Do I go ahead and have my other eye done?

Posted , 3 users are following.

This discussion has been locked due to a period of inactivity. Start a new discussion

As I posted in another thread, after my left eye was done, I started seeing two lines radiating out from any highlights. They were very long and noticeable but as others posted after a while they seemed to disappear.  However, I notice that they are still there although to a lesser extent.  I had my post-op meeting with the consultant (it's now four weeks since the op) and asked him. He told me that it might be due to residual astigamtism and I am annoyed with myself for not asking him to explain because all my research into astigmatism talks about blurred vision.

This is most definitely not the case with me as my vision in the left eye is pin sharp (I had a corrective lens inserted). So I think I am starting to lose faith in the consultant and am apprehensive about having the second eye done by him. I don't need it being done yet BUT and this is a huge BUT being in the UK and our NHS strapped for cash, by the time the NHS will agree to have the op done, I will really be struggling with my sight in that eye.  I currently have private healt cover and they are willing to pay to have it done. 

Now factor in the letter I received this morning from Nuffield stating that their default position is for patients to share a room with up to three other same-sex people. As I type this I am starting to get stressed out again. Nuffield do say that one can request a single-room and indeed this is what I had last time and was perfectly happy in my own space, zoning out in my head and meditating and generally calming myself.  I know I won't be able to do that if I am in a room with others wanting to make small talk. 

And what about all the pre-prep stuff...taking blood pressure and putting in the drops?  Not very private.

Also I have OCD with regard to bacteria and disease and last time showered in my room, got rid of my bacteria-laden street clothes and put on a gown. At that point I was happy in that I had done all that I could to minimise infection.

I really am a very unhappy bunny at this point in time.  I think on Monday I need to text the consultant and ask him to call me when he gets a moment and ask him to explain how/why he thinks it is astigmatism.  Maybe I am wrong...I am open to input from you guys.  I will also ring Nuffield up as the appointment is scheduled for a couple of weeks time to request a single-room. 

0 likes, 14 replies

Report

14 Replies

  • Posted

    You likely have a fold at the back of the eye. I have same thing. 2 lines streaking accross from any light source. Headlights are worst. It can be removed with a simple yag laser procedure. I have cme so need to get that cleared first but what you describe should be easy to deal with.
    Report
    • Posted

      Thanks for that. I found reference to that as well..a posterior capsule wrinkle.  I will go and see my optometrist and ask him to look into my eyes and tell me if I have  wrinkle or not. He will be able to see it if it is there.  And if it is there then my consultant will become an ex-consultant.
      Report
  • Posted

    Why do you need a room? Do they keep you in the hospital post-op? Here in the States catract surgery is done as an out-patient basis, the whole thing takes about an hour.

    Know your stressed out and not trying to minimize that, but I wish I only had "two streaks".  I have several different visual abberations, after routine cataract surgery a year and a half ago and after 2 following operations, most of my symptoms are worse than ever and 2 different docs say thye really don't know what's causing my problems and there's nothing more they can do. I also have the 2nd eye that should be done but I've been holding off due what happened with the first.

    Good luck.

     

    Report
    • Posted

      Why do I need a room?  Most reasons are in the OP.  Also I'm a high-functioning sociopath and borderline OCD with regard to minimising possible routes to infection.

      Nikki.... I would rather die than sit in a room full of people wittering on about the EU.

      Report
  • Posted

    Yes, I have had my left eye done and notice "edge glare" (google this) when coming from dark into light and then when there are glaring lights 45 degrees to my right. This probably won't go away, I also have some floaters - but like you the vision is fanatastic - better than 20:20 at my follow-up - I am ecstatic! Just anazing - the last time I could see like this was when I was 9 years old - not much short of 50 years ago!!! So I'll put up with the edge glare - the follow-up - I did mention the floaters, she intomated that it ws only temporary - not sure if it is, but I'll live with it. My right eye op is on Monday and I can"t wait

    My advice is to have your second eye done with the NHS, - yes, you will be eith other people after the op but youcan zone out as well, should be no problem there. We had a lively duscussiom on why it was best to stay in Europe - no small talk there!

    Obviously make your consultant or the clinical eye staff aware of your problem, goes without saying, and be forceful, if you don't understand, ask them to explain ...

    Report
    • Posted

      Sorry Nikki....replied to the wrong post.  There is not a snowball's chance in Hell that I will wait to have it done on the NHS. I will have years and years of gradually deteriorating eyesight (currently there is only the slightest amount of yellowing in my right eye and visio (with contact lens) is fine.  It is going to get harder and harder to get this done. The bar will be raised higher and higher.  Even now NHS Gloucestershire have burnt their fingers by delaying cataract surgery for too long.  Many patients find that their lens have hardened to the extent that what would have been a short operation is now a much longer operation and a much larger slit in the cornea because the surgeon has to go in with a scalpel and gradually slice bits off the now hardened lens.  The NHS is great for emergencies and real accidents....
      Report
    • Posted

      It was private medecine that failed to spot my advanced cataracts. Once I managed to get an appt.with th NHS the consultant spotted the advance state of my cataracts, hence they opetated in the shortest possible time to avoid invasive surgery. I am not impressed with private medecine.

      If your sight is OK with contact lens, then don't bother, but have jt reviewed yearly by an opthalmic surgeon, not an optemetrist or a Boots VisionExpress etc. assistant, you will have to pay a bit more, (yes, it's private too), but you will get far better treatment.

      Report
  • Posted

    So. I saw an ophthalmologist.

    No posterior capsule wrinkle.  

    Minimal (ie at the limit of measurement) astigmatism.

    There are ridges in IOL with a slightly pronounced one along the same axis as my radial lines. She says that these ridges are not uncommon, that other patients who have had the surgery might have the same issue but that it didn't really bother them. Certainly I'm not going down the route of getting the lens replaced. 

    She also said that my consultant was correct in saying that it might have been caused by astigmatism...just not in my case.  Am a bit disappointed that he didn't bother to check for astigmatism when I was there but equally I should have pushed for him to do it.

    So do I go ahead?  The answer has to be 'Yes'.  The risk will always be there. I will need the right eye done at some time in the future.  The current status of the NHS is not sustainable in the future.  The demographics of a growing and ageing population and rates of migration will see to that.  I predict that cataract surgery will be rationed.

    Report
    • Posted

      Really sorry to hear your problens - that's a very shoddy treatment you have received and if it were me, I would pursue to the end. Checking for astigmatism is part of the phacoemulsification procedure, for God's sake. I would be very angry and demand my right to have a second opinion - on the NHS ( the majority of private surgeons work in the NHS and vice-versa) I just wouldn't let this matter rest. There are excellent NHS ophthalmic surgeons out there, they can see very clearly and quickly what the matter. An opthalmoligist is not enough. It MUST be a consultant (surgeon) - you have a right to this. Do this before thinking about your other eye. Don't be fobbed off by assistants that say"Well it could be this, It could be that" - they have apparatus that can see exactly what's wrong, the consultants at least. Don't give up - you pay into the NHS every working hour of your life, they have a duty to see to you. My op.went very well Monday, yes, there has been rationing in this area for years now for the teasons you suggest, but you, Mike, don't let thay worry you - for goodness sake don't be fobbed off 😠
      Report
  • Posted

    Hey ho...so I had the second eye done and guess what.

    Two bloody radial lines ---this time along the 9'oclock/3 o'clock axis...I think it must be those crappy lenses from Alcon.

    Report
    • Posted

      Either that or my consultant has got an injector/whatever that scores the lens.
      Report
    • Posted

      What the heck??? ! What action did they take on your first eye? I will ask at my follow-up a) what lenses were used on my eye and b)what Alcon lenses are like. I have it Monday week. Although I have edge glare going from dark to light ( because the artificial lense is smaller than my previous, natural lens, when the pupil is wide open in dark conditions, the light shines on the edge of the lens), otherwise they are netter than perfect. I had floaters in the first eye which have fisappeared after 7 weeks.
      Report
    • Posted

      which disappeared after 7 weeks. They have given you an emergency number for the weekend, so contact them NOW and go BALLISTIC if they don't agree to see you tomorrow, this not hood news
      Report

Join this discussion or start a new one?

New discussion

Report as inappropriate

Thanks for your help!

We want the forums to be a useful resource for our users but it is important to remember that the forums are not moderated or reviewed by doctors and so you should not rely on opinions or advice given by other users in respect of any healthcare matters. Always speak to your doctor before acting and in cases of emergency seek appropriate medical assistance immediately. Use of the forums is subject to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy and steps will be taken to remove posts identified as being in breach of those terms.

newnav-down newnav-up