Dad had a biopsy done on prostate

Posted , 11 users are following.

Hi. Guys I'm new to this my dad is 70 an went to get normal blood work done an his prostate level was a 10.8 an his prostate was enlarge.. we went to get a biopsy done today.. we are waiting on results what dose this mean has any body had the same.. it's been hard on me just waiting very concerned I just lost my mom a year ago an just took over for my mom.. on caring for my dad..

0 likes, 45 replies

Report / Delete

45 Replies

Next
  • Posted

    Nicki: I am sorry to hear of your loss, but at this stage you should not worry about your Dad's biopsy.  I am not a doctor, but having been down this road I recommend you wait for the biopsy results before assuming the worst.  An enlarged prostate is the norm for males his age. I will leave it at that until you advise further.

    I will also add that PSA is a very poor indicator. It gives false readings for and against prostate issues. The trend is important, but once again ... I suggest you wait.  

    Stewart

    Report / Delete Reply
    • Posted

      Thank you. Just been stressing this alot he all I have.. an I don't understand much of all this. Thank goodness he has a good doctor that keeps up with his yearly check ups
      Report / Delete Reply
  • Posted

    A fewr things that may crop up for your father.  After a biopsy of the prostate it is perfectly normal for there to be some blood passed in the urine for up to a week. It is of no concern. There can also be some difficuilty in passing urine for a few days (swelling of the prostate causing partial obstruction). This should normally pass fairly quickly if it happens at all.

    On the other hand, occasionally there can be an infection into the prostate or bladder. He would normally have been given a short course of anitbiotics to take after the biopsy, and it is uncommon to get such an infection. But if there is any suspicion that one might be developing, it is wise to get straight onto your GP for a course of antibiotics because prostate infections, if they occur, can be quite hard to shift.

    Report / Delete Reply
    • Posted

      Thank you. He was in alot of pain after the biopsy.. but seems fine today.. his Gp Is not helpful at all..when I ask what a biopsy for he said to (check for cancer) an said to go make appt..I'm glad I made this forum.
      Report / Delete Reply
  • Posted

    My PSA was 5.1 when first tested and two biopsies were clear. At that time my prostate was 35 grams. as it increased in size to 75 grams my PSA went up to 9.8.

    After GL PVP surgery to reduce my prostate it came down to 5.0 again.

    Over the years it went up to 7.9 as my prostate regrew to 135 grams leading this time to aThulium laser procedure. Now three years later my PSA is 0.74. Big prostate usually means high PSA. 

    Report / Delete Reply
    • Posted

      Thank you.. do this discussion has made me for so much better.. my dad's doctor who did the test is no help.. when I asked him what's a biopsy for.. (to check for cancer) that was it.. an told ur to make a appt for it..
      Report / Delete Reply
    • Posted

      The new GP I had at the time was on the ball. My first visit to him was for lower back pain. He said it might be caused by my prostate and did a DRE and told me it was enlarged and sent me to a urologist.

      It was not the cause of the back pain but I was impressed. With my first biopsy I had dark 'old' blood in my semen for over six weeks. After the second one I was about to leave the hospital when blood started to spurt out of my back passage and I was kept overnight. A doctor doing rounds during the night asked why I was there. Ah, PSA terrorism he said most biopsies are unnecessary and often inaccurate. I had not been given an antibiotic that time and developed an infection that took weeks to clear up. 

      Report / Delete Reply
    • Posted

      See my dad says he had no symptoms but then again he won't tell me he not confortible with it he was so use to my mom.. but now that u say back pain for a few months now he say his Lower back would hurt he thought he pulled a muscle. But I never question him cause he said it went away. It may be nothing I ask him if he pees ok he says yes.. but then again he not going to tell me.
      Report / Delete Reply
  • Posted

    The unknown is so difficult to hold - all very well for us to say don't worry, but it's true that worry doesn't help him or you. Waiting for resuts when you are anxious is hard, but it is for a finite time, and even if the worst result from the biopsy comes, there are positives in finding out early. I have cancer inthe Prostate and have been untreated by design, as the monitoring of PSA levels and further biopsies have told my urology team and me that it is a non-growing cancer. I have learend to live with the anxiety of waiting for results, mainly I suppose because they have not been distressing when they come. I wish the same for you and your Dad, your love will help him more than your worry!
    Report / Delete Reply
    • Posted

      Thank you I'm glad I did this discussion before this I was clueless an no one to ask or know of any one going threw this. . An my dad's doctor was of no help.. when he said he would have a biopsy done. I ask for what he said to check for cancer am for me to make a appt.. I did one of these forums with my mom who passes away from ALS. an was so helpful
      Report / Delete Reply
    • Posted

      Hi, Nicki, Alan here.

      I am not a doctor, and even if I were I'd not feel comfortable giving you advice. I do, however, have a background in mechanical engineering so hopefullyy I can think logically.

      What I suggest we do is that I am going to give you some tips and ideas which you can use to  help you navigate through the options that are open to you. And, of course, I wil be by your side to give you whatever support you require that is within my capablitiy. You can then use the material as you see fit.

      Your Dad seems to be strong-willed and at times you appear to have difficulty getting much needed information from him. How frustrating this must be for you, but do not despair!

      During our early upbringing we -- the family 0f human kind, that is -- we're all brought up to behave in a manner that was generally acceptable to our immediate family, and later to the community at large. Unfortunately this happened to us when we were still at a very young age and still unable to be very selective in what we actually accepted.

      I'm sure this happened to you as it did to me, and did to your Dad, and to the Doctror treating him. If the subject matter had anything to do with

      our more intimate selves, then secrecy was really applied, big time. and very private issues such as our sexuality and sexual  organs really became taboo.

      My guess is that your Dad is scared out of his wits by the very thought of discussing urination, bladder, male member, etc. and, quite beyond his control,  he just clams up. Try and be as gentle as you can with him!

      Ask yourself, Nicki, who can you confide in something very intimate, a close family member or a more distant person not directly related to the family?

      Winning your Dad''s trust, e.g. sharing something that only you two know anything about might, with a bit of luck, improve your communication.

      Could your Dad's doctor be in a similar situation, having to discuss intimate details with someone of the opposite gender? You? Ask him and see what his response is.

      Turning to our webs site, I note that some contributors tend to use acronyms extensively. Quite possibly they have gained the experience to do this, but how about you? I know from my own experience that this can slow down my rate of assimilation.

      The remedy: use the Internet itself to give you the correct interpretation of a term. As an example, type in 'TURP described', or similar and see what comes back. In short, create your own little dictionary.

      Changing the subject again, my understanding is that prostate cancer tends to advance quite slowly, hence the strategy of 'wait and see'. The advantage here is that you are probably not in any great rush, even if cancer were to be confirmed. Most contributors here seem to find the time to get second opinions, carry out background checks, and generally confirm the course of action they have chosen.

      Please note: in my view, the doctors and specialists can only "suggest" a course of action, but the ultimate decision "Go" or "No Go" should always rests with you.

      You have already shown that you understand this. You  must seek to make an informed decision; to make your deision as informed as ppossible, gather all the information you possibly can. weed out any data you have doubts about, examine your decision from different aspects, make final "polishing" changes, then go for it!

      I'll end here for now, but please keep in touch if you so wish. I do hope everything turns out well in the long run, and in your Dad's and your own favor!

      Warm regards,

      Alan.

      Report / Delete Reply

Join this discussion or start a new one?

New discussion Reply

Report or request deletion

Thanks for your help!

We want the forums to be a useful resource for our users but it is important to remember that the forums are not moderated or reviewed by doctors and so you should not rely on opinions or advice given by other users in respect of any healthcare matters. Always speak to your doctor before acting and in cases of emergency seek appropriate medical assistance immediately. Use of the forums is subject to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy and steps will be taken to remove posts identified as being in breach of those terms.

newnav-down newnav-up