entrenching hypothyroidism?

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I was recently diagnosed, through two blood tests as having an under-active thyroid. I had none of the usual symptoms, but I was prescribed Levothyroxine 50 micrograms and told to take it for the rest of life. I guess in all likelihood the dosage will need to be increased in the future, depending on blood test results.

But I have a question. Perhaps the under-active thyroid is only a temporary imbalance – a response to some environmental or psychological factor.. And what if those factors change or end after a while? In the absence of medication I can imagine that the thyroid swings back into normal operation.

But as I AM taking medication, the thyroid hormone levels in my body are normal, are they not? So the brain does not know there is a problem. So it does not act (assuming this is possible) to adjust hormone production in the thyroid gland. So the gland stays in under-production. It has no chance of functioning normally again. And the condition becomes entrenched

The same sort of argument is applied to the wearing of glasses. The refractive error produced by the eye may be a temporary imbalance, as a result of stress, environmental factors, etc. If the glasses are prescribed, the eyes are in focus with those glasses even though they are producing a refractive error. And so the brain is fooled, it says to itself ''Everything is perfect, no need to adjust the eyes''. And so the refractive error becomes fixed, established.

I would welcome people's comments on this perspective.

Clive

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  • Posted

    The only way to find out is to come off the levothyroxine and have another blood test, as I think the only way we could do that is to decrease  the dose gradually under doctors advice. Like you I was told I have to take it for the rest of my life,the blood test prove if the level of thyroxine is working one way or the other. It is an interesting argument. Has anyone ever come off them with doctors consent as the  function has returned to normal levels ?
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    • Posted

      Thanks for the response, Doreen.

      Can you say why it is necessary to decrease the dose gradually, rather than suddenly discontinue?

      Seems to me the blood test only tells what the level of thyroid hormone in the blood is. It does not distinguish if that level is a result of the medication, or stems from the activity of the thyroid gland. Am I mistaken?

      That is a very interesting question that you ask, if the thyroid function has ever retutned to health naturally.  Let us see what replies come, if any. But how could one find out, without discontinuing the medication?

      Clive 

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    • Posted

      As with all drugs, the body becomes dependent on them and rightly so ones own defences become inactive as the drugs do the work. I think doctors are too quick at putting people on thyroxine after only one blood test, I think they should be taken one month apart to double check the thyroids activity. In my case the dose was increased from 50 to 100mcgs within two months after blood tests.I am led to understand that it is quite dangerous to just come off them as the thyroid levels would drop like a clanger and may result in heart failure or seizure  or similar, I may be wrong on that point and maybe others on the site will let us know about that.Of course you would never know your levels without a blood test so all rather difficult for one to find out without a test being done whilst on the drug and one taken a couple of weeks after coming of the drug. I wonder if anyone has done that? Dee
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    • Posted

      Yes, the body becomes dependent on the drug, that is one way of putting my point.

      In actual fact I stopped taking the levothyroxine 3 day ago, after taking 11 daily doses. I have not noticed any ill effects, although as I said I was not experiencing any of the usual stated symptoms of hypothyroidism before I started to take the medication.

       

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    • Posted

      You have probably done it just in time before your body gets used to the drug taking over. It will be interesting to see what your next blood test reveals and I hope it is back to a normal level. I am very interested to know as perhaps I will come off the damn things myself.
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    • Posted

      I will keep you informed then. No one else on the forum seems to have any experience or knowledge in this area. I have just put my questions to a doctor acquaintance.
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    • Posted

      i came across this on the web:

      ''But before initiating treatment, your doctor should repeat the T.S.H. test a couple of months later to verify your low thyroid hormone levels, because abnormal readings sometimes resolve on their own.''

      My doctor did not give me this two months grace.

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    • Posted

      Nor did mine? seems   they are too keen to get you on levo? like statins perhaps.What a carry on,it appears we have to be our own doctor these days, when do you go for your next blood test? that will be the proof you need. How many blood tests have you had? I have had three since xmas, the second one my thyroid levels were still too low that is why she upped it to 100mcg, then I had another test recently and now my readings are within the" proper guidelines" All I can say is I do feel a little more energetic and alert but not like my old self and I am hoping things will get better over time. I have just lost my father and my husband has kidney failure which was only diagnosed last summer so things have been difficult and now I am sorting wedding arrangements out for my son who is getting married on the 26/7/14 with only 3 months notice and his wife to be is Japanese and they live in London and are getting married in the north east, so you can imagine how it is for me.
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    • Posted

      I can see that there are many factors in your life that could increase your level of stress. This is exactly the sort of thing, in my opinion, that can temporarily disrupt the systems of the body. Exactly which ones probably depends on the individual. But often we get over stress, or the causes dissipate, and the body can then recover. Unless, perhaps it has by that time been permanently damaged by medication.

      I had two blood tests, only about a week apart. I think the doctor suggested another in about 6 months, which, from what I read, is not soon enough.

      Yes, I am certainly not willing to blindly hand myself over to the tender mercies of the medical profession, especially knowing just how much influence the profit-making drug companies have on it.

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    • Posted

      I have been underactive for several years after Radio iodine treatment for over active thyroid. From what i have learned, not taking your thyroxine for 3 days will make no difference to your thyroid function atall, This is because it takes approx six week to make a difference to your body and blood results when there is a dosage change. 
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    • Posted

      I would dcinitely ask the GP what symptoms he is supposed to be treating. Some people are Hypo and don't know it... unlike me😞

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  • Posted

    I got a reply from my doctor acquaintance (retired) but he does not answer my question at all (The one I put to the forum initially). He just gives the standard medical line:

    Thank you for your confidence on my experience of medical problems. Unfortunately, you didn't tell me the results of the tests, but of course I trust on the conclusion of your doctor. This kind of thyreoid malfunction is quite common and in  far most cases permanent with a tendency of mild and slow progression. The usual ultimate dosage of thyroxin is about 100 micrograms taken once daily. The adequate dosage can be easily tested by a blood test yearly or every two years. The medication has no disadvantages, and it totally compensates the missing hormone production of your own thyreoid gland. This hypothyreosis is one of the most easily treated endocrine dysfunctions, and adequate medication will give permanent good health to your soul and body!

    I hope that you have advantage of my reflections.

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  • Posted

    Yes I agree I have had great levels of stress, one on top of the other.I am hoping that in time I will feel much better. It is suprising just how many people have thyroid deficiency, especially in family goups. I wonder if it is hereditary.Does anyone else in your family have it? my sister and neice are also on levothyroxine. Dee
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