Difference Hyperthyroidism & Grave's Disease

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Difference Hyperthyroidism & Grave's Disease

I have overactive thyroid thats the only thing my doctor said and just recently I read about Grave's disease thus this mean i might as well have grave disease?.

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  • Posted

    That is where hyperthyroidism leads you. I know, as I have Graves disease. There is treatment for Graves, but it is miserable going through it. it is more miserable than hyperthyroidism.

    I am treated with Methmazole , and I am still going through the effects, but not as bad as it was. Hopefully your Endocrinologist is giving you some medication.

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  • Posted

    That is where hyperthyroidism leads you. I know, as I have Graves disease. There is treatment for Graves, but it is miserable going through it. it is more miserable than hyperthyroidism.

    I am treated with Methmazole , and I am still going through the effects, but not as bad as it was. Hopefully your Endocrinologist is giving you some medication.

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    • Posted

      Are you also experiencing hair loss? if yes can you give some advice on how to prevent or at least reduced it.

      Thanks,

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    • Posted

      i have no hair loss due to the medication i am taking. Graves disease, i believe can be put in remission. i know of many who never fell into again,

      yet there are others who have been in remission for as long as three years, and it reared it's ugly head again. However, as i have stated previously, it can be controlled again. I do believe there are many who never have a problem with it.

      Don't worry. A good Endocrinologist will help you greatly.

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    • Posted

      Thanks Arlea for the information you share. Hope mine would not move to Grave's.

      And praying for our wellness.

      Thanks & Best Regards,

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    • Posted

      i probably didn't really tell you the difference Hyperthyroidism is you thyroid dumping far too much iodine in your system, and Graves disease is where you have no more iodine, and that's where a supplement comes in .

      Hope this helps

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  • Posted

    I'm on carbimazole 5mg and propranolol 10mg are Graves a life time disease?

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  • Posted

    Hyperthyroidism can have many causes. Sometimes it is caused by cysts or nodules on your thyroid gland or it can be caused by autoimmune diseases like Graves or Hashimoto's thyroiditis where your immune system puts out antibodies that attack the thyroid gland itself or the pituitary gland receptors that control how much thyroid hormone is produced. In Graves, it is attacking the TSH receptors in the pituitary gland and in Hashimoto's it is attacking the thyroid gland itself causing it to produce too much thyroid hormone. So while the most important thing is to block the excessive thyroid hormone that is being produced, most Endocrinologists will try to determine the cause. They will do blood tests to measure the antibodies to determine the cause of the hyperthyroidism. I was diagnosed with Graves as the cause of my hyperthyroidism and was put on 10 mg of Methimazole to lower my thyroid hormone values and 10 mg of Propranolol to normalize my heart rate. While this controlled most of my symptoms, I didn't really go into remission (that is in addition to having normal thyroid blood tests also having non-detectable antibodies) until I added supplements to my treatment regimen to replace the vitamins, minerals and amino acids that were lost from my body when my thyroid was overactive.

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    • Posted

      The Graves autoantibody, TSI, attack (bind to) TSH receptor on the surface of THYROID (not pituitary gland), thus cause (stimulating) thyroid gland to produce more and more thyroid hormone (T4) and in turn cause pituitary gland to reduce TSH to low level. So pituitary gland is NOT attacked by Graves antibody TSI. Is taking Methimazole alone for long time (2 years) and failing in lifting TSH a common case? Does taking ATM alone have no/little effect on lifting, improving TSH? What are all other GD patients' experience? Please share, thanks.

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    • Posted

      Here's what I found out about it. The hypothalamus secretes the thyroid releasing hormone (TRH), which stimulates thyrotrophs in the anterior pituitary to secrete TSH. ... TSH binds and activates the TSH receptor (TSHR), which is a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) on the basolateral surface of thyroid follicle cells.

      I have seen a difference in responses between Graves and Hashimoto's patients. Many patients with Graves like myself who are on a dose of Methimazole that normalizes their Free T3 and T4 will not normalize their TSH result unless they take further action and take supplements which I did. My TSH was 0 for two years, then I added supplements and it finally started to rise. With Hashimoto patients, I have seen their TSH rise when they are given Methimazole but they also have difficulty keeping their thyroid test levels normal on Methimazole and bounce from high to low and back again. I have also seen Hashimoto patients control their disease and normalize and keep all their thyroid tests normal by taking only Regular L-Carnitine. In my case, I took Regular L-Carnitine alone with meds and it only raised my TSH to 0.12. Then I added Acetyl-L-Carnitine to the Regular L-Carnitine abd neds and it raised my TSH to 0.70 within the normal range and fell again when I could not get the Acetyl for a good year. Acetyl-L-Carnitine has a lot of Acetyl and a little bit of carnitine in it and Regular L-Carnitine has a lot of carnitine and a little bit of Acetyl in it. The Acetyl crosses the blood-brain barrier which is why I believe Graves patients do well on it with correcting their TSH because it carries the carnitine and any other meds you are taking across the blood brain barrier and affecting the pituitary,

      Your pituitary gland is about the size of a pea and is situated in a bony hollow, just behind the bridge of your nose. It is attached to the base of your brain by a thin stalk. The hypothalamus, which controls the pituitary by sending messages, is situated immediately above the pituitary gland.

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