copd and heart spasm

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Earlier this year I was admitted to hospital with a coronary spasm. My doctor now thinks I have copd. Can these things be related

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  • Posted

    Hi panda, First Off I`m No Doctor. It`s Doubtful That Your Visit To Hospital Had Anything To Do With COPD. Normally You`re Sent For The Lung X-ray Then A Spirometry Test To Ascertain Whether You Have COPD. See Your Doctor Again And/Or Go For A 2nd Opinion.
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    • Posted

      Yes, go for a second opinion, and don't let them know what they said in ER regarding COPD. If they just went on a smoking history, and made your diagnosis, this is not only insensitive, but not good either. They could be correct, but always best to have a second opinion. This is another reason why I got lots of tests done. 
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  • Posted

    Doctors often do not fully explain what our problems are. Because THEY know what they are talking about, they assume everyone else does as well. But of course we don't.  Your coronary problems and COPD may or may not be related but I agree a 2nd opinion would be good. You need to have everything fully explained. Remember, things are often nowhere near as frightening as we fear they are. 
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  • Posted

    Thank you for your responses. I am going to the respiratory nurse tomorrow and hope to get more info from her.
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  • Posted

    Why does he think you have copd panda? Are you short of breath or coughing?
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    • Posted

      I am very breathless and cannot do every day things like making the bed. I also have a cough which has got worse. I am on an inhaler which helps a little. I am seeing respiratory nurse tomorrow and keeping my fingers crossed that it is not copd but my doctor thinks it is. Will let you know ow what happens after my tests.
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  • Posted

    I wouldn't think so, two different organs.   Why do you say "thinks"?  No tests yet to confirm or rule out COPD?
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  • Posted

     My very first visit to the ER, three years ago,  was due to my heart. I had a condition that developed over the last six months. I found I couldn't breath or walk very far, and suffered lots of lethargy,  as the date neared when the attack occured (on the day I went to ER). I had quit smoking 25 years earlier. But, when I was having Congestive Heart Failure (type of CHF: Takotsubo cardiomyopathy), in the ER, there was one pulmonologist along side my cardiologist, and he claimed that due to my smoking history and my 'tight' coughing sounds, I probably had COPD, and that probably was also causing the heart problem. I noticed my cardiologist stayed quiet.  

    The heart and lungs do work together..if the heart doesn't get the oxygen needed, then the lungs work harder to supply it, and if the lungs can't, then the heart breaks down over time, which can cause heart problems, but I have always heard they were 'right' or 'left' sided heart conditions only.

    After the ER visit, I was admitted to the hospital three different times (2 weeks stays each) during that fall. During the hospital stays, I had many heart tests and exams given. I was diagnosed with the CHF (Takotsubo cardiomyopathy), and this type of heart problem is due to stress or grief over a long period of time, and the good thing about it is it is reversible (unlike COPD). But, from what I learned, had nothing to do with COPD.

    When I could finally go to another Pulmonologist office and he prescribed many lung tests, and to my surprise, I did have COPD. At first the Pulmonologist said that he could not find anything wrong with my lungs, tissue wise. But, the PFT showed stage three Emphysema. The Cat Scan showed mild emphysema. At first he thought I had Asthma, until he saw the results of the PFT. So, I am guessing I don't have any damage yet, and hopefully never, but for some reason have much obstruction (for some reason). 

    The PFT test is one of the most poweful tests, and the cat scan can find basically anything on the lungs or lung tissue that are imperfect or damaged. It is amazing that I did have both, but two completely different conditions, non related, but sometimes I do wonder. I was so hoping the pulmonologist in the ER was wrong..lol. 

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    • Posted

      Brenda, I'm confused:  if you have third stage COPD then you do have lung damage.  And of course you're right that a lung condition can affect the yeart and vice versa.   I meant that it's possible for the two conditions to be totally unconnected, as in my case:  the COPD is from years of (stupidly) smoking which may also have affected my heart.   

      I'd never heard of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy before:  I've now googled it and realise that was probably what I experienced about 10 years ago when someone I knew died during the night and I discovered the body.  I had severe chest pain and dizziness which went away by itself, but recurred a couple of weeks later and I called an ambulance and was taken to hospital,  The usual blood test for a heart attack showed nothing and the doctors had no explanation.

      I  have since had a genuine heart attack due to a partilaly blocked artery for which a stent has been inserted, but I've also called an ambulance thinking I was having another one and it was in fact pneumonia due to COPD.

      I strongly suggest you find a lung rehab group for your COPD:  I've found it invaluable.

      All the best!

       

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    • Posted

      Thank you Jude, I was going to a rehab, but it took all day long, so I now own a stationary recumbent bike, and use it quite often and love it. Also, I have been wanting to go back to rehab, to be with other people that have lung conditions, and also for the technician, since they help so much. So, I may start back in rehab again, just have to get a prescription from my doctor.

      It does sound like you had Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy, especially due to the situation you were in regarding your friend. That is so shocking, and sorry to hear you had that happened.

      As I remember, regarding Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy, I remember feeling parts in my upper chest area, moving around, and then it went away when I went to bed minutes later. Some nights I felt intense burning sensations in my chest, like my chest on fire,  that would quickly subside when changing positions in bed while sleeping. I know now not to ignore them, but I've never had them sense.

      But, six months later, in which my health deteriorated, and began having SOB and not being able to walk far, I finally had a big attack..it was like hyperventilating and also having a extremely fast and hard pounding heart beat all at same time. My son called the paramedics...so glad he was there when it happened. I went unconscious for about 2 hours and woke up in ER hearing the doctors talking while watching me laying there. I also remember my vision being gone after becoming conscious..it was temporary. 

      My blood tests showed that I had a silent one (heart attack) in the past...that was scary. Sorry to hear that you had a genuine heart attack due to partially blocked artery...also pneumonia. 

       

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  • Posted

    Hi Panda,

    I am late jumping into your discussion and perhaps you know more about your condition by now. However, I wanted to share that recently I learned that my pulmonary condition, severe asthma and COPD, directly causes my heart rate to rise to dangerous levels. I am not sure that this relates to your heart spasm, but I was taken by surprise by the link.

    I bought a oxi-pulse monitor for my finger so I can monitor my heart rate so I can avoid heart attack and stroke range. I wore a heart monitor and was told that if one has to have a heart problem, this one, mine, is the best to have.

    While there is relief in that, there is also frustration, because just laying on the couch my heart rate has gone up to heart attack range. So, I plan to obtain a second opinion. Second opinions are valuable.

    My best to you!

    💛 Dawn, USA

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    • Posted

      Thank you for sharing that information DawnDeDee...my heart pulse can climb up to 120-130 beats per minute's (sometimes 140 bpm, use to, but not as much today), depending, upon walking. Originally, I had Congestive Heart Failure, but it is a rare, but a recessive type. I also have COPD, and we all know that one is progressive..lol.  

      In the past, my heart beat could become out of control after my CHF. My bpm's (beats per minutes) could climb very high...scary too. It would take a very long time for the bpm's to calm down. Also, oxygen was lower due to COPD (3rd stage), and I could not breathe either, until it was calmed down. So, I had to learn positions that allowed me to rest, in order to stay calm. 

      I have learned that whenever I have to walk, for example, in the kitchen (or anyplace), that there are ways to rest. For example, my bpm's climb as I walk, but once I start to become breathless, my heart rate is usually over 100 bpm (just beginning to climb). I will immediately acquire one of the resting positions, that I had learned while in re-hab.

      My most favorite position is by placing my elbows on the kitchen counter, and just lean into them and rest there. The surface has to be the height of a kitchen counter for this position. At first it was uncomfortable, but over time, now it is just like when I sit and rest, but done while standing.

      The other position, is leaning (either side) my shoulders against a flat surface while standing up. I usually find that my refrigerator is my resting spot, when a counter is not near by.

      I take rests periodically as I am standing up for long period's of time, or, when I am in my kitchen preparing the family dinner or washing dishes. Washing dishes is easy for me, since I can lean over the sink, while leaning on my elbows, and washing dishes. 

      I also wear a oximeter to measure my oxygen % level and also my heart rate, whenever I am active. When I am riding on my recumbent bike, there is a built in heart monitor in the handles that I hold onto, and I use it all the time. 

      This helps for me, and I am hoping it can help someone else too! 

      Brenda 

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    • Posted

      Forgot to add....my heart's beats per minute is a lot better now..it has been three years since my CHF, and it is a recessive type of CHF, but seems to be healing soooooo slow, but it is healing! Now, it seems to take much longer for my bpm's to go up in rate...I am guessing over time, it is like an athelete, after walking and walking, over and over, the heart has no choice but to reside back down to normal bpm's. At least it seems like this is why. Thank You!
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    • Posted

      Thank you Brenda for sharing with me. I appreciate it big time. This is all new to me. Unfortunately for me, laying flat is the only way for my heart rate to go back under 100 bpm. I am fresh out of a hip replacement and need to be exercising and cannot do as much as I want. I was born with pulmonary problems which have only worsened with age. I have only 30 % lung function left, but this has never scared me until now.

      💛 Dawn

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    • Posted

      DawnDedee,

      you are welcome! 

      I hope you can obtain a second opinion, just like you mentioned in your recent posting. Also, maybe you should seek out a good Cardiologist too, or someone that specializes in the pulmonary system (heart and lungs). 

      My husband had a hip replacement. It took him quite a while for his hip to go back to normal, but once it went back to normal, he absolutely loves having the replacement. But, I think easier exercises can help with hip replacement too. Maybe you could go to a indoor swimming pool and walk around inside it? My husband had serious rheumatoid arthritis and this was the only type of walking he could do..with the help of water bouncy. 

      Sorry that you have been scared lately with the lung function. I don't have much lung function either, and it use to scare me so much. I use to have problems with anxiety attacks, but that was mainly due to the heart + COPD. Now that the heart has healed more, the attacks have greatly lessened, since the breathing is more easier to cope with. I am wondering if your hip surgery could be having the same effect? Sorry, it so. 

      Take Care, and get well asap... 

      Brenda

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    • Posted

      Thank you for your comments. I am seeing my heart specialist in four weeks so will have a good talk to him about this.
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