Deletion of discussions

Posted , 4 users are following.

How do I contact a moderator about a discussion that was deleted.

I dont understand how the discussion violated your rules.

0 likes, 11 replies

Report / Delete

11 Replies

  • Posted

    Find the point where the Moderator deleted your post and you will find a reference there to the Moderator who was involved.

    Clicking on the name of the Moderator will take you through to a page where you can send an email through.

    You will then be able to ask your question.

    They do not have to give you an explanation, but if they do it is usually a good one.

    Report / Delete Reply
  • Posted

    I searched the site with the name of the bracelets stated and found that while Google itself shows hits on this site for them, using this site's search function does not. They must be seen as "quack" medicine here it seems to me.

    Strangely, forum posts on magnetic bracelets for osteoarthritis have been allowed to stand.

    What the deletion has also removed, however, is what I wrote relating to the role/importance of copper for the body to produce L-DOPA from tyrosine. I understand that to be well founded /biochemistry/medical science/ and I am not currently aware of any other discussion of it in these forums.

    Report / Delete Reply
    • Posted

      Dear RobertT

      Thanks for that information.  It makes me wonder what I eat that would normally give me copper?  I have no idea so I'll search fror it.  In the meantime I'll try the copper chelate and see if I can feel a difference.    Not very scientific but its hard to do a double blind test on yourself.

      I think a lesson here is that if you get a bit off topic you should put informative posts on  the best discussion thread and then put a pointer on the original discussion.   Or something like that but it all feels like its doubling the effort.

      Cheers Graham

      Report / Delete Reply
    • Posted

      Further Internet searches today show only a few sources saying copper is a cofactor in the tyrosine to L-DOPA conversion; most just say the cofactors are iron and oxygen (and BH4 which doesn't seem to contain copper). Most do say copper is a cofactor in the conversion of dopamine to noradrenalin.

      There is no shortage of seemingly reliable sources saying copper is important for iron transport.

      If tyrosine supplemantation does not work, and probably one has an adequate supply from protein in the diet anyway, and L-DOPA deos work, is it not reasonable to assume that its's the conversion of tyrosine to L-DOPA that's the problem? If the components necessary for it are present and/or available, what feedback or other factor within the nervous system or the body's biochemistry could affect this process?

      Report / Delete Reply
    • Posted

      Dear RobertT

      Sounds interesting but I am not knowledgable in this complex area.   The medical profession is obviously guessing when it comes to RLS so if you have an idea its worth offering to somone in the business.

      Are you involved in research into medical matters?   I have read that about 5 to 10% of the population have RLS.   Hence wouldnt you think that 5% of medical researchers would think it was worth a major effort?

      Look at the number of contributors to this forum.     Maybe we should all donate a euro, a dollar or a pound to some research establishment.

      In no time at all we would be paying for a huge beuracracy driving Beemers and holding conferences in the west indies or Singapore.

      Cheers

      Graham

      Report / Delete Reply
    • Posted

      Well, I did get a physics degree but I'm not really a chemist even if I did research on water partly funded by an international food company.

      I can scarcely think researchers haven't considered what I'm saying, except perhaps one should remember the film "Lorenzo's Oil" and think that the most unlikely thing about it was probably the volume of information a public library had on its shelves! I'm also rather aware that a number of quite large nuclear power stations were built before the corrosive action of such a mundane thing as carbon dioxide on mild steel (at higher temperatures) was discovered.

      Report / Delete Reply
    • Posted

      Dear RobertT

      Researchers sometimes miss things or can't find funding for their ideas.   In the case of a FODMAP diet its much more profitable for the Pharmaceutical companies to develop a drug than to find a diet that alleviates the symptoms.  Hence the need for Universities who need research projects for advanced students but have to pay for them out of their own meagre funds.   I read somewhere that a significant number of good ideas wither because the researcher can't find a couple of dozen volunteers for the human testing trials.   You need 10 or 12 in the test group and another 10 or 12 similar people in a control group.   You probably see advertisements in doctors waiting rooms and so on.   The problem is apparently that you only have a short time to find your volunteers before your funding lapses.   I'm in a test group at the moment for a treatment and if it works and is released I will let everfyone on this forum know.   I think I agreed not to tell details until its been accepted by the university.   Slightly off the topic but the Michael J Fox research group into Parkinsons are looking for human test subjects at times and they maintain a register of possible subjects.  They do cooperative work with researchers all over the world.     I expect there are others nearer you if you would like to contribute a few hours of spare time.    Of course in many cases you have to be unfortunate enough to have some condition so its a bit of an exclusive club that you are happy not to qualify for.    In my case I have a slight "condition" that might be a precursor to Parkinsons or it might not be.    They will know more after I successfully negotiate another 25 years or so.    Its really long term stuff and we might hope that others will have found a cure before the result of observing me matters.     Incidently I have been assured that RLS is not a precursor to Parkinsons even though it is thought  they have some things in common.

      Ill still try the copper and see if I can see a difference.   The iron definately helped me for a period of a month or so and now I can't be sure but I continue to take it just in case.     If I reach zero RLS I can afford to start dropping some things off to see if I still need them.

      Report / Delete Reply
    • Posted

      Yes, at on time it was thought that maybe RLS was stage 0 Parkinson's. This paper comparing the two conditions is almost readable:

      http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3514082/

      Regarding the issue of the main or most common problem thought to be causing RLS, getting iron in the right form into cell fluid so it can work with tyrosine hydroxylase, this PowerPoint presentation by Penn State's Milton Hershey Medical Center is quite good:

      www.rls.org/Document.Doc?id=1674

      The Milton Hershey Medical Center seems to be doing quite a bit of research of interest to us, including that needing volunteers.

      Report / Delete Reply

Join this discussion or start a new one?

New discussion Reply

Report or request deletion

Thanks for your help!

We want the forums to be a useful resource for our users but it is important to remember that the forums are not moderated or reviewed by doctors and so you should not rely on opinions or advice given by other users in respect of any healthcare matters. Always speak to your doctor before acting and in cases of emergency seek appropriate medical assistance immediately. Use of the forums is subject to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy and steps will be taken to remove posts identified as being in breach of those terms.

newnav-down newnav-up