Eczema problem!

Posted , 5 users are following.

Hello, I've been suffering from this skin infection for the past year. I have eczema on my wrists, hands, and under my armpits.

It started off on just my right arm. Subsequently, after a few months I had it on my left arm. I've been using CeraVe cream, fucidin cream, clotrimaderm (anti-fungal creams), plus UriSec, and Eucerin (moisturizer creams). As well, I shower every night with a scentless wash soap (Dove scentless body wash).

I also have an infection on the back of my hands in a circular area. Plus, over the last month or so, I've contracted this eczema on both of my armpits. I'm not too sure why or how it got there. The eczema itches a lot. I scratch it fairly frequently to relieve this itch.

I tried using jock itch spray, but that works somewhat. It stings when I spray it onto the eczema. It doesn't work entirely well.

What other treatments are there to help cure this eczema on my skin?

Please see the photos for a better understanding of what I have...

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7 Replies

  • Posted

    There are a group of preservatives ending in zolinone, for example one added to a lot of toiletries like shampoo, hand wash, moisturizer, sun creams and also fabric softeners, cleaning products, paint and wallpaper paste is called methylisothiazolinone that about 10% of the population are allergic to. They can have skin reactions and/or breathing reactions to these chemicals. Look in the ingredients of your shampoo, hand wash, hand cream, shower gel, fabric softener, washing detergent, washing up liquid, etc and anything that ends in zolinone try to avoid it.

    I would recommend dermol 500 lotion to wash with rather than soap.

    When you get really itchy skin if you can try and put an ice pack on rather than scratching, I know it isn't always possible but when you can it is so much better for you.

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    • Posted

      I have never heard of this preservative before, and I'm not sure if I'm actually allergic to it. But I will definitely keep this in mind!

      Thanks for the ice pack tip. I will see if that helps relieve the itching.

      Also, I've never used Dermol 500 Lotion before. I will try to get a bottle of it and try it out and see if it works.

      Thanks!

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  • Posted

    It's probably worth a visit to your doctor. There's an allergy test known as a patch test that can be done. basically, they tape a piece of paper to your back that has small concentrated versions of the 20 most common allergens and wait a couple of weeks to see if your skin reacts. If you get a positive result on this test, you'll then know which chemicals/preservatives to avoid.

    I agree that soap is not something you want to use on skin with eczema. However, because the skin is broken, it is more likely to get infected. I use a really gentle body wash (QV brand is good if you're in Australia, or something like Aveeno or cetaphil in other countries) most of the time, and an antibacterial wash 3 times a week to reduce the likelihood of infection. And frequent moisturiser, especially after showering.

    The most important advice I can give is to see a doctor. I put it off with my eczema, which eventually got to a terrible state, and I was under the care of a dermatologist for a couple of years. The good news is that through prescription medication and ointments I was able to get it under control. I now only need the prescription steroid cream occasionally when small patches start to flare up. I know how frustrating and life-changing it can be when eczema gets in the way of your sleep and daily activities, but hang in there. Effective management is achievable in consultation with your doctor.

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  • Posted

    Consider trying a St. John's Wort cream on your lesions. Some clinical trials have demonstrated success... you can type up "St. John's Wort Eczema clinical trials" in your search engine to read all about it. It's a plant-based product so you obviously won't need a prescription.

    I have personally cured myself completely from eczema over 5 years ago, but by taking SJW pills internally instead of applying a cream. There are possible interactions if you take the pills along with other medication, so you should read about those first, if you elect to try this method.

    All the best,

    Greg.

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    • Posted

      Interesting. I have heard of this product before. I think I will stop by my local health food store and have a look first.

      I believe there is the cream form and the pill form too. I'll need to research about these two.

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  • Posted

    Indeed! The cream is on the slightly expensive side and is mostly offered to treat various skin disorders. The pills, on the other hand, are quite cheap and are mostly offered to treat insomnia, anxiety and mild depression; they did work extremely well for my eczema however. I have also told other eczema patients about my success story and some (but not all) have confirmed comparable results.

    Enjoy reading about this wonderful plant first!

    Greg.

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