Debilitating lower left abdominal pain when exercising.

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When I exercise, or sometimes even when I just walk around places, my lower left abdomen hurts. I can’t run anymore and haven’t been able to for a year. I don’t even get tired when I run, my side just hurts unbearably. I’ve been told all sorts of things, but I’d like to hear more opinions about it. I haven’t brought it up with my doctors recently because I’ve been ignored in the past and, to be frank, I haven’t been very active recently, so I haven’t felt much pain from it. 

The only reason I bring this up now is because I want I start exercising regularly again, but the pain is hindering that. Any idea what it is?

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  • Posted

    It could be a pulled muscle or strain. You need to point the doctor in the right direction by explaining precisely where and what you feel and when. Tell your doctor that you want to begin exercising again but you are unable to because of the sharp pain you feel.
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  • Posted

     please read up under:

    Exercise-related abdominal pain as a manifestation of the median arcuate ligament syndrome

     

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    • Posted

      The

      ncbi link

      is the one especially for you,

      "Exercise-related transient abdominal pain (ETAP)"

      It's typical for athletes with a 'stitch' or 'cramp' when exercising, so much, that they give up being active.

      It will never 'just heal'. It's an anatomical predisposition.

      The test to go is ultrasound of Coeliac Artery in supine, upright and after exercise in inspiration and expiration. Please find an imaging center, that has tested for it before.

      Some CTA MRA do not show it and HAVE to be done in expiration breath hold (again, not all imaging facilities know that)

      From there often that is enough, some have to do diagnostic coeliac nerve blocks or intravascular pressure measurements plus vasodilators to measure reaction and effect (the definite test for MALS), but sometimes the less invasive imaging (like ultrasound) plus symptoms are pretty clear cut.

      Also for exclusion.

      All the best!

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