Does anyone have symptoms of menopause who are long past having periods?

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I am suffering lots of symptoms folk describe as menopause but I am long past having periods (the only plus of menopause!).

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  • Posted

    hi anne... oh please dont say this continues after menopause 😏 was hoping it got better after being in my almost 9th year of peri ... I dont take HRT just naturl remedies... hope things improve for you soon ... Jay xx
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    • Posted

      Hi Jayneejay,

      I read somewhere that you can have shortage of oestrogen (hope spelt that right) after menopause and that it can cause symptoms., I was looking for someone to confirm that they have experienced it.  Perhpas its not so, but it seems like it may be. I'm coming back as a man next time.  Will keep you posted. [wink] ​

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    • Posted

      Hi Anne

      hahahahaha yes me too. they have it a lot easier... 

      be nice if some ladies talked about it so you know and i know what next.. 😩

      sounds very possible what you say... take care .. Jay x

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    • Posted

      Hi Jaynee, what herbal remedies do you find helpful. I am using Kalms and herbal teas to help the stress that its causing me, and they are helping, more than I expected actually. What do you find helpful? X
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    • Posted

      Hi Anne

      I take it all 😃 I have had 9 years of trying everything, last period was Aug 13  so still not out the woods yet..

      I take Estroven Maximum, Maca, iron, Vit B 12, Vit B 6, Natecal D ( Vit D & Calcium Mix ) for our bones..  Vit B1 as not only is that good, but as I live in Southern Spain it keeps mozzys off you too... 

      jay x

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    • Posted

      Anne

      this may interest you.. useful snippet ... 

      Everyone needs B-vitamins for good health. Without them we can suffer from a variety of serious ailments. For a woman going through perimenopause, B-vitamins can be essential for effectively managing symptoms.   

      Adrenal fatigue, for example, is a common secondary condition for many women going through perimenopause. B-vitamins support healthy adrenal function, along with calming and maintaining a healthy nervous system. Many women also suffer with mood swings during perimenopause. Both B12 and B6 vitamins aid in the production of neurotransmitters such as serotonin, a key brain chemical needed to stabilize moods and promote feelings of wellness and contentment.

      For women who suffer with brain fog, and memory issues in perimenopause, low levels of B6 could be part of the problem. Depression, confusion, and an inability to concentrate are all associated with B6 deficiency. Vertigo, dizziness, and heart palpitations are also common complaints from women going through perimenopause. All of these symptoms have been associated with (among other things) a B12 deficiency. Vitamin B6 can also help with stubborn weight gain in perimenopause. It is key in the breakdown and utilization of carbohydrates, fats, and proteins in our diet, and is necessary for a healthy metabolism - both which can help manage weight.

      Jay 

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    • Posted

      Anne

      reading this may be adding Vit E to my vast collection 😉

      Sail Through Menopause With a Little B and E

      by Merri Lu Park

      It's not surprising that as a woman's body changes, her dietary needs change, also. Unfortunately, that isn't the focus of mainstream medicine.

      The National Institute on Aging includes menopause along with senile dementia and cerebrovascular diseases on its list of "diseases associated with aging." These attitudes are wrong!

      The discovery of estrogen and progesterone as the hormones produced by the ovaries came in 1923 and by the early 1930s synthetic estrogen was being produced. That was the beginning of estrogen "replacement" as a possibility for postmenopausal women who could now be treated for something they had "lost."

      Since the 1960s the medical term "estrogen deficiency" has been routinely used by physicians, drug companies and in the media, linking menopause in many people's minds with true deficiency diseases, such as diabetes, in which people are dependent on daily medication for the rest of their lives. This is a case of a product in search of a market. It is also a case of repeatedly connecting the idea of deficiency with menopausal women, creating a picture of them as inadequate, incomplete, lacking and defective. This makes no sense in the face of evidence that attention to nutrition can make the biggest difference in a woman's transition.

      Break the Menopause Myth

      The vitamins that make up the B complex play a key role in maintaining health during the menopausal years. They are necessary for strong adrenal glands, a healthy nervous system and the conversion of carbohydrates into the glucose we need for energy.

      Vitamin B, keeps the mucous membranes healthy, including those of the vagina. It is also an antioxidant, especially in collaboration with vitamin C. It helps alleviate memory loss, decreases sensitivity to noise, improves concentration, relieves depression and corrects loss of appetite. Good sources of Bx are whole cereals, beans, potatoes and nuts.

      B2 is responsible for the release and activity of a variety of hormones, including estrogen. It also helps keep skin, nails and hair healthy. Good sources of B2 are milk and eggs.

      B12 lifts depression, reduces anxiety, helps decrease mood swings and eliminates fatigue. Vegetarian sources containing significant amounts of B12 include several seaweeds such as arame, wakame and nori, as well as pickles, sauerkraut, tempeh, tamari, miso and B12-enriched soy products. Animal-derived sources include eggs, milk and fish. Food supplements rich in B12 are blue green algae, chlorella, barley green and spirulina.

      B6 (pyridoxine) is a natural diuretic which is effective in reducing water retention. It is useful to reduce bloating that can appear before your period. It helps prevent depression and promotes calm moods and restful sleep. It also interacts with estrogen in the body. This vitamin is found in most foods and a deficiency is fairly rare, however hormone therapy can deplete the body's levels of B6 and decreased levels can lead to depression.

      Niacin (vitamin B3) helps with the body's production of estrogen and other sex hormones. It reduces blood cholesterol, dilates blood vessels and is sometimes prescribed to prevent premenstrual headaches. It may improve insomnia, nervousness, confusion, anxiety, memory loss, irritability, apathy and depression.

      If you're using B vitamins to help prevent hot flashes, be sure to use the form of niacin called niacinamide. Other forms of niacin dilate the blood vessels, which can cause flushing and worsen hot flashes, rather than relieve them.

      Folic acid helps the body manufacture and use estrogen. It helps reduce forgetfulness, soothe irritability, correct insomnia and promotes the formation of healthy red blood cells, which is why a deficiency of this vitamin can lead to anemia. It may help prevent precancerous changes in the cervix. A deficiency of folic acid has been associated with depression. Sources of folic acid include green leafy vegetables, nuts, beans and peas.

      Enter a New Age With Ease

      One of the most important factors to consider is vitamin E. Research has shown that for 50 to 75 percent of women, vitamin E is the most practical and effective treatment for uncomfortable signs of menopause, especially hot flashes, but including nervousness, heart palpitations, shortness of breath, fatigue, dizziness and insomnia. Vitamin E contains small amounts of estrogen and is essential for the proper functioning of the blood and for the production of estrogen, which may explain why it helps decrease or eliminate hot flashes.

      Vitamin E has the ability to relieve vaginal dryness and painful intercourse. It also enhances oxygen utilization in the body and stimulates immunity against cancer of the cervix, breasts, lungs, skin, digestive tract and rectum, which alone are sufficient reasons to use it.

      The preferable formulation is the natural form of vitamin E, the d'alpha-tocopherol type, as this is at least 36 per cent more biologically potent than synthetic E (called dl-alpha). Dr Leslie Packer, a professor of molecular biology at the University of California, states that synthetic E contains only one-eighth the amount of alpha-toco-pherol as natural vitamin E.

      When taking vitamin E, start with 200 to 400 IU daily and then gradually increase the dosage to 800 IU; 1,200 IU or 1,600 IU daily. It may take two to six weeks before you notice a difference, so give it time to work.

      Many doctors now recommend eliminating caffeine from your diet and taking 800 IU of vitamin E daily to reduce the condition known as fibrocystic breasts. Taking selenium, 200 meg daily, along with the vitamin E may enhance its effect on decreasing breast lumpiness. Another study stated that vitamin E, taken in doses of 100 IU or more a day, reduced heart disease by up to 66 percent.

      Vitamin E is found most abundantly in unprocessed vegetable oils, including sunflower, safflower, soybean and corn oil, nuts and seeds, leafy green vegetables, dried beans, whole grain cereals and breads and toasted wheat germ as well as in some fruits.

      Jay 

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    • Posted

      Jaynee, thanks for all this very useful information. I shall try to make a list of what I think would be a manageable assortment of helpful supplents!   I feel hopeful and positive. I shall let you know in a few months how I am. Thank you, best wishes, Anne smile
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  • Posted

    Hi anne,  Unfortunately I have menopause symptons still 8 years after a total hysterectomy.  I questioned this with my GP who said, "Oh this can go on into your 70's".  So it seems that no it doesn't stop at the menopause.  I have also spoken to many elderly women I work with who also say the same thing.
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  • Posted

    Yes I have not had a cycle in 2yrs or more. Hopefully you'll feel better then I do sad
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