cooking for myself. Taking a shower was frightening because of the fear of falling. 

    The most difficult thing is all the time alone and I'm normally contented living alone. I'm now 6 weeks post-op and am finding it more and more difficult. So try and talk to friends, contact your local senior center or church and see if they can arrange for people to visit. I also bought an inexpensive wheel chair so friends can take me out. 

    It has been one of the hardest things I've ever done.

    Report Reply
    • Posted

      It does seem to be harder than you expect. I’ve had 5 other operations on my ankle so I sort of know what to expect and knew it would be hard. But the reality is harder. 

      I’m six weeks post op and was so happy yesterday when he said I only have to wear my boot in public places . But the reality of wearing my trainers today has been very sore and uncomfortable. The next few weeks I think will be s hard slog. 

      Good luck 

      Report Reply
  • Posted

    Hey Literate. Sorry you are going through your replacement I know the aggravation and worrying about other things but who's going to take care of you. You said your family is kind of busy! But if you have Medicare or some kind of insurance you could get home care to help you out!! Go to the internet and and do a little research about home care and what can you do but pick wisely!! When I got hurt. My human resource department for my company got me and is called Family Medical Leave Act it's like a short-term disability and also. if one of your family members work for a company with 50 people and more that person can file for that and they would pay him or she to take care of you!! I hope that's a little helpful for you and you take care and take care of that ankle

    Report Reply
  • Posted

    Hi,

    I also live alone and had ankle fusion 6 weeks non weight bearing, I stayed in hospital for 1 week. I had a chair over the toilet, a shower stool and a wheelchair and crutches. I organised everything to bench level before I had the op so that I could zapp meals in the microwave and make a cuppa. I spent 2 weeks in bed after coming home, one because I was doped up on pain meds and the other it was summer and I had airconditioning in my bedroom. I am an avid reader so made sure I had lots of books to read, and my laptop by my side. Friends would come and visit and as I got better they would take me out for little jaunts which was a life saver. I also used Netflix and Stan and caught up on all the shows I hadn't seen. Got my grocery home delivered the guys were great and would put them on the kitchen bench for me. I was lucky and had a lady come once a week to change my sheets and do a quick clean up that only lasted 4 weeks. After that my friends helped. You will get through this.

    Report Reply

Join this discussion or start a new one?

New discussion Reply

Report as inappropriate

Thanks for your help!

We want the forums to be a useful resource for our users but it is important to remember that the forums are not moderated or reviewed by doctors and so you should not rely on opinions or advice given by other users in respect of any healthcare matters. Always speak to your doctor before acting and in cases of emergency seek appropriate medical assistance immediately. Use of the forums is subject to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy and steps will be taken to remove posts identified as being in breach of those terms.

newnav-down newnav-up